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calebgardner

A few weeks ago I wrote a post about the importance of technology breaks to teach kids how to be still. Quiet self-reflection is going to be a skill not many children have in our technology-obsessed culture. But the integration of technology into children’s everyday lives isn’t all negative. In fact, it’s having some interesting side effects.

A study released last month from Latitude Research says that children view technology inherently differently than their adult counterparts. They see it as something fundamentally human, easily assimilated into everyday life – as opposed to adults, who view it as separate from humanness. Kids are viewing technology as “moving from acts of knowledge transmission toward acts of exploration, collaboration, and creation.”

The study specifically focused on the children’s reactions to having robots as part of everyday life, and showed how willing they are to integrate them into their social circles. The robots used in the study became natural members of their peer groups, and actually helped them to fit in. The children also felt more confident when working on class assignments with the help of robots.

The ease with which children are embracing technology is not a surprise to me, given how effortlessly my son has embraced things like our iPad for learning as well as entertainment. Already he is being imbued with a sense of knowledge at his fingertips, of learning as a natural part of everyday life. I get a sense of nostalgic envy when I realize he’ll never know the joys and pains of cassette tapes or the Dewey Decimal System, but if technology is embedding learning as part of his essential human experience, I’m all for it.

Ultimately, the study concludes that new technologies are creating the possibility of closing the gap between learning and play. Kids are quick to see the two as overlapping activities, even as we pry them apart through compartmentalizing their lives to ridiculous degrees. I want to see Miles continue to associate the two together, and make learning (and playing) a part of his life for the long haul.

How do your children use technology? Do you think they see it as a fundamental part of being human? Are you okay with that?

More Posts From Caleb

Caleb Gardner is an amateur father and husband who writes at The Exceptional Man and dabbles in photography, design, and music. When listening to the cacophony of modern-day America, Caleb prefers a side of Scotch. He calls Chicago home, and in winter, less-nice things.

4 Featured Comments

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  • NewSongMusicLLC

    Joleen steel from Newsongmusic says: Featured

    I love the statement about kids thinking of technology as opportunities for collaboration, exploration and creation. As an educator and mom of three boys. I sometimes worry they use technology to escape. It's been a real challenge to help them balance imaginative play time with what I call "screen time" But, I do see some "screens" can actually increase their imagination. My 13 year old is into creating utube videos of him and his friends doing magic tricks while my 6 year old loves the photo booth app on my mac where he can film himself making crazy faces and acting zany. I think as parents our greatest challenge is to find ways not be threatened by technology while at the same time providing pencil paper, crayons, paints, musical instruments, puppets etc.. for the non "screen times"

    4 years ago

  • PopLoveCouture

    Shai Wallach from PopLoveCouture says: Featured

    Closing the gap between learning and play? Yes! Perhaps the next generation will be the ones to make that well-needed shift from the cubicle back to the home, great outdoors, and a more natural integration of technologies into our everyday life. We can dream, can't we?

    4 years ago

  • slathered

    Sharon Moores from slathered says: Featured

    Very interesting. I've noticed how my 6-year-old interacts with the iPad is very different from how my husband and I do. We're still treat our iPads as these fascinating machines and LOOK, I CAN WORK ON ETSY FROM THE COUCH WITHOUT GOING STERILE! OOOOH! But the iPad is an everyday object to our daughter. She picks it up, reads a book on it, then puts it down to go play with Legos. It's not a modern technology marvel to her -- it just *is*. Frankly, she has a much healthier relationship with it than my husband and I do.

    4 years ago

  • xiongv

    Vang from OrigamiVintage says: Featured

    My daughter is only in preschool and part of her curriculum includes a computer class every couple of weeks. I think it is smart for schools to keep up with technology and understand that computer literacy is important for the next generation in how they will impact society economically and socially. However, this does bring up the important issue of the divide between those who have access to computers and those who do not have access to computers. Here is an interesting article about that: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/04/opinion/sunday/internet-access-and-the-new-divide.html?pagewanted=all

    4 years ago

  • MegansMenagerie

    Megan from MegansMenagerie says:

    Great post! My daughter loves to play on the computer but I make sure it's fun and educational and there is always a time limit set. She really enjoys it and I think it's a great way for her continue learning things. Its funny to me that she assumes it's always existed and in her life it has so you can't blame her for thinking that way. She looks at me like I'm crazy when I tell her there wasn't always Internet and tv...lol.

    4 years ago

  • DeborahJoyDesigns

    Deborah from DeborahJoyDesigns says:

    Children are so amazing. Their minds are so active and many studies have proved just how fast they learn. I have many young siblings and am constantly amazed by what they know and how they adapt to new circumstances. I think how much technology time depends on the child some benefit from lots other from little or none, I have definitively seen this in my young siblings.

    4 years ago

  • paperrevolver

    paperrevolver from PaperRevolver says:

    My Daughter also plays some great educational games on the computer but we do have to set a time limit. Great Post!! Thanks

    4 years ago

  • NewSongMusicLLC

    Joleen steel from Newsongmusic says: Featured

    I love the statement about kids thinking of technology as opportunities for collaboration, exploration and creation. As an educator and mom of three boys. I sometimes worry they use technology to escape. It's been a real challenge to help them balance imaginative play time with what I call "screen time" But, I do see some "screens" can actually increase their imagination. My 13 year old is into creating utube videos of him and his friends doing magic tricks while my 6 year old loves the photo booth app on my mac where he can film himself making crazy faces and acting zany. I think as parents our greatest challenge is to find ways not be threatened by technology while at the same time providing pencil paper, crayons, paints, musical instruments, puppets etc.. for the non "screen times"

    4 years ago

  • TheMillineryShop

    Marcia Lacher from TheMillineryShop says:

    Just think of this: One day, our kids, or grandkids are going to say "Remember Facebook?" Now THAT is mind-boggling!

    4 years ago

  • VoleedeMoineaux

    Hillary De Moineaux from VoleedeMoineaux says:

    Remember Myspace? Or Aol chat?

    4 years ago

  • eversolovely

    Ever So Lovely from EverSoLovely says:

    Great post and I agree with Marcia. Totally mind-boggling :)

    4 years ago

  • thevicagirl

    VaLon Frandsen from thevicagirl says:

    I don't have children of my own, but when I worked as a turtor a few years ago I was amazed at how much the little five year olds where use to their cell phones and ipods. They were so confused to learn that I didn't have either. I know that the world has come so far from that now, and it is built into everyones life so much more now. It is just crazy to see where the world will go from here.

    4 years ago

  • volkerwandering

    Jess from volkerwandering says:

    Whether we like it or not, technology is part of the human culture. Not a day goes by without interacting with some form of it. It's great most of the time! I don't think that children should have facebook accounts, though. It's dangerous enough for the adults, what with identity theft, burglary, etc.

    4 years ago

  • purplmama

    Peggy from purplmama says:

    Joleen, that's so true! My 6 yr old son often walks me through problems on my iPhone! He has an iPad and a computer, and can log into our cable system and change the tv channels!! He takes mere seconds to research and find anything on the web that he's interested in. That's SCARY-SCARY but fantastic at the same time. However, while he's technologically and keyboard proficient, his penmanship is lacking, so we work on that. I'm a student teacher, and I find this concept exciting. Thanks, Caleb, for a wonderful article, and reminding us that technology can be a great thing for our kids!

    4 years ago

  • TresChicNmodern

    TresChicNmodern from TresChicNmodern says:

    YOUR ITEMS ARE ADORABLE!!!!!!!!!!!!! SOoOoOOo CUTE TOO!!! WAY TO GO!!!

    4 years ago

  • funnydays

    funnydays from funnydays says:

    love it!

    4 years ago

  • quiltedbykaren

    Karen Brauer from quiltedbykaren says:

    Great article. So true.

    4 years ago

  • vynsimplicity

    Melissa Mulder from VyntageBlooms says:

    OOOhh, in the case of ipads and such it is important to instil a certain amount of resect for the "toy". It is not like a building block or doll and should be treated with gentleness, asked for by parental approval and monitored carefully as our children grow... Why you ask? Well my nephew age 5 just dropped his mummy's and broke the screen! My son of age 10 just let me know of a few child target games with little people in tiny underwear with really big boobs! Monitor, monitor, monitor!

    4 years ago

  • RivalryTime

    Phil Jackson from NuptialNotion says:

    Great post.

    4 years ago

  • jodieflowers
  • ALittleWorld

    Catia from ALittleWorld says:

    Great article. My son - 5 years old - sees computer and tablets as any other toy, but he still spend most of his play time with legos, cardboard boxes toys and such; so for now I am okay with that. I love "making things" and I always try to include him in the process, he is learning that it can be fun!

    4 years ago

  • TheBeautyofBoredom

    Gracie from TheBeautyofBoredom says:

    If I were to ever have kids, I would definitely support them when it came to using technology, whether it be the computer, an iphone, the internet, or an mp3 player. But I would make sure that they get a few hours away from technology every day. I read an interesting article (which can be found here) http://www.themotherhuddle.com/the-beauty-of-boredom/ about how it can actually a good thing to let kids be bored. I think it relates to the article written here because not only is it good for children to accept and embrace technology, and associate learning with fun, but it is also important for them to have time to be bored. Being bored means they have to think of something to do themselves, without relying on mom or the computer to entertain them. It challenges their creativity to have to find something interesting to do. Both are going to be very important for the children of the future- using technology to learn, adapt, and fit in to society, and also having alone time to develop their creativity and think of great ideas.

    4 years ago

  • PopLoveCouture

    Shai Wallach from PopLoveCouture says: Featured

    Closing the gap between learning and play? Yes! Perhaps the next generation will be the ones to make that well-needed shift from the cubicle back to the home, great outdoors, and a more natural integration of technologies into our everyday life. We can dream, can't we?

    4 years ago

  • RockYourRoom

    Kathleen Flatoff from RockYourRoom says:

    My daughter struggled to get her monthly reading goals done. This Christmas she got a Nook and has surpassed her goal by 1000 minutes each month!

    4 years ago

  • PoleStar

    Jennifer Juniper from PoleStar says:

    My kids view technology as something to do with every day life as well. The actually ask us to pause programs on tv if they don't want to miss something while they use the restroom, as they've grown up with DVRs. I get excited thinking about the amazing tools my 5 and 7 year old will have when they are adults. Technology will be so incorporated to our wearables and accessories that to them today's iPhones may look as old-fashioned and bulky as electric typewriters look to today's grown ups.

    4 years ago

  • popkingarb

    Ea Senga from lamerdereve says:

    i agree that children have a different outlook on technology today than what we have when we were kids. my son already knows how to work a laptop, digital camera and ipod touch, and my nephew can also play with an ipod touch even if he doesn't know how to read yet, whilst my parents can't even turn a PC on! it seems that children are getting more and more smarter than we might think...

    4 years ago

  • WingedWorld

    Vickie Moore from WingedWorld says:

    Why shouldn't learning be fun? My kids have a great time learning Spanish by watching HBO's “El Perro y El Gato” cartoons on YouTube, or playing with Spanish apps on our family iPad. There are tons of fun math games available online for them, not to mention guitar lessons for me.

    4 years ago

  • Harleyfae

    Mickey D from Harleyfae says:

    I love the ease with which my children use technology. I was in a computers class back in high school in the 80s when there was only Wang and IBM. Now my knowledge of technology is Paleolithic in comparison to my kids. Even my 7 year old masters new technologies with ease while I sit back and scratch my head. It is amazing what they learn. The stress of tracking down information using the dewy decimal system is gone. I love that for them!

    4 years ago

  • goodbeads

    goodbeads from goodbeads says:

    So lovely,Great!

    4 years ago

  • optic

    Rhonda from opticdesign says:

    My children for sure see technology as part of being a human. I am fascinated by that, but it also annoys me. I had to spend a grand portion of my growing up time "outside" it seems that I have to "push" my own out the door. On the other had who do I call when I need help with the great technology???? You got it...my kids. So here it goes along with a lot of other worries as a parent... its a love - hate relationship.

    4 years ago

  • Iammie

    iammie from iammie says:

    Interesting post!

    4 years ago

  • KMalinka

    Natalia from KMalinkaVintage says:

    Awesome post!

    4 years ago

  • peshka

    Peshka from Peshka says:

    Cool article!

    4 years ago

  • adrianaallenllc

    Adriana Allen from adrianaallenllc says:

    I am looking forward to having a child to be able to explore the world with him or her and through her or his eyes. I know it will be an amazing experience,

    4 years ago

  • beliz82

    Beliz from beliz82 says:

    I am also looking forward to have a child and i am saving your blog posts for the future.All kids for sure must use new technologies and will grow with new inventions.But what i really want is that children must grow with thinking and creating and using their imagination.The big question for me is ''Are computers,televisions and all technological developments make kids more lazy and will i be able to keep up with them in the future ?This scares me sometimes.Actually i want my kid to travel instead of googling places.Well we will see :).

    4 years ago

  • slathered

    Sharon Moores from slathered says: Featured

    Very interesting. I've noticed how my 6-year-old interacts with the iPad is very different from how my husband and I do. We're still treat our iPads as these fascinating machines and LOOK, I CAN WORK ON ETSY FROM THE COUCH WITHOUT GOING STERILE! OOOOH! But the iPad is an everyday object to our daughter. She picks it up, reads a book on it, then puts it down to go play with Legos. It's not a modern technology marvel to her -- it just *is*. Frankly, she has a much healthier relationship with it than my husband and I do.

    4 years ago

  • sweetsarahcardsandtr

    Sarah M. from sweetsarahpatisserie says:

    intriguing article

    4 years ago

  • OnlyOriginalsByAJ

    AJ Marsden from OnlyOriginalsByAJ says:

    Interesting article! I do not have children, but I have nieces and nephews and I'm also a teacher. I think technology plays an important role in learning. Its amazing to me how quickly kids can pick up how to use an iPad, it took me much longer! At the university where I teach, we are also in the works of purchasing programs that will helps us teach material through an iPad. As a statistics professor, I think this is a great idea! The kids would much, much rather have an interactive class using technology than just listen to me lecture for 50 minutes!

    4 years ago

  • SusiesBoutiqueTLC

    SusiesBoutiqueTLC from SusiesBoutiqueTLC says:

    Great article. Congratulations.

    4 years ago

  • Diannasdiapercakes

    Dianna Stewart from Diannasdiapercakes says:

    Thanks for including my decorative robot plug covers! Great article!

    4 years ago

  • BanglewoodSupplies

    BanglewoodSupplies from BanglewoodSupplies says:

    So true. Nice article.

    4 years ago

  • Parachute425

    Parachute425 from Parachute425 says:

    My children have taught their grandmother to program her Tivo but can't use the rotary phone that's been in her kitchen since 1959. They kept trying to push the numbers through the holes. Ha! New technology is wonderful but when the electricity is out and the batteries are dead, and the cell phones keep dropping your call, that phone still works.

    4 years ago

  • FigeroDesigns

    Fiona from FigeroDesigns says:

    At all stages in human life we need to keep the balance, adults and children alike. A bit of screen time a bit of down time. Technology is a wonderful thing and children have, educational and fun time with it. However I believe as parents we need to be there for and with them embracing the new but monitoring and teaching the pitfalls.

    4 years ago

  • DiscordVintage

    Discord Vintage from DiscordVintage says:

    I tutor primary and high school English on the weekends, so I see endless student essays on this topic. This is a very insightful article, and certainly adds something new to the table.

    4 years ago

  • xiongv

    Vang from OrigamiVintage says: Featured

    My daughter is only in preschool and part of her curriculum includes a computer class every couple of weeks. I think it is smart for schools to keep up with technology and understand that computer literacy is important for the next generation in how they will impact society economically and socially. However, this does bring up the important issue of the divide between those who have access to computers and those who do not have access to computers. Here is an interesting article about that: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/04/opinion/sunday/internet-access-and-the-new-divide.html?pagewanted=all

    4 years ago

  • soveryhappyart

    Diane from soveryhappyart says:

    My 3 year old and my 23 year old both use the IPAD effortlessly. It's been fascinating to watch them explore with it. They actually spend a lot of time pulling up our photo collection and looking at the pictures of family members and friends.

    4 years ago

  • SchemesDeMonterey

    Sherileisa from SchemesDeMonterey says:

    In observing my two children for 25 years now, I see computer technology and internet access as a fundamental part of being human. I think it dramatically closes the learning curve to becoming literate as well. I have a home video of my daughter at age 18 months, sitting in her father's office chair with the phone in one hand, and the other hand tapping away on the computer keyboard. She was making "hello" sounds, and chattering in an agreeable businesslike fashion lol! This was not staged, but she did this all by herself. Six years later, she was teaching Basic Computer Skills to her 2nd grade classmates. And my son, born in 2000, has had very sparse public school attendance. I home-schooled him for most of the 3rd and 4th grades through am online public school. Well. it was discovered that by the 4th grade he was already reading at an early College reading level! Of course, his learning was surely motivated by his need to comprehend and win VIDEO GAMES Hahaha! At any rate, if biology and evolution come into play here, the human brain is primed and ready to accept and excel with the advancing information technology. I did read the article about the Great Divide in availability of computers and reliable internet access based on individual economic status and geography. I'm a single parent on disability, so my budget doesn't allow for high-end contracts with monthly payments etc. Yet, I have always been able to find affordable and dependable high-speed internet access through my phone line. I do live in Central CA. USA, so perhaps I'm lucky to live where affordable access is common. Our current Century and Millennium is young. I think we're entering an era when the issue of computer and internet access will soon become a non-issue for all who pursue making it happen.

    4 years ago

  • Mycrochetingventure

    sandra from Mycrochetingventure says:

    very interesting article. thank you for sharing

    4 years ago

  • metalicious

    Stephanie Maslow Blackman from metalicious says:

    I am pro-technology with my kids. I can't tell you how many times I answered, "Mom, how is _____ made?" with a peek on YouTube. Of course nothing beats going on a trip to a real dairy farm, or chocolate factory or taking apart an old stereo together. But I think the ability to access so much information so quickly and easily can be helpful if used with adult supervision.

    4 years ago

  • Craftelina

    vik and ig from Craftelina says:

    In our family we acknowledge the importance of computers and encourage children to be open to the technologies. At the same time, we see technologie as a natural part of the human craft. After all technologie is a part of the human development, continuation of everything hand-made of the past. We are avid crafters and our children absorb our daily business with the needlefelting, pottery and doll making whcih we love and do all the time. So, we strive to combine the hi-tech and the low tech in harmony, as part of one. :) Love and light- that is what matters!

    4 years ago

  • catherinemarksstumpo

    Catherine Marks-Stumpo says:

    I am a mom of 2 year old boy. . And the school I will be sending him to is a Waldorf School. There are NO computers in the lower grades. Even the CEOs and the creators of computers in silicone valley know that young children should not be exposed to computers,television and video games. The American Pediatrics are quoted with saying "NO television or computers for children under three,it is bad for there vision. Let Children play outside! They are only children once, why are we rushing them. I am for technology, I believe it is a blessing. And it is my hope that parents research the pros and cons of computers, TV,video games etc.. I believe it to be damaging to there developing young minds.

    4 years ago

  • snugglyugly
  • AmazinMaisie

    AmazinMaisie from AmazinMaisie says:

    I teach at the other end of the spectrum than many of the comments here are discussing, and I think I should throw out a cautionary warning. I teach college English. While you are all so happy with how comfortable your children are with their technology, I worry about the attachment my students (bless their little Millenial hearts) have to theirs. Far more of them are "aliterate" (can read but choose not to) than illiterate, but it's hard to tell the difference sometimes. Our beginning freshmen are tested every year, and their reading comprehension levels have dropped every year for the last 20 years. Less than half of them have read a complete book or written a researched paper of any type before hitting college. They spend 90% of their time with a cell phone or Ipad in hand (and are often belligerent when asked to put them aside to during class time), but the depth of what they explore on them is the latest gossip from FB or Twitter. They seem to believe that If they can't get the information they need in a "sound byte" of a paragraph or less, it's not worth knowing or doing. Computers and related technologies can be wonderful tools, but while letting our children use them, we need to make sure they understand the finest tool EVER is the human brain, and its the one they should be using the most.

    4 years ago

  • AmazinMaisie

    AmazinMaisie from AmazinMaisie says:

    Apologies for the mistakes in the post above. Teachers should take their own advice and proofread before posting.

    4 years ago

  • switches1979

    Sarah Dee says:

    After reading and going through all the articles posted above, I must say technology is a double edged sword. Currently I attend the University of Phoenix through AXIA classes (completely online). I am studying Psychology. I held a 4.0 GPA until I reached a class called HUM/176--mind you I am a non-traditional student who had been out of school for well over 15 years as well. This class was all about CRITICAL THINKING and practical application in regard to society, the historical significance of popular culture, how social networking is impacting society both negatively and positively, and the ramifications of media intertwined with school work. The class was pretty heavy and there were many heated debates! The reason my GPA fell to a 3.95 was of my ignorance of the correct procedure and inability to write APA style citations! I have relied on my computer so long to correct my grammar, spelling,and style; I did not realize how much more there is to writing at the college level! I do not disagree technology does many wonderful things for culture, society, and children's learning abilities. There have been studies done where video games have proven to increase dexterity (this is why many military simulations use 'video game like' equipment) and allow for a "fun way to learn." There are however boundaries which responsible parents hopefully will put in place; not only to safeguard children's privacy, but to teach them to interact outwardly on a social level. One of the repetitive concerns expressed from parents in my HUM/176 class was about how their children (mostly the older ones 12+) no longer did anything other than texting, social networking, P2P gaming, and other computer related activities. This is what their generation considers socializing. (I realize this is a gross generalization and does NOT pertain to everyone--before someone gets mad at me!) I am merely expressing what my classmates did. So I believe AmazinMaisie is quite correct. Boundaries need to be set in order for our children to be able to take FULL advantage of EVERYTHING that is readily available to them. I do not want to begin citing here so I will leave it to all of you to do some critical thinking and perhaps some research. Norway, 2009 a group of scientist conducted a study, their focus group: adolescents and excessive computer use; hypothesis and study factors: correlation to anxiety, introversion, depression, and possible hypertension. Okay, you may Google the information or look it up in the library! ;-) As I said before, I am pro-technology! For without it I would not be able to be in my classes!! I am also pro-active/responsibility!! The World Wide Web is a great power... and "with great power comes great responsibility."-Voltaire (or Stan Lee via Spiderman if you prefer)

    4 years ago

  • sunshineair

    中田 英寿 says:

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    4 years ago

  • LaurenRoseJewlers

    Lauren Rose from LaurenRoseJewlers says:

    As an education major, I think technology has great bennifits. However I hope the children who are our future of tomorrow dont become to dependent on it because it is separate from humans and although a great tool we should be teaching our children that finding out answers we might find with technology is also achievable by going out in the world and finding the answers them for ourselves and is a undeniably great opportunity that is available. Also as an educator I am concerned about those who dont have access to technology due to income and other issues. Hopefully we can find a healthy balance of real world experiences and use of technology!

    4 years ago

  • shaydawindle

    shaydakw from VintageDandelions says:

    Interesting perspective on how technology is impacting children and their views of the world. It's nice to see that people see both sides of the story - the good and the bad. To Peggy's comment above about her son's penmanship, I recently learned (and was in shock) to find out that many schools across the US aren't even teaching cursive anymore. Schools are utilizing free web based education programs setup by organizations such as The Khan academy, and use systems like the online "blackboard" for assignments rather than doing it on paper. While there are pros and cons to these approaches in teaching, the truth is that this world is moving further and further towards being completely technological and I think that the long term impacts will be greater than one can truly fathom at this point. I don't think we should lose sight of the fact that PEN and PAPER have been used to teach, communicate, and educate human beings since the beginning of time. Some schools may be against these approaches but please, take the time to teach your children the basics before sending them out into the world!

    4 years ago

  • theblackfeather

    theblackfeather from theblackfeather says:

    This is a great post and great discussion. I find it refreshing that children are using technology to explore and collaborate. My only worry is how we use and learn technology compared to how other countries are using and learning technology. While, here in America we are taught how to use software, and how to use the technology, however, other countries are learning how to create software and how to create technology. And I think it's important that we also learn how to create software, using programming, and not just learning how to click and use, but to learn how the technology we use is being created and how it works. I was introduced to this video and I thought this was very interesting: http://vimeo.com/18681508

    4 years ago

  • PennyPickers

    PennyPickers from PennyPickers says:

    I love this discussion. I am a Media Specialist at a Middle School in Virginia. My title, which used to be librarian, has been changed just like the library. The library is not the center for learning and unfortunately we are not in the book business. It has become the testing center and I have become a computer technician. My book circulation has suffered and decreased over the past five years. I can safely say students that attend our middle school 6th, 7th and 8th grades have never read a book cover to cover. Our student’s write just like they text, informally and with acronyms. I am concerned about this generation of students. But... they have become exactly what we have molded them into. So Sad!

    4 years ago

  • annyschoo

    anny schoo from linenclothingbyanny says:

    I agree with Catherine Marks-Stumpo. Kids should be kids and play as natural as they SHOULD be. I believe technology can be learned for all ages when it's in need. there is no rush to engage early. I REALLY THINK ADULTS should screen out violence out of pc games. When a 7 year old boy says he is going to kill random, It is disturbing to me even it's a game. I also heard a true "joke" that a little child uses i pad often and when she picked up a book, she didn't know how to flip the page of a real book that she draws her finger across the surface of the book, hoping it WORKS like i pad does. I agree kids pick up fast when it comes to technology. parents don't have to feel "proud" in particular, a chimp can be trained to do so as well. Creativity and imagination happen in a real "PLAY". Machines only train your brain how to coordinate with it.

    4 years ago

  • tiemee

    Kate from tiemee says:

    I marvel at how my 3 year old daughter executes her fingers in rapid succession across my smart phone. She seemlessly uses her index finger to isolate movements and swipes to another page. As I admire her ability to manipulate and coordinate her fingers and utilize her visual perceptual skills I admire further her ability to run, jump, dance, draw, sing and play with tangible items found on the beach and at the playground. I believe balance will be necessary in her growing up with technology.

    4 years ago

  • marieowltoinette

    Marie Owltoinette from marieowltoinette says:

    My brothers are both under the age of 10 and they are both OBSESSED with the computer, video games, and TV. Ten years ago that was me, but instead of the computer, video games, and TV I was entertaining myself with toys and my IMAGINATION. It makes me sad to see them--and other kids, as well--spend so much time in front of a screen!

    4 years ago

  • littlegoatsoaps

    Karly from LittleGoatSoaps says:

    Our son is almost 3 and I have successfully managed to keep most of the toys that require batteries OUT of the house! He does watch some PBS TV. And he has a toddler piano that lights up and plays music, but that's about it. We have puzzles, books, trains, trucks, crayons, glue and scissors!!! Creative play is where its at! So, at 2.75 yrs old, he has the language skills of a 5 yr old. Knows all of his colors, including light & dark shades. Can count 6 objects consistantly, sometimes more. Can identify 3/4 of the alphabet. Can use scissors some (his hands are still a bit small). And can tell you where he lives. Yes, I'm a stay-at-home-mom. And yes, I "etsy" from my smart phone. It's not like we don't use technology, its that the mind of a toddler needs NOT to have it.

    4 years ago

  • paperandpolkadots

    paperandpolkadots from paperandpolkadots says:

    Enjoyed the article! My 5-year old daughter picks up technology so quickly. The iPad, iPhone, my MacBook, her own LeapPad . . . anything that she comes into contact with. While I do limit her activity with these items, it's still such an ease for her mind to wrap around the use of these instruments. Thanks for sharing & if you are looking for more robot items, check out our's here on Etsy - http://www.etsy.com/shop/paperandpolkadots

    4 years ago

  • craftsholic

    craftsholic from craftsholic says:

    Great post

    4 years ago