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The Food Celebrity Paradox

Sep 8, 2011

by Danielle Tsi

Etsy.com handmade and vintage goods

We don’t have a TV at our house. It’s a strange circumstance, considering the amount of television programs I watched growing up. However, thanks to the wonders of broadband Internet, today our television habits are “on-demand,” when we want it. We have a soft spot for travel documentaries, especially when combined with food, as the Travel Channel does with Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations. A globe-trotting foodie cowboy and talented writer, Bourdain hogs the headlines every now and then — not for his latest gourmet adventures in some far-flung location, but for piping up, usually critically, about another food celebrity. His latest faux pas, according to The New York Times, was to label Paula Deen as a “menace” to America by virtue of her deep-fried, calorific-laden food universe. Perhaps because of his global palate and escargot-laden resume, it’s easy to label Bourdain as a food snob, as Deen did, triggering another war of opinions about America’s food habits.

The American food celebrity is a relatively young phenomenon, its rise largely attributable to the explosion of cable entertainment in homes across the country. Browse the Food Network or the Cooking Channel’s schedule and you’d find an array of programs as diverse in personality and interest as their audiences. In the fresh-faced, easy cooking entourage, Rachael Ray and Giada de Laurentis bring fragrant herbs home, while Sandra Lee, the queen of “semi-homemade,” offers canned shortcuts. Butted up against the gastrologically geeky Alton Brown is greasy-diner guru, Guy Fieri, while Jamie Oliver takes on not just your family’s meal, but an entire nation’s.

The Food Junk; Danielle Tsi

TV dinner or dinner on TV?

Despite the immense popularity of foodie entertainment, the interest in cooking seems to fizzle out somewhere between the television set and the kitchen stove. According to a recent Harris Poll, only three out of ten Americans profess a love for cooking, and just two out of five prepare home-cooked meals five or more times a week. It would seem that, for most Americans, twenty-first century cooking has evolved into a spectator sport, far from its humble beginnings as an educational tool on public television in the ‘60s.

To capitalize on America’s penchant for food-related entertainment, perhaps an opportunity for real change would have to come in the form of a food personality that represents what America genuinely aspires to: good, tasty food that’s not too expensive and easy to prepare, in a way that doesn’t destroy our health and the environment. In my mind, this celebrity would be a Super-Nanny-meets-Alice-Waters figure who helps working parents overcome the challenges of implementing a nutritious diet for their families. From loss of employment to picky eaters and sugar-driven misbehaviors, the Super Nanny of Food would be on-hand to navigate challenges from the grocery aisle to the dinner table: how to feed a family of four on food stamps; how to have a fresh, nutritious dinner on the table every day; how to change your children’s snacking habits.

Instead of arguing between the pork belly and the doughnut, it might be time to introduce the chef back to the people. What does today’s celebrity food culture say about Americans? Are food celebrities indicative of how people actually choose to eat?

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5 Featured Comments

  • irinishki

    irinishki said 6 years ago Featured

    That Super-Nanny-meets-Alice-Waters figure does exist. He is from the UK, his name is Jamie Oliver and his show is called Food Revolution. He tried to educate people, using a grassroots approach, here in the states on how to chose healthier alternatives instead of fast food and snacks loaded with sugar. Unfortunately, his show was canceled after two episodes because of poor ratings and replaced by repeats of Dancing with the Stars. What does that say about our food culture?

  • Rafencat

    Rafencat said 6 years ago Featured

    Thank you for quite eloquently stating what needed to be blogged! I only wish that the foodies on television could read it. I agree that being a foodie is not a bad thing, however with the economy, the realities of navigating the grocery store and super stores and the need to feed your family with food that will not eventually have a negative effect on their health is complex. The reality is that it can be done, there is hope and the need for new recipes that work on a tight budget can be found. The hardest part about feeding a family is the availability of real food vs fast food or boxed varieties. I honestly think the food network needs to re-evaluate what programming they are using to represent their ideals. It's fantastic to get lost in an episode of Iron Chef America, however the reality of making something Ina Garten shows on her program is slim to none for the average homemaker or wife. Economically speaking, even Paula Deen is out of touch with what is possible for the average family. Thank you again for writing this...I have found it inspirationan and thought provoking!

  • saltcityspice

    saltcityspice said 6 years ago Featured

    I watch cooking shows and cook regularly. Like my food choices, however, I prefer my food programming to be free of filler & over-processing. Bourdain's show typifies this for me - he continually makes the point that the thing that unifies all of us is the need to use our surroundings to feed ourselves, and if possible, make it taste good while doing so.

  • riversongrapture

    riversongrapture said 6 years ago Featured

    this is an interesting article that should stoke some good family discussions & introspection. Why is it that the majority of Americans love food tv but dont carry it through to their daily lives? I think there are quite a fwe factors that lend to these circumstances - many of which hae been discussed in other comments here. But something that stands out to me when I think about this is the pace in which most Americans currently live their lives. It is hard to prepare homemade meals from scratch when you are racing home from work to gulp down some food at some record setting pace just in time to race off to the next event. I think choosing to slow down the pace of our lives, allowing us to breathe a little, and take the time to think through and prepare healthy homecooked meals would serve us all well!

  • TheLittleRagamuffin

    TheLittleRagamuffin said 6 years ago Featured

    What my husband and I put into our bodies was so important to us that we started our own organic small scale farm. It is sad and ironic that at the end of the day after tending all those organic food stuffs I am too tired to turn them into the delicious meals they should be. I still cook seven days of the week but I am most typically disappointed in my performance.

117 comments

  • OnlyOriginalsByAJ

    OnlyOriginalsByAJ said 6 years ago

    I think you bring up a lot of good questions and I hate to say that sometimes I fall victim to food celebrities suggestions. I'm a big fan of Anthony Bourdain and Gordon Ramsey and I've found myself buying their cookbooks soley due to the fact that their name is on the cover. But, I do need to add that they have not disappointed. I don't have children, so I can't understand the additional responsibilties that go along with trying to teach them healthy food habits, I am, however, an athelete and understand the importance of healthy decisions. I think this is something that more celebrity chef (and families for that matter) need to focus on. Thanks for sharing the article!!

  • ChrissiesRibbons

    ChrissiesRibbons said 6 years ago

    A fascinating article! I almost compulsively collect cook books and found as a singleton or when it was just me and my husband these were fantastic tomes to refer to. However with two toddlers, I now crave someone who will address the issues you have mentioned regarding feeding a family on a low budget with healthy, nutritious food.

  • paramountvintage

    paramountvintage said 6 years ago

    wow, only 2 out of 5 americans prepare home cooked meals. what a shock! i'm glad i not only grow but love to cook my own food :)

  • mandymoomoo

    mandymoomoo said 6 years ago

    I love to cook, but struggle to find time... bring on the super food nanny!

  • sparrowgrey

    sparrowgrey said 6 years ago

    Would love to have more time to cook, but we do our best. Not always super healthy but almost always home cooked.

  • Colettesboutique

    Colettesboutique said 6 years ago

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this article. I absolutely love collecting cookbooks of all kinds, as someone who loves to cook different things. I would really like that "super food nanny" to pay me a visit :-)

  • Verdurebydesign

    Verdurebydesign said 6 years ago

    Danielle, I'm shocked that only 2 out of 5 prepare home cooked meals. Has life got that fast that we have lost basic skills? I hope not.

  • baublesnfripperies

    baublesnfripperies said 6 years ago

    Oh my gosh, great article. This has been my favorite so far. I would love a super food nanny to visit me! Someone to teach me how to cook healthy food and snack more healthfully as a poor college student with limited time.

  • peaseblossomstudio

    peaseblossomstudio said 6 years ago

    I must confess that I am planning to eat canned soup for dinner tonight--but it's organic! :D I am often shocked by how few people can actually put together a meal and enjoy doing it. I love the challenge of making dinner out of "nothing", which often involves beans, rice, or eggs (and organic vegetables!), but I know exactly what is going in my meal and it's always tasty. Cooking should be a life skill taught somewhere along the way along with driver's ed and reading.

  • jennie54s7

    jennie54s7 said 6 years ago

    I love the newfound exposure of cooking to the people through the internet and television. As a new mom, I am always on the internet finding healhier ways of cooking and preparing food for my little one. People will always be who they are, and many treat cooking like a spectator sport if only they had "more time". Luckily, I do have that time and make most meals most days at home and save a ton of money in the process and feel more satisfied with my checkbook and creativity.

  • jlrdesigns

    jlrdesigns said 6 years ago

    Very fascinating article and great article! I think the paradox speaks to how much Americans simply love to EAT. If you spend time on Pinterest, you also see this same paradox in action - there are so many food pins. And I have to confess, I have a foodie pin board filled with delicious-looking meals; however, I have only actually taken the time to make 1 of the recipies

  • LaBellaJoya

    LaBellaJoya said 6 years ago

    I actually caught the original article and read what Bourdain said regarding Paula Deen. It was extremely inappropriate. Her food is not the healthiest, but neither is drinking yourself into a stupor which happens regularly on Bourdain's show. Everything in moderation I say.

  • shannondzikas

    shannondzikas said 6 years ago

    I finally made my first quiche today, ironically after getting rid of my T.V. a few weeks ago. If I still hat the Food Network I'd be watching someone else make dinner while throwing some frozen junk in a pan. Great to think about.

  • MarilynsMedley

    MarilynsMedley said 6 years ago

    I'm a Gordan Ramsey fan and get excited about dishes shown on his show but come down off my high when remember only cooking for myself. So back to the homemade tacos and meatloaf. Anything that I can reheat for a few days.

  • ItchinStitchin

    ItchinStitchin said 6 years ago

    Very interesting article. I love to cook homemade meals and actually cried when we lost power for 6 days due to the hurricane, it forced us to eat out more than I would have liked. I think my family eats healthier than most. Are we a household full of size zero people? No! Are we healthy and active? Yes. I think to call Paula Deen a "menace" to Americans is a little over the top. After all everyone has choices we are not sheep that just follow what we see on TV. If that was the case I think Jersey Shore should be banned. Lets remember the main rule - everything in moderation. Eating not enough fat is just as bad as eating too much. Eating too much is just as bad as eating too little.

  • SimplyMaco

    SimplyMaco said 6 years ago

    My usual fix to the "I want to eat homemade but that takes tiiiiiiiime" problem is to set aside a Saturday or Sunday to cook a few soups/stews and a grain or two from Veganomicon, then into the freezer they go to feed me for the next month or so of lazy evenings.

  • LittleWrenPottery

    LittleWrenPottery said 6 years ago

    I'm from the UK and probably have a different take on this but generally I find them to be a force for both good and bad. Bad that they choose to indulge our desire for high fat and salt diets but good that they can make us more socially aware. I think that's the difference between home cooks and chefs, indulgence!

  • artemisartdesign

    artemisartdesign said 6 years ago

    I just loved the article. I enjoy very much cooking at home, but usually i don,t have time as much as i would like. i also like to try new menus...

  • gatelinesalsa

    gatelinesalsa said 6 years ago

    As a vintage cookbook collector (and I mean a huge a collection) which dominates all my bookshelves in my den. I love to be insired by the "good ole days" and prepare old fashioned meals at least four nights a week. We even eat together as a family around our big, beat up farm house table. I think that my kids ages 9, 7, and 5 benefit greatly from seeing well balanced meals and family surrounding them with regularity. I also grow a giant garden and can and freeze my veggies. LOVE this article, you are totally speaking to my heart and my passion!!

  • feyzayazar

    feyzayazar said 6 years ago

    This is a topic I too am interested in! I'm currently curating an exhibition in Melbourne, Gluttony & the Gourmand, on the topic of Australia's obsession with food, dining and the cult of the celebrity chef! It seems to be a topical issue/trend in many developed countries. Thanks for sharing insight into the foodie habits of Americans.

  • bhangtiez

    bhangtiez said 6 years ago

    Great read! Thanks for sharing!

  • MegansMenagerie

    MegansMenagerie said 6 years ago

    I love being able to cook for my family. I do the best I can right now since school is back in session. Thank goodness I graduate in December! After that I can really focus on my family and nutrition needs. It's so important to me.

  • VintageEye

    VintageEye said 6 years ago

    Fresh, simply prepared food does not require a celebrity chef. Grandma had it down pretty well. :)

  • BlackStar

    BlackStar said 6 years ago

    We have the food channels on a lot in our home, except when it's football season. We both cook and bake and have learned a few things from watching the tube.

  • myvintagecrush

    myvintagecrush said 6 years ago

    well, I tend to read blogs and frequent some great online resources for my menus! real life food!

  • vintagejane

    vintagejane said 6 years ago

    I think everything in moderation is key, with a focus on fruits and veggies. Great article!!!!

  • mylenefoster

    mylenefoster said 6 years ago

    I think I watch cooking shows of food I like to eat. I get ideas and it inspires me to cook healthy food. I pick up the techniques and ingredients to prepare other recipes. This builds up on itself and I acquire a good habit to keep.

  • JasmineLund

    JasmineLund said 6 years ago

    I've never watched food TV shows - we have a television, but we only use it for videos and DVDs. Only in recent years have we started paying attention to food bloggers and awesome magazines like Cook's Country (although my Mom started getting Taste of Home when it first began, until it started being more commercial than food - ugh!) So many people today are so anxious to go eco-friendly, health-friendly, you name it. As the sixth of eleven children, I never knew what it was like to eat junk food, to eat out more than once a month. My dad has often had to work two jobs to support his family, and it takes an amazing wife to support him. Mom has often been stretched thinner than thin imagining new ways to make low-budget meals. Homemade starts in the kitchen. Handmade starts in the kitchen. Growing up, we always called store-bought bread (or any other baked goods purchased at the supermarket), "fake". And we still do. Handmade means real. Yet, despite being forced, as it were, to exercise our ingenuity in the kitchen, that does not subtract from its attractiveness as an art. I'm never happier than when I have a full day of baking and cooking ahead of me, seasoned with many moments talking things over with my sibs (who are always home, as the younger ones are home schooled). On which subject (and I know I'm deviating miles from the topic you're addressing), I've always heard people from different backgrounds talk about home scholars being socially deficient. Excuse me? Sure, I get uncomfortable in a crowd of public schooled kids, but that's because THEY don't know how to talk, to converse face-to-face with people. They're so busy, so fascinated with their hand-held electronics that they cannot see those around them. Talk about being lonely in a crowd. Yet at home, we discuss practically everything at the drop of a hat - and because everyone joins in, the younger kids know perfectly well how to speak to mature adults. What a blessing! Okay, so my rabbit trail is done. Seriously, good subject matter here. I love looking at pictures of food, and imagining making them... and then making them for reals someday. I just think it's sad that the kitchen heroes aren't simply, for every person, Mom.

  • fbstudiovt

    fbstudiovt said 6 years ago

    As a latch key kid in the 80's with no cable television, I taught myself how to cook by watching Julia Child, the Frugal Gourmet, and Yan Can Cook on Boston's PBS station. I also raided all of the cookbooks in my house (not many) and figured out how to make all sorts of substitutions since I didn't have easy access to the grocery store while mom was working. It was either that or spaghetti-os, which I detested. Turns out it was the best education I could have asked for! Learning these skills as a kid kept the fear factor down for me as I grew older. I cooked up a storm in college and have continued to do so as an adult while many of my peers never learned. My best friend just found out at 27 years old that her cholesterol is 3 times what it should be, and so we now have cooking dates at my house where I teach her the basics of how to cook different kind of vegetables, tofu, beans, grains (can you tell I'm a vegetarian?) and what kind of cooking method works for different ingredients. It's such a surprise how little she knows besides how to fry meat and mash potatoes. My advice? Cook with your kids! Advocate for cooking in schools and after school programs! If you're not much of a cook, take a class (and take your kid/s if you have them). It's a life skill that seems to have gone by the wayside...

  • tennyoceres

    tennyoceres said 6 years ago

    I understand what Anthony Bourdain is saying. I feel like getting heart attacks just watching a few minutes of Paula Deen's show. But sometimes I want to make my own fried chicken and damn it Paula Deen's fried chicken recipe sure looks good. Please note I love Anthony Bourdain and watch his show religiously. I believe in giving into your cravings ("I want a cheeseburger for lunch. Maybe I'll get a slider."), but don't go overboard in satisfying them ("OOOH A DOUBLE DOUBLE CHEESEBURGER WITH SHAKE NOM NOM NOM").

  • TheScarfTree

    TheScarfTree said 6 years ago

    Thanks for your article - always enjoy reading it!

  • sarahknight

    sarahknight said 6 years ago

    Apparently, I'm one of the 40% of people in the Harris poll that cooks food at home regularly. My household eats out about 5-7 times a year. I can't say that I watch any cooking shows, that's just not my thing... and I can't say that I take painstaking joy in cooking. But then, I vacuum too, and shower. At some point in time there is a point at which you acknowledge that things like eating, hygiene, and domesticity are just facts of life — and you just do them without belaboring the task with contemplation. That said, I've seen some pretty neat things on cooking shows, in the scant amount of time that I've watched them. There's a cinnamon-chocolate frosting that I have yet to make that sits in the back of my mind. And I think it was Paula Dean who had an awesome recipe for a spread made of cream cheese, apple butter, and cinnamon. We love it the 4-5 times a year I get around to making it. It's really good on oat-nut bread. To the extent of common sense — to each their own. We are all individuals and we have different DNA and therefore different dietary needs. We all don't fit the same mould or require exactly the same thing. There is not one path or one solution to food consumption.

  • TheBerryPress

    TheBerryPress said 6 years ago

    It's funny how we have so many food shows and less and less time to cook. Thanks for the article. I love Anthony Bourdain and Paula Deen.

  • AurDenDesigns

    AurDenDesigns said 6 years ago

    Culturally we tend to view food differently. Moderation is always a safe way to approach our preparation and consumption not giving up what gives us joy. I have to say I enjoy both shows considerably.

  • whatnomints

    whatnomints said 6 years ago

    Like anything else, you have to just work a home cooked meal into your schedule. My boyfriend and I (both in our early 20s) cook dinner together at least 5x per week - We prepare meals inspired by any and every cuisine (Italian, American, Indian, Greek ... you name it) from scratch (I swear, our spice cabinet would rival that of any top chef!). Finding time to cook and eat together usually means that we end up sitting down at the table around 9pm once our daily jobs are finished - I know it's late, but it's what works for us. I love cooking my meals because it means I know where my food comes from and what goes into each dish. Of course this doesn't mean we don't love to indulge in take-out or a food truck here and there, but eating out occasionally only serves to inspire our cooking at home even more! I don't think I wholeheartedly agree with either Tony or Paula, but food is an inspiration, an experience - It's supposed to be fun! Not taken so literally :)

  • AlpineGypsy

    AlpineGypsy said 6 years ago

    The only thing I can say for sure, is that home-cooking has fallen victim to our time-starved culture. People seem to be so rushed, and it's odd that something so important as nourishing ourselves has become a 'luxury'. No judgement here; just the belief that if more folks weren't so pressed in their daily lives, we might have healthier kids growing up. But it is the way North Americans do their thing. I'm happy to say that I enjoy cooking, but only when I have the time to really let my creativity expand. That doesn't always happen for me when I get home late from work, and just need something to eat! But I always strive to find the time. Most of the time, it works. *wink* Greasy fried chicken is just so ubiquitous in the fast-food world, that it wouldn't be my first choice if I had the time & inclination to prepare something yummy. But that's just me. Thought-provoking article, thanks! Heidi

  • lauraslastditch

    lauraslastditch said 6 years ago

    Yes, your description of the perfect food show host sounds wonderful! I don't watch cooking shows, yet I cook daily. I wonder how much overlap there is between cooking show watchers, and regular cookers?

  • curiousfool

    curiousfool said 6 years ago

    It is indeed sad that more people do not cook at home, for themselves. Having food allergies, I would say my meals are home-cooked 6-7 nights a week. Eating out is just too difficult. Before getting rid of my cable service, I used to be one of those Food Network junkies- and to be honest, it's the channel I miss the most. Whether I could cook the food or not, regardless of the chef, I was inspired to different combinations of spices, different vegetables I otherwise would not have attempted. I completely agree with @whatnomints- food is supposed to be fun! Take the time you would be watching TV (to "decompress")- and spend some time chopping onions, or searing steak, or even just scrambling eggs. Visit your local farmers market, and eat what you like. You'll be amazed how much healthier you eat when you discover how delicious fresh food is regardless of how you cook it. On a side note, my spouse and I have already decided to have family cooking night at least one night a week- a way to spend time together as a family, teach our kids how to fend for themselves in the kitchen, and have fun preparing good food. Food is a social thing- treat cooking the same way.

  • dbabcock

    dbabcock said 6 years ago

    Wow, this one really generated a lot of lengthy discussion. I, too, like to have a home-cooked meal from food that I know where it came from. Luckily, I live in an area where I know ranchers who raise their own cattle, chickens, pigs and lamb...but unluckily, we have a very short growing season for the vegetables -- 59 days, to be exact. So I grow what I can, try to preserve it as best as I can and enjoy the fresh stuff for the few weeks of the year that it is available from my backyard garden.

  • adoreneko

    adoreneko said 6 years ago

    Food celebrities are indicative of how people want their dream foods to look like and the competition really makes chefs want to be the best. The foods made by celebrity chefs seems to cater a lot to what the public wants plus a little twist.

  • JillianReneDecor

    JillianReneDecor said 6 years ago

    Great read - lots of food for thought

  • magicjelly

    magicjelly said 6 years ago

    It would have been pretty easy to write this article without the US-centric angle. Most blogs seem to have a good grip on the fact that the internet is a global space. Etsy's blog in particular should be mindful of that, considering they have such a large non-US customer base.

  • factorygirlashli

    factorygirlashli said 6 years ago

    I've been lucky enough to meet Alice Waters and see Anthony Bourdain in "concert". It's nice to see that there are chefs who appreciate food for food's sake. My biggest annoyance in culinary school was telling people I wanted to open a bakery, and they would immediately bring up their favorite Food Network show. Is there no more cooking for eating's sake anymore? Does it have to be for entertainment in order to be valid?

  • tiltomorrow

    tiltomorrow said 6 years ago

    I grew up in the country and it was a treat to go out to dinner. We had gardens and canned veggies and berries for jam. We had cattle and hogs and had our side of beef and pork. I was not a fan of the beef and pork. I would not eat it. I started cooking when I was in grade school up until I left home. Now I hardly cook. Every now and then I will do something and it will surprise someone. In our area, we are in the worst drought ever. There is a local farmers market, but it is not from here. The local farmers having been driving to South Texas and bring the produce to sell at the market. I enjoy home cooked meals and cooking my mom's recipes. She is the bomb! I don't like the cooking shows. Great feed back from everyone.

  • McCoyToys

    McCoyToys said 6 years ago

    I enjoy home cooking our meals.....we are fortunate to have fresh vegetables that I can prepare or preserve for later use. Nothing beats a pot of home-made stew or soup simmering on the stove all day. We all would be much healthier if there was less processed food put into our bodies...it is amazing the difference it makes in the health of children as well as adults.

  • Officeboy01

    Officeboy01 said 6 years ago

    What an interesting article and comments from the readers. Entertainment cooking is what I would consider the cooking shows on TV.

  • Officeboy01

    Officeboy01 said 6 years ago

    I like homecooking in the winter, you know when you are bundled up in your coat. Staying warm and eating a good bowl of homemade soup--yum

  • irinishki

    irinishki said 6 years ago Featured

    That Super-Nanny-meets-Alice-Waters figure does exist. He is from the UK, his name is Jamie Oliver and his show is called Food Revolution. He tried to educate people, using a grassroots approach, here in the states on how to chose healthier alternatives instead of fast food and snacks loaded with sugar. Unfortunately, his show was canceled after two episodes because of poor ratings and replaced by repeats of Dancing with the Stars. What does that say about our food culture?

  • Officeboy01

    Officeboy01 said 6 years ago

    Did anybody see the house on Craft + Style Blogosphere: 9/8/2011. Now I can imagine you would have to learn how to cook to stay fed. The location looks really like a tough place to stay warm.

  • JMMStudios

    JMMStudios said 6 years ago

    My mom is a wonderful cook and I learned so much from her. Now I work in a restaurant and am learning a whole new set of cooking skills. I think food should be enjoyed- eating and making. I also think moderation is key. Thanks for the article, I find this a fascinating topic.

  • HeirloomOrphanage

    HeirloomOrphanage said 6 years ago

    Very interesting article! I read the original article about Bourdain and his comment about Deen was quite out of line. I don't own a TV and do not watch "Food" programs. Apparently Bourdain and Deen are simply two different types of celebrity chefs. Cooking can be entertaining but I object to the simple art of preparing good food to be put to a contest of personalities. Julia Child was entertaining and a celebrity but she understood the true meaning of preparing and eating good food with a wonderful touch of class.

  • prudies

    prudies said 6 years ago

    Good point @irinishki. Jamie Oliver is doing great work, and he needs to be supported. We need someone who will truly inspire home chefs to cook healthfully -- low sugar, whole grains, locally sourced meats and produce. I just wrote a blog post on this: http://www.mamaliciousinthecity.com/2011/09/01/clean-eating/

  • Rafencat

    Rafencat said 6 years ago Featured

    Thank you for quite eloquently stating what needed to be blogged! I only wish that the foodies on television could read it. I agree that being a foodie is not a bad thing, however with the economy, the realities of navigating the grocery store and super stores and the need to feed your family with food that will not eventually have a negative effect on their health is complex. The reality is that it can be done, there is hope and the need for new recipes that work on a tight budget can be found. The hardest part about feeding a family is the availability of real food vs fast food or boxed varieties. I honestly think the food network needs to re-evaluate what programming they are using to represent their ideals. It's fantastic to get lost in an episode of Iron Chef America, however the reality of making something Ina Garten shows on her program is slim to none for the average homemaker or wife. Economically speaking, even Paula Deen is out of touch with what is possible for the average family. Thank you again for writing this...I have found it inspirationan and thought provoking!

  • DarlingDesignsbyTNG

    DarlingDesignsbyTNG said 6 years ago

    I love the cooking shows they each have there own appeal but when it comes to my own kitchen it comes down to what is somewhat healthy and what the kids will eat and thank goodness they love to eat varied things. My little foodistas.

  • izzerdoodle

    izzerdoodle said 6 years ago

    Great article! I've never really gotten the whole food celebrity thing. It's been a long time since I've watched Food Network, but I do own a Rachel Ray cookbook or two. Not that I use them. I'm one of those who makes simple dinners when we aren't getting takeout. What I really love is baking! Not always the healthiest, but my family and friends really enjoy it, and I love putting smiles on their faces with the food I create. A super food nanny would be welcome in this house, get us a little more on track. Could use some help with my picky toddler!

  • auntemilie

    auntemilie said 6 years ago

    I would rather cook then bring in prepared foods or eat out. I like knowing what is in my food. The Harris Poll results on one hand are a surprise to me taking into consideration the state of the economy.

  • gbugsmom

    gbugsmom said 6 years ago

    I cook every day and love it. While I don't use many recipes I do get lots of tips from cooking shows and the internet. Mostly I just buy what's fresh and local. I figure if I like it, I'll throw it in - how bad could it be? For pure entertainment I recommend My Drunk Kitchen. You won't want to attempt the 'recipes' but you'll be laughing so much you won't mind. Check it out - Hannah Hart is hilarious!

  • SunnyDayDiggs

    SunnyDayDiggs said 6 years ago

    A go to here at my house is, Dr Andrew Weil.com...health and recipes. and yes, please bring back Jamie Oliver! Great article! Paradox indeed.

  • mygigigirl

    mygigigirl said 6 years ago

    I am one of those people that cooks and loves it, but then again I got to retire at an early age. Yes, Paula is a butter lover, but she and others have at least shown the younger people some things they could easily learn to do that they may not ever have been exposed to at home. I for one have learned so much about fine dining and about foods and preparation that I would not have known without those programs. I agree that moderation is the key. Enjoying good food whether it is gourmet or home cooking is a wonderful thing with your family and friends and I think the shows give courage to some to try new things.

  • JennysFunCreations

    JennysFunCreations said 6 years ago

    Wow, I wish I knew how to cook. I never learned how.

  • saltcityspice

    saltcityspice said 6 years ago Featured

    I watch cooking shows and cook regularly. Like my food choices, however, I prefer my food programming to be free of filler & over-processing. Bourdain's show typifies this for me - he continually makes the point that the thing that unifies all of us is the need to use our surroundings to feed ourselves, and if possible, make it taste good while doing so.

  • katrinaalana

    katrinaalana said 6 years ago

    I enjoy watching Anthony Bourdain’s show a lot. I try to cook whenever I can but the recipes I know are only my favorite dishes so I don't get much variety. There's this great hawker center or food court near my place that serves great food for cheap prices. I can get a gourmet duck meal for only a few dollars.

  • byhandstringlights

    byhandstringlights said 6 years ago

    Thanks for your article!

  • Iammie

    Iammie said 6 years ago

    Interesting article!

  • AliceCloset

    AliceCloset said 6 years ago

    I love cooking at home!! Especially cakes and cookies...my obsession! Thank you for this article

  • MagaSuit

    MagaSuit said 6 years ago

    We like this blog very much! And we love Travel chanell too! We change our opion about food after trip in India, how food and water are valuable.

  • studiorandom

    studiorandom said 6 years ago

    The trouble with Paula Deen isn't that she cooks with butter. The problem is that she cooks with sugar and grains. I know how I feel with butter in my diet versus how I feel with sugar and grains in my diet--yes, even the hearthealthywhole ones. And those are quite possibly worse; on top of jacking up my blood sugar, they leach minerals out of my body. The few months I tried going vegan, about six years ago, I ate lots and lots of whole grains. They made me fatter and crazy. But I've gotten much better in the past three or four years and can even weather a certain amount of junk food now and I realized the big difference was I've been eating butter, cream, and coconut oil in that time, and dropped 90% of the sugar. That's it. It doesn't always help my weight if I eat too much starch, but it's a huge change for me. And you know, ever since this country lost its collective mind and decided that foods we've been eating for thousands to millions of years are killing us, we've all gotten sicker. Hasn't anyone noticed? The standard industrial diet IS a plant-based diet. Well, that didn't work so now we have to redefine what we mean by plants. Now it's got to be whole grains. Well, that didn't work, people are getting celiac, so maybe we need more veggies. Wait, we're constantly hungry now. OK, well, we can eat more fat but it has to be olive oil. Whoops, we're still getting fat and now we're going diabetic too. Why's that? Oh, we're not getting enough veggies. Oh wait, now they have to be fresh. Next year someone will figure out all that fresh spinach is giving people kidney stones and the fresh broccoli is killing our thyroids. Then I suppose it'll be back to tofu again. Hasn't anyone had enough yet?

  • angelswithwings

    angelswithwings said 6 years ago

    someone commeted on Paula Deen cooking with butter, I have heard that it's better healthier for us to cook with real butter instead of margarine. I think we can make just about any thing healthy, even pizza.

  • dekoprojects

    dekoprojects said 6 years ago

    I absolutely loved Anthony Bourdain show :) But I cannot understand how anyone could follow food-celebrities instructions. Many people in Poland like to watch such programmes but they'd rather do something traditional for dinner. When we want to be more experimental in the kitchen we use our friends' recipes and advices or look for something new in the Internet :) TV-chefs propositions are usually treated as curiosities. This is why programmes about both travelling and food are more popular.

  • Blinkett

    Blinkett said 6 years ago

    @angelswithwings I use real butter in my cooking as well. However, it is the quantity of butter that Paula Deen uses that is frightening. Sandra Lee's cooking is gag worthy. That woman does not deserve to be listed with the rest of them. Frankly I have found much better recipes on Etsy than ever on the food network channel.

  • NattersSushi

    NattersSushi said 6 years ago

    I make all the meals in the family....let me tell you I don't think a working person would be able to do it. Today's society demands way too much to get ahead and truthfully the only reason I am able to make all the meals is because I have that spare time.....not that it doesn't take up most of my day! I am the food provider in the family and my boyfriend is the "suga daddy" so to speak. He only likes home-cooked meals; the only frozen food we have is meat and vegetables from the garden.....

  • yimmekedesign

    yimmekedesign said 6 years ago

    Think of the celebrities who actually have a cook who prepares their daily meals, like Oprah. Hasn't she been struggling for years with her weight and all the drama with it? How about Kristie Alley? Wouldn't you think she would have more money and resources to keep her meals as healthy, organic and nutritious as possible? Or how about the unbalanced celebs who are paper thin because they decided that fame is more important than health and happiness? I do not go with fads from anybody except the ones from my granddaddy: 1. He never ate out ( because he did not know if they washed their hands properly...) 2. He thought milk was only for a calf and babies. 3. Every morning he ate a slice of whole brown bread with cheese, no butter, a piece of garlic and a cup of tea. 4.Loads of fruit and veggies. 5. ...and one glass of home made cherry wine every evening with supper. He is MY celebrity cook.

  • inthesew

    inthesew said 6 years ago

    Those numbers don't indicate that few cook. "just two out of five prepare home-cooked meals five or more times a week" In our house, with a 3 yr old who is picky about cooked food but will eat fresh fruits and veggies all day long, and two adults one of which has a work schedule that does not allow for much cooking during the week- that makes for left-over home cooked meals that were not "prepared" each time.

  • AmberGypsySky

    AmberGypsySky said 6 years ago

    This is perfect! It figures that cooking a nice meal from scratch has become a spectator sport for America...at this though, I am not surprised. Can't wait to leave America lol

  • mozaicgirl1

    mozaicgirl1 said 6 years ago

    We all have the power to choose, and although the cooking network is entertaining(i'm addicted), becoming educated and seeking correct info is our responsibility. A few good books that i have read recently, Crazy Sexy Diet, by Kris Carr and The Thrive Diet, by Brendan Brazier are extremely informative. Don't let the word diet in their titles cause you to roll your eyes...they are both about lifestyle change, and teaches you how to slowly incorporate these changes.

  • redzshadow

    redzshadow said 6 years ago

    I grew up cooking and I cook all the time. I am shocked at the number of people who do not cook. My cooking habits have changed and grown over the years. At the current state of things I am eating a vegan diet. So, bean preparation takes a few days but it has become part of my cooking routine. Even when I was single and worked like crazy, I always cooked for myself. I find it relaxing and rewarding.

  • HolidayJubilee

    HolidayJubilee said 6 years ago

    I love watching Anthony Bourdain, and Paula Deen, but honestly, I don't have time for labor intensive cooking. I just want to make something quick and easy and get back to other things. I do try to eat healthier than I used to, and I cook at home 5-6 times a week, only because I was laid off from my job and can't afford to eat out as often. I should say that when I was younger and my kids were little, I cooked every night, but now that it's just me and my older teen son, I'm tired of cooking and sometimes sandwiches are good enough :)

  • kathyjohnson3

    kathyjohnson3 said 6 years ago

    I love to cook but even with being a "stay at home" person I'm usually to busy with my Etsy shop to make fancy meals, that's where the crock pot comes in. There are so many cook books out there just for slow cooking and the recipes are delicious!

  • lovelyfeverboutique

    lovelyfeverboutique said 6 years ago

    This was a really great article and brought up some relevant points. Although I make home-cooked meals on a regular basis (mostly from economic necessity), I would like to see a "food celebrity" actually address things like serving nutritious meals on a budget. The fact is that feeding a family does take time and money and many of us have too little of both those things. If someone came out with a television show addressing those challenges, it would really have a positive effect on a lot of households.

  • YarnUiPhoneApp

    YarnUiPhoneApp said 6 years ago

    I grew up watching a lot of TV too...and I feel pretty nostalgic about what shows I adored during that time...they were so innocent compared to the stuff that's on there now. I also don't own a TV now...but i don't miss it. I love watching cooking shows when I'm staying in a hotel...which is like once or twice a year. A real treat. Then I don't miss going out at all. It's like I OD on TV during that time. Eat, knit and watch cooking shows. MMmmm good!

  • destroymodernart

    destroymodernart said 6 years ago

    I usually cook everyday, but when i worked full time by dinner time my feet were sore from standing all day and i was too tired to cook. I think that something like a family based restaurant thats run for the benefit of working people (especially single parents) rather than profit would be a good idea. Where you could get cheap healthy meals and the people that worked there would get a fair wage. Instead of that we have fast food places that sacrifice the customers health to make a profit.

  • ohbabydotcom

    ohbabydotcom said 6 years ago

    looks good :)

  • squibbles76

    squibbles76 said 6 years ago

    Yes, "use our surroundings to feed ourselves"..I come from West Texas. If I chose to feed off of my surroundings I would be eating: nightshade, yucca root, mesquite beans, um lizard, ants, dirt, sand....yeah not so tasty and NO that part of Texas does not have veggie markets or homegrown markets. You can not grow anything in that dirt as it is tainted with oil field. Wal-mart and HEB and a few locally owned grocery stores is where you get your food in West Texas. I like all the cooking shows as it does inspire me to adapt their recipes with what I know and can afford or might have on hand. Food is so much better when made with the real ingreds. instead of a box, but those box foods can be real good to those who can not afford to buy the separate ingreds. Yes that Bourdain is a bit of a "food snob" and yes, I like Paula Dean y'all, Sarah Lee and Giada got it goin on for the real world house wives, economically they rock. Rachel Ray, love her meals, but I think she sold out by having her own talk show now. She is less of a fave for me anymore. I am all for nutritious, tasty meals for under $10 dollars. Can it be done? Well, I think so if you choose one week to buy food staples such as flour, milk, eggs, bread, butter or substitute, corn meal, or wheat flours, salt n pepper, and a few herbs and spices, tomato sauce, potatoes, onion, carrots, celery, veggie oil or olive oil, beans and rice. You can do so much with these basics and then add to with chicken or beef.

  • spicedish

    spicedish said 6 years ago

    I just have to comment on your statement "Instead of arguing between the pork belly and the doughnut..." There is a restaurant in my neighborhood (The Mission District of San Francisco) that serves yes.... a pork belly donut.

  • littleeyedesigns

    littleeyedesigns said 6 years ago

    Great article! We cook at home and enjoy planning our meals frequently - sometimes during particularly busy weeks we are so guilty of eating out WAY too many times but now that we are saving to buy a house it is ALL about the 'gastronomie chez nous.' I grew up eating pretty cruddy food - sometimes we would go all out and have a real, planned meal, but for the most part it was boiled broccoli, mac n cheese, nachos, and lots and lots of overcooked spaghetti. Kids don't eat well because a lot of parents don't know how to make food taste good! If I had a nickel for every kid under 5 whose favorite food was hot dogs... well, I'd have a bunch of nickels. The truth is - cooking at home is good for the environment (the amount of waste in restaurants is HUGE - trust me, even at the 'conscientious' ones, I've worked there!), it's good for relationships, and it's good fo' yo' health. I'm not a mommy yet but one day I'll be damned if I don't at least try to pass cooking knowledge on to my kiddos! I had to learn it myself, for the most part, during and after college. A particularly food-savvy ex-boyfriend was a huge help in that. Now, if I could just figure out how to bake... that's the hard one. :)

  • riversongrapture

    riversongrapture said 6 years ago Featured

    this is an interesting article that should stoke some good family discussions & introspection. Why is it that the majority of Americans love food tv but dont carry it through to their daily lives? I think there are quite a fwe factors that lend to these circumstances - many of which hae been discussed in other comments here. But something that stands out to me when I think about this is the pace in which most Americans currently live their lives. It is hard to prepare homemade meals from scratch when you are racing home from work to gulp down some food at some record setting pace just in time to race off to the next event. I think choosing to slow down the pace of our lives, allowing us to breathe a little, and take the time to think through and prepare healthy homecooked meals would serve us all well!

  • applesandanklebiters

    applesandanklebiters said 6 years ago

    I think what we eat and the obesity/health problems can be contributed to a nation that lives with an electronic device in their hand if not both. Sugar, grains, and most anything made natural/organic isn't going to cause health issues. Moderation is the key factor.. eating, electronics and exercise! ;) I believe we need to get off our computers and take our kids outside and have a picnic with butter cookies and sugar sweetened lemonade. Take a hike in the woods and bring along some goodies. Sweet food+family= Sweet Memories.

  • TheLittleRagamuffin

    TheLittleRagamuffin said 6 years ago Featured

    What my husband and I put into our bodies was so important to us that we started our own organic small scale farm. It is sad and ironic that at the end of the day after tending all those organic food stuffs I am too tired to turn them into the delicious meals they should be. I still cook seven days of the week but I am most typically disappointed in my performance.

  • ethanollie

    ethanollie said 6 years ago

    This is perhaps one of the most well written posts to date on Etsy. One that is well thought out, eloquently written and presented without giving us the answer, but rather, inspiring us to think about a potential solution. Kudos!

  • pitterpattertutus

    pitterpattertutus said 6 years ago

    Interesting views, I think a lot since I've become a better and more adventurous cook about just this divide: How can these programs be so popular and yet home cooked meals are on the decline while obesity is on such a drastic spike up!? I love your solution of a mid-range food celebrity (especially having fed two healthily off of food stamps while maintaining a varied menu!) and would be an avid viewer (through streaming of course...)!

  • Mclovebuddy

    Mclovebuddy said 6 years ago

    i don't mind having a wide variety of food shows and think it's great that triple fried recipes exist out there. there's a place for them only not at every meal. the new crop of shows feels like it's following the reality tv route - there's not a lot of reality to them, but simply hyperbole. i'm not sure if that will swing back to something more realistic or if food will become the next info-tainment. i love food shows, but find it difficult to enjoy many of the newer ones.

  • xsilk

    xsilk said 6 years ago

    I love a good meal prepared from fresh ingredients. I think most of people are like me, but often cannot find enough time to prepare a proper meal. I sometimes get sucked into watching cooking shows, but I know I only watch them to feed my own desire to cook with my own hands. Some food shows are educational, but many are eye-candy or as entertaining as a cheap magazine. I think love and appreciation of cooking is something you grow up with and if you had plenty of home cooking growing up, you will want the same thing when you are an adult. Food is such a basic thing, and what you watch on tv probably won't much influence your food behaviors. Cooking show is just what it is, it's a tv show.

  • stepbackink

    stepbackink said 6 years ago

    I watch food show and always end up making my own foods my way.

  • Visuaria

    Visuaria said 6 years ago

    I think cooking shows have helped people cook more at home, but mostly it's a matter of applying to our diets the creativity, planning, and effort that we apply to other areas of our lives. It doesn't have to be that hard--20 recipes and a good master shopping list can do the trick. But unfortunately diet and meal planning gets neglected in our busy lives.

  • peculiartreats

    peculiartreats said 6 years ago

    Deen's response to Bourdain wasn't an insult to him, but a backhand to poor/middle America. He was talking about healthy eating; she turned it into a money issue, reinforcing that idea that you can't eat healthy on a budget so you shouldn't even try. In Paula's world, us average bill-paying, child-feeding Americans can't be bothered worrying about eating well, or diabetes, or obesity, so pull out the overprocessed, oversalted and oversugared box foods and let's pretend we're better than those 'food snobs' who actually cook from scratch, y'all! As a poor gal trying to eat healthy, I want to smack the butter right out of her. (And then I remember that it's probably an engineered feud for ratings, and I want to set the TV on fire...)

  • piggledee

    piggledee said 6 years ago

    Great article - well written and thoughtful. I was a "foodie" once, obsessed with celebrity chef cookbooks and I even went to Cordon Bleu to be a certified chef. However, when it comes to feeding healthy food to children, I am learning cooking doesn't have to be complicated. Organic, fresh fruit and veggies taste so good, you don't need to do much to them. I also bake bread - which again tastes so much better (and cheaper) than supermarket bread, my kids eat it without butter or cream cheese. Simple is best!

  • jtart

    jtart said 6 years ago

    mark bittman, i think is an excellent food role model.

  • MyWisteriaCottage

    MyWisteriaCottage said 6 years ago

    Home food is best keep it simple clean and fresh. People make too much out of cooking and scare themselves into needing to eat fast food cause it "Takes less time" are you kidding. Walk to your garden and pick whats ripe and wash and steam it,add some simple seasoning and there is dinner. So easy. I love the cooking showes,I have learned so much,and rejected some of the ideas as well. You don't have to watch it all or beleive all that you do watch.

  • DistinctiveColorArt

    DistinctiveColorArt said 6 years ago

    Cooking is difficult for me so I enjoy any shows that make it easy yet wholesome and nutritious. If I ever had enough money, I'd hire my own cook to at least come in a few days each week.

  • mimialexander

    mimialexander said 6 years ago

    Thank you so much for this article! As I write this, I am in the middle of making Saturday morning breakfast: made from scratch buttermilk pancakes! My two kids are tearing them up! I am definitely a foodie willing to try nearly anything. Unfortunately, because of budget constraints and the fact that I am alone in my family of four who will try anything, I have learned to come back down to earth. I thoroughly enjoy cooking and that's a huge plus because we rarely eat out. I have learned how to create delicious, nutritious and SIMPLE meals on a tight budget. Fresh is best and I have found that it is more expensive to buy junk food and frozen meals than to make it from scratch. And it's not necessarily faster to make the processed food meals either. I use what I have on hand, and make the most of everything.

  • HardlySimpleDesigns

    HardlySimpleDesigns said 6 years ago

    First things first, I love Anthony Bourdain! Although, recently he has spent a little too much time commenting on other "food/chef celebrities". His book "Kitchen Confidential" took me back to my restaurant days and the adrenaline that food service provides. Unfortunately, the United States is becoming more and more a country of convenience. We want great food now, but we don't have the "time" to prepare it after a long day at work. It is much easier to pay someone else (aka a restaurant) to do it for us. However, I think the food climate is slowly changing. Families and individuals are going green, creating home gardens, and cooking from scratch. Great food does not have to be complicated. Pasta, tomatoes, garlic, and basil. BAM! There's dinner! :)

  • greenboat

    greenboat said 6 years ago

    Since marrying my cooking-obsessed husband six years ago I've found myself watching a lot of Food Network, and now Cooking Network, TV shows, along with Travel Channel's contributions such as Anthony Bourdain. I used to love Guy Fieri, but his shtick's getting old (enough with the spiked blonde hair and surfer shorts, already!) and the show has turned into "Diners, Drive-Ins and Wretched Excess," featuring overflowing plates of excessively fatty food - not unlike Paula Deen with her infernal cackling and mounds of butter. You're right - Bourdain's a refreshingly acerbic, taste-courageous, and honest food critic and adventurer, but says little about how to translate the discoveries he makes into our own kitchens. The truth is, most of these shows make cooking SEEM impossible. They professionalize a basic skill, and intimidate people by setting the bar too high - much like the unfortunate professionalization of music and dance. The fact is you do NOT have to apply professional standards to your private enjoyments. Cooking - despite what the Food Network would have you believe - is not about competition and perfection. It need not take over your life. You can simply enjoy what you do, with whatever time you have to put into it. (And if you want more time for it, try watching less television!) It's much like arts and crafts that way. You do not have to be a professional to enjoy what you do.

  • panthia

    panthia said 6 years ago

    Great article :) I love Anthony Bourdain, the concept of his show, the exposure to different cultures. I am impressed when he tempers his sarcasm and shows the utmost patience and charm to people who respect food. I also like his honesty when dealing with fraudsters. That said, who doesn't love to indulge once in a while the Paula Deen way? I am an existentialist and I believe people choose their destinies. Paula Deen isn't a menace, people are a menace to themselves. Moderation is key.

  • laurengibson

    laurengibson said 6 years ago

    Really interesting article/blog. I think that Paula Deen represents that Americans just don't seem to care what they are eating is really detrimental to their health. The food network really doesn't seem to have that many healthier cooking shows or even, as Danielle mentioned, have viable options for people on a budget. Its hard for the average American to choose their foods wisely--in a world where a McDonald's meal is cheaper than buying the ingredients for a salad, it's no wonder that Americans have so many health problems related to food (obesity, diabetes, etc).

  • rn101

    rn101 said 6 years ago

    I never trust polls-there are so many variants/determinants regarding polls, that they really are little more than a guesstamite. What I love about things like this is seeing how many people have to state how great they are and deride those don't-they all have easy, quick fixes so that we can be cool like they are, just like Bourdain. People need to remember that Bourdain styles himself a tough, came-up-the-hard-way kind of guy; he went to Vassar before attending the CIA, and his own brother calls him a perennial "malcontent;" most of Bourdain's myth is self made. And for those of you who applaud his comments to Paula Dean, please remember that when he has been places like Provence, where every person he hung out was overweight or morbidly obese, he has never once said one negative thing; he doesn't teach anyone anything; he is entertainment. As soon as he became famous, he ditched his wife, and married a Rachel Ray look-alike with big boobs and a sexy accent. He is kind of a sad person, if you think about it.

  • NatalieDrest

    NatalieDrest said 6 years ago

    Well maybe if some of these TV watching non-cookers watched less TV they would have more time to cook?

  • hawthornehill

    hawthornehill said 6 years ago

    Awesome article!!!! Great to learn!!!

  • LazyTcrochet

    LazyTcrochet said 6 years ago

    I saw that article. I especially loved... "When Deen fries a chicken, many of us balk. When the Manhattan chefs David Chang or Andrew Carmellini do, we grovel for reservations and swoon over the homey exhilaration of it all. Her strips of bacon, skirting pancakes, represent heedless gluttony. Chang’s dominoes of pork belly, swaddled in an Asian bun, signify high art."

  • sewing63

    sewing63 said 6 years ago

    I watch alot of cooking shows. I don't cook much because it's just me, but when I do I get alot of ideas by watching the cooking channels. Everyone loves my cooking wdhen I do cook.

  • TheMillineryShop

    TheMillineryShop said 6 years ago

    My mother was a home economics teacher in New York City. She taught both Foods and Sewing, skills that kids seriously need. When those classes were phased out many, many years ago, they were thought of as archaic and unnecessary. No one considered that these are just the skills needed to help people make good decisions about food, diet and health. All these cooking shows are filling that need for us to be aware of what we take in our bodies and the ability to enjoy the ride while you're at it.

  • Exaltation

    Exaltation said 6 years ago

    My gastronomic role models: David Wolfe & Daniel Vitalis They are health and longevity geniuses, I highly recommend youtubing their names!! :)

  • YellowBugBoutique

    YellowBugBoutique said 6 years ago

    Very interesting article but I have to admit it saddens me that so few people cook any more. I grew up with a mother who cooked literally everything from scratch and taught her 4 daughters those skills. When I was pregnant with my first child I vowed that weither a boy or girl

  • YellowBugBoutique

    YellowBugBoutique said 6 years ago

    NOTE TO SELF- finish coffee before typing! Very interesting article but I have to admit it saddens me that so few people cook any more. I grew up with a mother who cooked literally everything from scratch and taught her 4 daughters those skills. When I was pregnant with my first child I vowed that whether a boy or girl, my child would be able to cook, sew on a button and do laundry. I am proud to say, my son who is now 20 is a fabulous cook and is sought after to be a roommate to others for those skills. He told me the other day how much better he feels when he eats home cooked vs fast food....plus how much money he saves on a poor college students budget! If so few are cooking now...how low will that number fall with the next generation...very sad!

  • MissTessaMelissa

    MissTessaMelissa said 6 years ago

    I love watching Good Eats, and I even record it. I would love a food show based on cooking for children and with children. Almost every TV chef throws in a meal or two that is geared towards kids, but no shows are focused on it. I have a 5 year old and a husband who eats like a 5 year old, and I am scrounging everyday to find meals for them. I love to cook, but it gets boring making the same five meals all the time because they are family approved. Ventures away from those staples often end in tears.

  • SeannPatrick

    SeannPatrick said 6 years ago

    I love watching Good Eats too! I have used many of his recipes in my own kitchen and they have all turned out great. Granted some did take a few tries to get new techniques down but it is always worth it in my opinion. I would be interested to see a show that cooks with children. Learning how and participating in the kitchen is so important for kids. I have done a bit with my nephews and hopefully will do a lot with my future kids. One of the main reasons that I like Good Eats so much is that it explains the science of what is happening and I think that if kids can understand chemistry and watch it happen in the kitchen then they will be more likely to a) try it and b)be excited about science in school!

  • RaithesCurios

    RaithesCurios said 6 years ago

    I grew up with cooking, I lived in Germany, surrounded with home cooking, and I even went and got a cooking degree to be a professional in the business. I have to confess to being baffled with the American perception of food on the whole. They want to instantly be what they see on television, but anyone I have attempted to teach gets an attitude and say they don't want to learn to do something foreign. How is learning to cook roux foreign? Or even knowing the herbs and vegetables to make your own stock? My last room-mate would screech when I would handle a chicken with my bare hands, calling cooking dirty. Really? Wow, um, I was raised you know how healthy your soul is with how much you work and make your own food. Come on, people, you really do have to break a few eggs and get your hands into your food!

  • JenNortonArtStudio

    JenNortonArtStudio said 6 years ago

    Food celebrities are celebrities because they've been able to define their brand. Most of us don't eat in only one style, so I don't think they're indicative of how we actually eat. They're more an illustration of how we THINK we should eat, in the perfect world. If only we could cook like so-and-so, have the right book, the right kitchen, the extra time or money. I think that's the curse of being American...having so many choices, so we never really choose. It's the everyday, mundane cooking shared with family that is the real gift. If we have enough of that, we are not tempted by all the other branding being sold to us. It becomes secondary entertainment to what's real, providing nutrition and love around the family table. I paint family recipes precisely to honor this tradition and elevate it to a Fine Art.

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