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That NPR Post Everyone’s Talking About

Jun 26, 2012

by Chappell Ellison

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If you checked into almost any social media outlet last week, you might’ve caught the hubbub: Emily White, a new intern for NPR’s All Songs Considered, published a blog post confessing that she’d only bought 15 CDs in her lifetime, yet has more than 11,000 songs in her personal iTunes library. The article reveals a young music lover, struggling to understand the broken system of music distribution. “As I’ve grown up, I’ve come to realize the gravity of what file-sharing means to the musicians I love. I can’t support them with concert tickets and T-shirts alone. But I honestly don’t think my peers and I will ever pay for albums,” she wrote. Neither White or NPR probably had any inkling of the backlash her article would provoke, aggravating old wounds that were deeper than anyone thought.

In the most thorough response to Emily White’s blog post, David Lowery, a 51-year-old college professor who founded the bands Camper Van Beethoven and Cracker, schools White on the unfair economics of the music business. Lowery’s response is worth reading; with a lifetime of experience in the business, he makes many excellent points. One comment, directed at White’s millennial brethren, stands out:

“Many in your generation are willing to pay a little extra to buy ‘fair trade’ coffee that insures the workers that harvested the coffee were paid fairly. Many in your generation will pay a little more to buy clothing and shoes from manufacturers that certify they don’t use sweatshops… Your generation is largely responsible for the recent cultural changes that has given more equality to same sex couples. On nearly every count, your generation is much more ethical and fair than my generation. Except for one thing. Artist rights.”

While others have been quick to point out that the millennials aren’t the only generation to engage in music theft, Lowery drives the point home in a way that had never crossed my mind: many are willing to pay $5 for a latte they’ll consume once, but not $9.99 for an album that lasts a lifetime.

In a way, I feel bad for Emily. She unknowingly put herself at the center of a greater debate surrounding artistic rights and technological evolution. Her short, honest blog post got everyone slinging arrows and pointing fingers, when what we really should be asking is, how do we recreate the music industry as a system that rewards artists in a world of file sharing?

The bottom line is that if you are an artist whose work can be digitally reproduced, times are tough. Music streaming services like Spotify and Pandora are attempting to grow subscriber bases that will result in bigger and better royalty payments to record companies and their artists. Crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter provide musicians the chance to produce and distribute their work without a large record label acting as the middleman. Still, no one has found the magic formula.

The most immediate, positive outcome of this conversation is that it begs us to reflect on our own consumer habits. I, too, grew up on the digital divide, witnessing the waning days of cassette tapes, the era of CDs, and the rise of file sharing programs like Napster and LimeWire, but I left music piracy behind when I began meeting and making friends with hardworking musicians. Perhaps the key lies in that personal connection. If you feel like you know the musician behind the sounds pouring from your headphones, it changes your idea of what music is worth.

Music Category

4 Featured Comments

  • thehappycouple

    Brianna from thehappycouple said 4 years ago Featured

    I think this translates so well to what we do on Etsy. Before I started making and selling on Etsy I didn't have a true appreciation for what things cost. I think it's so important to remember that there's always a someone behind a something. Everything for sale on Etsy, online, in the national chains, at the grocery store is really just a network of people putting out their ideas and working hard. I think sometimes when people are rich or famous we begrudge them their success and feel it's okay to take advantage, but I don't think we should.

  • GoldenSpiralDesigns

    Lola Ocian from GoldenSpiralDesigns said 4 years ago Featured

    This topic comes up fairly often in my household, because we're all avid listeners and creators of music. What a great article! Some really good points regarding the value of artist's rights and the comparison of those other things we strive for nowadays - such as fair trade, etc... I love Pandora and Grooveshark, which allow me to listen to music on-demand. I love buying albums though, because they are a work of art in themselves. CD's and LP's are more than just recorded songs - they're a full package of intentional art that can be as much fun to peruse and consume, as the music can be to listen to. And, thankfully, many albums these days come with a coupon for free digital download of the album with purchase. That way you can listen to it at home, as well as on the go.

  • paramountvintage

    kristin from blackmoonsky said 4 years ago Featured

    this is such a great article with two strongly opposed sides. i am a musician who has released albums on independent labels. free online file sharing helped draw attention to the album and brought an audience to our shows. it was actually a huge help. and most of the listeners still purchase music.... on vinyl. people will pay for music, but it has to be tangible, artistic, and quality. this should be the new focus for major labels. music, like any art, can be shared once it goes viral.

  • Tacyda

    Tacyda said 4 years ago Featured

    Being a slightly *cough* older generation - I've always bought my music. Even if someone sends me files - if I love it, I feel an obligation to buy it. However, as music distribution evolves, I do love the fact that I can now buy directly from the artist and will do so whenever possible.

112 comments

  • LauraBoyea

    Laura Boyea from LauraBoyea said 4 years ago

    Great article. My husband is a musician, and I wholeheartedly understand the importance to have that same mindset like you mentioned of having your morals the same all across the board when it comes to fairness, equality and love.

  • kh1467

    Kelly from KikuPaper said 4 years ago

    Admitting you would never pay for albums!!?!?!? - Naivete, stupidity or just a temporary absence of good judgement, I don't know.... - Wonder if she would take it back if she could?

  • muffintopdesigns

    cy and d from TheLovelySmith said 4 years ago

    artists have always struggled over creative licenses, artists' rights and the want to be known - and this is just a sign of the times. as much as this saddens me, i am aware that my daughters will probably never know the joy of holding a vinyl record, with all of it's glorious album art, and knowing that they have (financially) supported someone's musical craft. i hope that a fair and equitable solution is found - for everyone's sake!

  • minouette

    Ele from minouette said 4 years ago

    It's a discussion worth having (but am surprised NPR offers no editorial guidance to interns). I remember a high school music teacher forbidding us from photocopying sheet music, because it deprived musicians of royalties, before digital sharing or recorded music was an issue. I've counted too many musicians amongst my friends, and even appear on some recordings in a minor capacity - I only buy entire albums, and don't steal music. I think a lot of the industry backlash is heavy-handed, but I want new music to be produced and musicians to be able to make a living.

  • fernfiddlehead

    Fern from fernfiddlehead said 4 years ago

    Right on! I have two teens and am constantly preaching this message to them.

  • jasonmseger Admin

    Jason Seger from jasonmseger said 4 years ago

    Long live tape and vinyl!

  • kellydietrich

    Kelly Dietrich from kellydietrich said 4 years ago

    Great article. It is an excellent point that Lowery makes when he states that folks are willing to pay $5 for a coffee but not $10 for an album that will last a lifetime.

  • StringBeardCraftery

    Stephanie from StringBeardCraftery said 4 years ago

    It is such a good point to make that people of this generation will pay for quality and assurance in specific items. I love the contrast of a $5 latte to a lifetime of music for 10. What I've noticed as well in my own social circles, is that the people that are downloading are the ones that listen to more obscure or less mainstream artists. It's sad to think that the over produced, over advertised albums are the only ones making money off their "art", while the the fans of true aural art are too busy downloading to actually support their idols. I may be guilty of having a few less than legitimate albums on my computer, but once I decide I like an artist, I make a point to purchase their albums. Sometimes even twice over!

  • StarShineVintage

    Krista Morrison from StarShineVintage said 4 years ago

    Give the intern a break! She probably is thriving in controversy. Many people won't pay for an album today, it is not like she is the only person that won't. Today you can choose to buy one song and not a whole album. Just because she likes one song from a one hit wonder doesn't mean she has to buy the whole album. You can legally own songs without owning an entire album. I must say I am a little old fashion, I scour the shelves of thrift stores where I can get timeless music at a very discounted price, but that may be fair to the artist too? . Previously working in an industry that payed and kept track of talent fees, I know that musicians and actors do not always get their fair cut. However, life is not always fair, and when it is not, we don't sulk in unfairness. Positive people go out and make it work. I guess to be a starving musician is much harder on a person than to be a starving coffee grower in a third world country, a starving artist, or a starving automotive industry worker? What happened to the day when a musician played on the corner and got their dues that way. Unfairness is all in the mind of the beholder. When I have a headache, I buy a coffee and not a New Album.

  • StudioZen

    Leah from StudioZen said 4 years ago

    Being old enough to remember vinyl records (and gasp! 8 track tapes) I miss the days of buying a record at the record store and rushing home to read the liner notes, look at the cool cover art and learn the lyrics from the lyric sheet. Many of my teen years were spent with gigantic headphones on and my bed littered with LP sleeves... It was a different time for music.

  • volkerwandering

    Jess from volkerwandering said 4 years ago

    Awesome article! I agree there should be changes made, but I'm not sure how!

  • thehappycouple

    Brianna from thehappycouple said 4 years ago Featured

    I think this translates so well to what we do on Etsy. Before I started making and selling on Etsy I didn't have a true appreciation for what things cost. I think it's so important to remember that there's always a someone behind a something. Everything for sale on Etsy, online, in the national chains, at the grocery store is really just a network of people putting out their ideas and working hard. I think sometimes when people are rich or famous we begrudge them their success and feel it's okay to take advantage, but I don't think we should.

  • bettylabamba

    Betty LaBamba from TheDecoratedShed said 4 years ago

    Record companies should stop churning out crap and screwing over their musicians.

  • myneedlehabit

    Carla Hansen from myneedlehabit said 4 years ago

    Why does Mick Jagger have more money than God? Because I've been buying Rolling Stones' records since I was a child.

  • funkomavintage

    Tressie from funkomavintage said 4 years ago

    Yes, Emily probably had no idea what she was getting herself into...but that's what youth is for...Learning. It's not news that artists are hardly ever respected until they make money, and lots of it...or are dead! (my most recent music LP purchase was Father John Misty). .....as....far as David Lowery's comment that the young'ens of today are more ethical, I'd like to remind folks who it was that marched, who bitched, who demonstrated, who chanted Freedom ! (hint, the grandparents and parents of the young'ens) (yeah Occupy!) The young ones aren't more ethical....but, as a group, perhaps they don't know yet exactly what are the real important things...Considering the last 30 years of the slipperyness of politics and the current silly mass media pop culture, I know it is hard to understand Real from Fakey Fakeness, and Kind from Shallow Shallowness. Emily just learned something real important though....

  • TheMillineryShop

    Marcia Lacher from TheMillineryShop said 4 years ago

    In a way, I DON'T feel bad for Emily. She knowingly purchased her 15 albums and stole the other 10, 850 songs. I'm a starving artist too but I paid for every song I own (which is much much less than 11,000). I buy my music, not just because it is wrong to rip of musicians, but because it is wrong to rip off anyone - a lesson that most of us learned already, which helps us tell right from wrong. Wow, announcing that on the internet. Talk about putting your foot in your mouth...

  • BLCouture

    Bernadette Rothlisberger from BLCouture said 4 years ago

    My daughter and I have this debate every time she downloads a free song (she is 23) while I go out and buy the whole cd. I believe it is theft while she does not believe she is doing anything wrong. Yet she would never think of taking something from a store without paying for it. I do not understand her logic here. It is a debate worth delving into.

  • littlepancakes

    Melissa Pancakes from littlepancakes said 4 years ago

    During my college years napster and limewire were hugely popular. SInce everyone was doing it, it somehow didn't seem illegal until people started getting sued. That was 10 years ago and today I can say that I pretty much pay for all my music. Maybe it's because I'm older, or because I know what it's like to have your work copied and not get paid for it. I don't know. But I agree, I'd rather have an album than 2 $5 lattes.

  • franz66

    franz66 from franz66 said 4 years ago

    I find it odd that you ask "how do we recreate the music industry as a system that rewards artists in a world of file sharing?" It is the music INDUSTRY's responsibility to do this themself, as they are the one (and I am talking about the industry here, as I assume you were, meaning the executives, studios, producers, lawyers, etc.., NOT the creatives.) who grew the monolith that failed disasterously to flex with the times as they evolved and set themselves up to profit at artists' expense in the first place. Artists have been the ones to flex and change and morph and shift with the times to try and make livings off of their creativity without buying into the "industry" that seeks to suck them dry.

  • franz66

    franz66 from franz66 said 4 years ago

    This is also a kind of odd post to find on etsy of all places where copyrighted images/logos/etc are everywhere, being ripped off blatantly by "artists" and not being regulated by the etsy-people-in-charge.

  • MegansMenagerie

    Megan from MegansMenagerie said 4 years ago

    I teach this to my daughter. She is young but understands. I just feel better about paying for music then ripping someone off. I wouldn't want to be ripped off for my hard work so why do it to someone else.

  • ahashim Admin

    Ahmed Hashim from ahashim said 4 years ago

    Long live phonograph cylinders!

  • DreamsandJewelry

    Andrea Bonelli from AndreaBonelliJewelry said 4 years ago

    I pay for my music because it's the right thing to do and I preach this to my daughter as well.

  • Krystyna81

    Kristina from Krystyna81 said 4 years ago

    Peer pressure in this arena is rampant. I once asked in the forums "What was your favorite recent music purchase?" and was scoffed at - I felt so stupid! - that I had actually PAID for music that enjoyed listening to and wanted to add to my playlist. Now, I wish I could turn the table and proudly state that I would have paid twice the price - and gladly. The unlimited joy gained from art, music, or otherwise that you have paid for is infinitely greater than the joy gained from those obtained illegally.

  • spacefem

    spacefem from spacefem said 4 years ago

    Music piracy wasn't about stealing, or our generation being naive about what it takes to be a digital artist. It was about the record companies failing, forever, to provide a realistic means of distribution. They insisted that we stand up, go to record stores on TUESDAYS, buy a CD that cost them less to produce than any media that came before it, make no backup copies... just fork over cash. And when we didn't buy it, they complained that we were being unfair? Like White said, we are a generation that wants to do the right thing. It's sad that some industries wanted so badly to keep us in the dark ages that they tried to put the brakes on whenever they could. I pay for music all the time now, I buy it on itunes, renew my pandora subscription. But those services came about despite the record companies, who never wanted to make it easy for us to pay... they just wanted us to all be criminals.

  • yourauntiespanties

    Genevieve F from YourAuntiesPanties said 4 years ago

    very thought provoking....I wonder where I stand here, as I have amassed a large music collection, but only through second hand purchases!

  • styleforlife

    Emily from styleforlife said 4 years ago

    Very cool article. Love it. XOXOXO EL Vintage

  • elit716

    Elena from TheCraftyRascal said 4 years ago

    The bottom line here that is fundamentally forgotten is that markets evolve and the buyers and sellers must evolve with them to stay competitive. If commodities like coffee can be sold for 4$ plus and people are willing to pay for them as pointed out, the music industry and music artists can come up with innovative ways of selling their work which is different from the album format. Breaking free from the album format has allowed more artists to get away from previously constraining album producers, and innovate in how they sell their work and get discovered. Plenty of artists have done this successfully already. Unfortunately or fortunately being artist is not only about a great product much more goes into it, and the approach needs to continue to evolve.

  • SweetSincerity

    Bethany Coulombe from SweetSincerity said 4 years ago

    As artists, I think many of us experience this unfair trend. As consumers, we might even add to it. We forget that there are people behind the music, working hard to make a living. I'm sure many artists have encountered a similar phenomena when a customer tells them that they are charging too much for an item that took many hours to make. People forget that in this age of mass production there are still people putting their own blood, sweat, and tears into their work, and rightly deserve to be compensated for that.

  • HomeStudio

    Stef and Mark from HomeStudio said 4 years ago

    love David Lowery's quote

  • paintmydog

    Justine Osborne from paintmydog said 4 years ago

    More and more artists, writers and musicians are selling work directly to their fans, with book releases, album downloads, etc, perhaps this will become the primary way, and customers will feel more responsibility and incentive to reward the creator?

  • ErikaPrice

    Erika from ErikaPrice said 4 years ago

    Thought provoking article. Surely someone taught Emily that it was wrong to take things without paying for them?

  • HoodVintageandWool

    Elisabeth Ryan from hoodwool said 4 years ago

    thanks for the article. i think many people have a tendency of not wanting to fork over money for things as immaterial as music, even though these things add so much value and meaning to our lives. Go to local shows and buy merch- you are buying someone dinner or filling thier gas tank. I love that many bands are selling vinyl now (and alot of times with a download card.)

  • BreakTheRecord

    Stacey Iden from BreakTheRecord said 4 years ago

    Loved this article!!!! Well, they say there is no such thing as bad publicity. At least Emily White is a name many know now. She might have to take a lot of heat for her honest article, but I'm sure it is not going to hurt her career in any way. The whole file-sharing music piracy subject just really saddens me. It is my dream to one day open a huge music store just like back in the days when I was a kid. Full of the largest selection of vinyls, cassettes, and CD's ever. For me one of the greatest aspects of purchasing a new album is the hunt. I love flipping thru from record to record (or CD's these days when I'm in my local Target Store.) A quote from this article really does put it into perspective..."many are willing to pay $5 for a latte they’ll consume once, but not $9.99 for an album that lasts a lifetime." I'm a crazy crazy music super fan though, so I choose music over a lot of things. I would much rather buy concert tickets than a new pair of shoes if I have a few extra bucks. In fact, in the past week I purchased tickets for Rockstar Uproar concert to see my favorite rock band and tickets to see my all time favorite singer Elton John the following night. And, since I have two little girls, age 12 and age, we went to Target last week to buy the new Justin Beiber CD. I try to influence my kids and tell them all the reasons I prefer to buy the actual CD at the store as opposed to just buying it on iTunes.

  • PatchworkTrails

    Terri Wilhelm from PatchworkTrails said 4 years ago

    I think Emily White should be ashamed of herself! Just because you can get something for free doesn't mean you should. I am currently a student and don't have a job, so my funds are tight. That means I have to make sacrifices. But I would much rather spend my money on music than other luxuries because I love music and the artists deserve to get paid for their work. Anyone who does a job deserves to get fair compensation for their hard work, no matter what they do.

  • Belka808

    Belka808 from BisforBelka said 4 years ago

    I will never buy another CD, if I can help it. I was so very happy when iTunes came out, and now I can simply buy the songs I like. No more paying $14.99 for the one or two songs that I like and a bunch of crap filler songs.

  • Gosyma

    Lisa Harling from Gosyma said 4 years ago

    I love the way David Lowery explains it. I wonder if Emily even thought about it or just blindly followed the crowd unquestioningly. Perhaps her eyes are opening now. Music always had a deep personal connection for me, either from seeing the band, or having those heartfelt discussions with the guy working at the music store. A small shop I once had a lot to do with became the centre of a strong community of local bands and music enthusiasts. It was magnetic. It failed to adapt though. It's not only the musicians who suffer.

  • bedouin

    Nicole from bedouin said 4 years ago

    As Erykah Badu says " I'm an artist and I'm sensitive about my S$%T " I still buy cd's ... I still buy albums especially when the artist takes the time to put vinyl out there.

  • mazedasastoat

    mazedasastoat from mazedasastoat said 4 years ago

    Stealing is stealing, however you want to dress it up. I see no reason why a CD should be a lifetime investment, any more than a mug bought from a potter is likely to last forever. I've bought several copies of many of my favourite albums, first on vinyl, then cassette for the car, then CD. Sometimes they get lost, broken or stolen ("borrowed") & have to be replaced. But I'd never dream of downloading a copy. I don't think it's as simple as just wanting to own something physical for your money, although downloading does appear to lessen the value of music in people's perspective, possibly because a physical item is not acquired.

  • UUPP

    UUPP from UUPP said 4 years ago

    Great article. I have always felt that just because it is easy to 'take' something, like music without paying for it, doesn't make it right. Someone else created it and deserves to be compensated. As artists, we want the same respect for our own work.

  • TheWishingWardrobe

    Molly Phoenix from TheWishingWardrobe said 4 years ago

    As an artist I live on a shoestring budget...Many of my friends are musicians so I am not comfortable with "stealing" music, and having gone from LPs to cassette to CDs I have purchased some albums 3 times! (who can live without REM?) ...the result is a music collection that is sorely lacking in fresh new music. I don't know the solution, but I would love to be able to freshen up my collection because people were more appreciative of one of a kind hand made art.

  • slathered

    Sharon Moores from slathered said 4 years ago

    I haven't thought about David Lowery in probably 20 years. But now I heart him again.

  • slathered

    Sharon Moores from slathered said 4 years ago

    I have never downloaded free music, but I buy a number of books and CDs/vinyl from used-book stores. I wonder if I am no better than young Emily.

  • jorgensenstudio

    jorgensenstudio from jorgensenstudio said 4 years ago

    It is stealing and just because a generation has made it the norm doesn't make it any less so. We have to change the culture in order to change the mindset, just like smoking, not wearing seatbelts, and sweatshops have become culturally taboo so we have to make pirating media an unacceptable idea.

  • ballandchain

    Katrina Balling from ballandchain said 4 years ago

    great article.

  • Xenotees

    Xenotees from Xenotees said 4 years ago

    I was taking a short break from NPR, and news in general- so I must have missed this story! Wow!! David Lowery's response is so insightful- I love it. Being the wife of a musician, I'm deeply aware of how important this issue is. I will continue to buy CDs, LPs (vinyl forever!), and purchase downloads whenever I have the funds. It's for sure as important to me as buying that pound of fair-trade coffee, or sweat-shop free clothing!

  • ProbablePossible

    ProbablePossible from ProbablePossible said 4 years ago

    I am quite positive that both Emily and NPR totally knew that they would raise a controversy. Young interns are far more internet savvy than we patronizing oldsters. Honest. Those of you who really think the pirating problem affects the artists, think again. The folk with the most to lose are the old school record companies, who are watching their hold over the market disappear and are squawking like chickens on the chopping block about it. Buy an album and the artist makes all of six cents. Guess who keeps the rest?

  • jazziones

    jazziones from LittleBlackVanities said 4 years ago

    My generation bought and collected 45 and 33 rpm records and albums, which became essentially obsolete, then we replaced our favorites with 4 and 8 track tapes which are obsolete, then cassette tapes which also became obsolete, and then CD's, so if what Professor Lowery says is true, the Millennial generation will be lucky indeed if 9.99 buys an album for life.

  • CatalyticInk

    Malia Harrison from CatalyticInk said 4 years ago

    Really eye opening and interesting article. Something to keep in mind the next time you want that latte

  • CatalyticInk

    Malia Harrison from CatalyticInk said 4 years ago

    We are a generation that expects instant gratification This is a good and bad thing

  • laurenblass

    Lauren Blass said 4 years ago

    I must be lazier than most. Purchasing music from itunes is simply easier than stealing it.

  • yimmekedesign

    Diana from yimmekedesign said 4 years ago

    Very interesting indeed. The cyber world enriches us as it makes us poor, proving that everything in life is relative. We have to make our personal choices in these matters and try to look at them from everybody's perspective. Share, do with less, find a good cause to give to,or... ADOPT A MUSICIAN !!!

  • suchprettycolors

    suchprettycolors from SuchPrettyColors said 4 years ago

    Others have made this point, but it's a very important one. The people losing the most money are the 'industry', not the artists. The music and movie industries insist on selling us a DRM-crippled product, an annoying, hard to use product. If you look at the success of Louis CK's self-produced project, you'll see that people actually are very willing to pay for 'fair-trade' music, comedy, etc.

  • lizhutnick

    Liz Hutnick from LizHutnick said 4 years ago

    A friend once asked me to make a copy of an album. I went and bought her the cd. There was no way I'd make a copy of it. No way. I wish more people felt that way about art. All art.

  • NicePots

    Cynthia Spencer from NicePots said 4 years ago

    I'm glad that the fair trade issue was brought up as comparison. I hope it helps get more artists their due.

  • GoldenSpiralDesigns

    Lola Ocian from GoldenSpiralDesigns said 4 years ago Featured

    This topic comes up fairly often in my household, because we're all avid listeners and creators of music. What a great article! Some really good points regarding the value of artist's rights and the comparison of those other things we strive for nowadays - such as fair trade, etc... I love Pandora and Grooveshark, which allow me to listen to music on-demand. I love buying albums though, because they are a work of art in themselves. CD's and LP's are more than just recorded songs - they're a full package of intentional art that can be as much fun to peruse and consume, as the music can be to listen to. And, thankfully, many albums these days come with a coupon for free digital download of the album with purchase. That way you can listen to it at home, as well as on the go.

  • elleestpetite

    Donna Thai from PetiteCuisine said 4 years ago

    I am by no means a music junkie, but my boyfriend is. And he is a firm believer in supporting artists through buying albums. We often have the discussion about the downside to downloading free music. Usually the conversation ends with the both of us deciding that we wouldn't want to live in a world where vinyl records and CDs were obsolete.

  • NikNakNook

    Susan M from NikNakNook said 4 years ago

    the fair thing is simple - buy original works instead of stealing them.

  • CraftySueShop

    Crafty Sue from CraftySueShop said 4 years ago

    Part of the blame for this generation having a "why should I pay for it" view should go the the industry itself. I'm not defending the "why should I pay for it" generation; in fact my day job is copyright licensing for record companies and I'm as worried about the state of the industry as anyone. That said, it was the record industry that purposely did away with 45 rpm singles specifically to force people to buy whole albums. When digital downloads came along, many record companies refused for a long time to participate or allow their recordings to be distributed that way. Even after the record companies got on board (once it was clear that iTunes ruled the world), there were some very notable long-time holdouts (The Beatles, to name one...) There's a long history of not making music available to people the way they want to buy it. So now, they just steal it. The "why buy it" generation certainly needs to be better educated, and understand that stealing music is the same as walking into a store and shoplifting. And the industry needs to get with the program and adapt to technology- right away, not years later. Me, I prefer to buy CDs, but good luck even finding them anywhere. Some record companies don't even offer new releases in physical formats.

  • ArtsyFlair

    Michaela Bowles from ArtsyFlair said 4 years ago

    Great article!

  • mooshoopork

    mooshoo from mooshoopork said 4 years ago

    I think its a matter of what people value... now a days anything can be copied, stolen, or mass produced.. ideas can be taken and sold at a cheaper cost in almost any venue. Music is no exception. some people pay $5 for a coffee and steel music. some people pay $10 for a CD and steal others art... and like you said..people with personal connections to some form of art seem to be more sensitive to the issue. Its a great discussion.

  • paramountvintage

    kristin from blackmoonsky said 4 years ago Featured

    this is such a great article with two strongly opposed sides. i am a musician who has released albums on independent labels. free online file sharing helped draw attention to the album and brought an audience to our shows. it was actually a huge help. and most of the listeners still purchase music.... on vinyl. people will pay for music, but it has to be tangible, artistic, and quality. this should be the new focus for major labels. music, like any art, can be shared once it goes viral.

  • mimishingleton

    Mimi from aTreasureInStore said 4 years ago

    Great article and this has been a topic in our house as well. I want to read her blog post right away!

  • csburdick

    csburdick from callmebrazen said 4 years ago

    This brings up some fantastic points regarding the discussions we should be having about how artists in 2012 make a consistent profit. I, too buy my coffee fair trade and anything else I can get my hands on. Why should music be any different? Now, I want to and likely will go pick up the self released vinyl album of the amazing local band I saw at the Burlington Jazzfest.

  • GracefullyGirly

    Kimberlee from GracefullyGirly said 4 years ago

    Very, very thought provoking. I love Pandora and would happily support musicians through them with more cost than I currently pay (it's typically free to listen but they have ads occasionally which those companies certainly pay for). It's a great service and product tailor made to my wide range of listening desires. I would even pay at least a little something for that great service if I knew it was also going to the musicians. I think their set up is as close as I could get to a perfect system for me. I like a lot of lesser-known artists so I consider it even more important to support their work. After all, they tend to earn lots less at concerts and through other venues. They deserve to be supported!

  • julennemermella

    Julienne Mermella said 4 years ago

    Great article. Loved it .I am glade that the fair trade issue was brought up.

  • WOLFEANDRABBIT

    Jude Mott from WOLFEANDRABBIT said 4 years ago

    if i could download a $5 latte you bet your ass i would. Id do it again and again. If i could manage to steal a latte every time i went to the coffee shop and get away with it i would.

  • dunne1

    Lisa Dunne-Jackson from RoofTopCreations said 4 years ago

    Maybe I am showing my age here, but I still buy real CDs. I do this mainly because I want a physical object to show for my purchase! In the age of digital music, younger people who have grown up completely in the digital age sometimes don't see the "physical object" that they are downloading. But it is an object, one that was imagined and created by a hard working artist. I also like my real CDs because I worry what will happen to my "itune" library in 10 or 15 years. After all, most of my regular computer files from 15 years ago are gone. Those floppy discs or hard discs might be stored around here somewhere, but my current computer has no drive to open them. I didn't preserve them because I didn't see them as real objects. With CDs and vinyl, I am good as long as I can find a working CD player and turntable around. (We even have a victrola to play 78s!) Recently, my college age son told me how excited he was to find a Philly record store selling newly manufactured vinyl albums from current bands. Apparantly, vinyl could be making a comeback so I showed him the 400 plus vinyl albums in my attic. I realized that if these were computer "files", I probably wouldn't have made the effort to preserve most of them. So please folks, pay for your music. And if for some bizarre you're not comfortable paying for a simple digital download, do it like I do and buy it at Best Buy!

  • CraftySueShop

    Crafty Sue from CraftySueShop said 4 years ago

    At least artists get a royalty from Pandora. A tiny one, but at least they get something.

  • MishaGirl

    Michelle from MishaGirl said 4 years ago

    Radio stations and internet stations like Pandora play music you like for free....you go to a friends house and you listen to their music for free....so add that to the mix and it's not hard to see where people might think- why buy? Radio station, your pal's playlist or download stuff for free (albeit illegal)- will seem all the same to most people. And, it's available and easy to do. Heck, remember the days when we had stereos that could record your favorite song from the radio, or an album, or another cassette tape (c'mon.....birth of the 'mixed tape' really!)? I'll bet just as many folks were doing that back then as are downloading music off the internet without paying now. I'm not saying it's right-- but this gal is only following the path already paved by generations before her.

  • Maquinna

    Maquinna said 4 years ago

    I'm a photographer, and we must deal with all these same issues. People have no problem appropriating our images without compensating us. As digital technology has progressed - in both the music industry and the imaging industry - there seems to be less and less appreciation for the creativity and labour that goes into our art. People have no compunction about blithely taking images and removing watermarks from them, just as they do not hesitate to copy music. If they *can* do it, they will. We are constantly looking for ways to make it more difficult to take our images from digital sources, but somehow it never sinks in that this is how we make our livelihood. Of course we charge money for our work. Don't you?

  • 5gardenias

    kathi roussel from 5gardenias said 4 years ago

    I have to say -- and I'm sure it's a reflection of my generation-- but I still love buying music in the form of CDs and vinyl-- i adore having my collection of music on hand and let's not forget that there are also great album and CD cover and booklet designs that add to the pleasure of collecting music-- when art and the songs lyrics can be viewed along with the full playlist of music created in the order that the musicians intended that it be listened to. I can understand why file sharing has become the norm,-- it's free and easy-- but I think people are missing out a bit when they do it. Hopefully more people will start to think about the argument that Lowery poses, and consider it important to support musicians by paying for the music they've-- if not all the time, then at least some of the time.

  • 5gardenias

    kathi roussel from 5gardenias said 4 years ago

    I have to say -- and I'm sure it's a reflection of my generation-- but I still love buying music in the form of CDs and vinyl-- i adore having my collection of music on hand and let's not forget that there are also great album and CD cover and booklet designs that add to the pleasure of collecting music-- when art and the songs lyrics can be viewed along with the full playlist of music created in the order that the musicians intended that it be listened to. I can understand why file sharing has become the norm,-- it's free and easy-- but I think people are missing out a bit when they do it. Hopefully more people will start to think about the argument that Lowery poses, and consider it important to support musicians by paying for the music they've created-- if not all the time, then at least some of the time.

  • TheMillersHouse

    Miller from TheMillersHouse said 4 years ago

    Interesting read. I'm in the middle.

  • Iammie

    iammie from iammie said 4 years ago

    Interesting!

  • ginacrg

    ginacrg said 4 years ago

    Somehow I missed this firestorm last week! Today, as I was buying a cd, I wondered why anyone would buy only 1 song when they could have the cd, all the songs & liner notes? After all, it's all part of the package. What if you lost your MP3 or it deleted all your music, start over?! I listen to programs, commercials, programs on radio & tv w/a pen & paper to write the info for songs, I am the last one at the movie, always finish the credits, who wrote the music? Then I go looking for the cd or artist. If we don't support the arts, not just music (I love music, I cannot live w/o such lovely inspiration), all art, where will the inspiration for new come from? Sorry this is so long, but we have to save the arts. I am listening to the soundtrack from Tangled now, so much fun! My grandkids introduced me to this music!

  • hrrn

    Heather Rose-Nagel said 4 years ago

    I have always paid for my own music. I have no problem with this. I do however think 70 years after death (the current length of a copyright) is way too long. It's another way of crushing creativity supposedly in the name of supporting artists.

  • Tacyda

    Tacyda said 4 years ago Featured

    Being a slightly *cough* older generation - I've always bought my music. Even if someone sends me files - if I love it, I feel an obligation to buy it. However, as music distribution evolves, I do love the fact that I can now buy directly from the artist and will do so whenever possible.

  • gallery32

    Trina from Gallery32Photography said 4 years ago

    I work with some younger people who don't pay for music. Some of them are artist themselves yet when it comes to music the rules don't apply for them. They feel as if they are only stealing from the record company not the artist. Like stealing batteries from WalMart. To them cooperations are not people. I have never downloaded music for free. I would feel to guilty. Somebody spent the time to make the music and I should pay to listen to it. Thanks for sharing :)

  • CafePrimrose

    Amanda Gynther from CafePrimrose said 4 years ago

    Here is the thing though, Most artists make a couple pennies off of each album sold. Ok, it adds up. Ofcourse. Still, getting money grubby over a few pennies?! Then there is who really gets the pay day from CD sales. It isn't the musician. It is the label. Which brings us constantly bad boy bands and garbage like The Pussy Cat Dolls. Who absolutely all should have had fabulous carreers as dancers or runway models.... But as musicians... errr.... Nooo..... You aren't even paying to hear the artist that is kinda another major point. When I make something, you get it in all it's handmade glory. When they make a CD, they do all this stuff to it, till you don't even really hear what the musician even sounds like. Which kinda makes a new point, if we buy CDs we are not even hearing the people we are paying to hear. Because it's all done over by a synthesizer. The truth is a VERY rare few of them sound good when they sing or play music. But they all sound perfect and wonderful on the DVD. These labels don't make music. They make perfection and a way for pretty faces to hide bad music. And as a musician, who trained for over 10 years with my instrument and that continues to train today, I want to pay for what I am getting. I want to hear the people I am paying to hear. I don't need to hear a bunch of recording tricks done by dishonest labels that no longer even seek musicians but runway models that they can make sound good. I went to university for music. I have made a couple demos in my time. I have worked with the techies in the studio. I know what happens when a CD is made. I see no reason to pay if I am not actually getting what I pay for. When you download something, it is no different than when you borrow a book from a friend. The publishing companies don't seem to have a problem with that. The music industry is much more money grubby. They have created a lifestyle they wish to continue. Their living it high isn't my problem. And If i can borrow a book from a friend why not an album of music? If someone wants to borrow that album in turn from me, what is the problem? Though, I suppose that is where the legal area becomes gray..... I am a musician. I have never and would never ask anyone to pay for my art. Especially if it isn't even me anymore because they have edited the life out of it in the studio. They say it is dishonest to borrow music like books. I say it is dishonest to sell us musical artists that don't even sound like themselves while advertising that is who it is.

  • janinebasil

    Janine from JanineBasil said 4 years ago

    You can't compare a latte and a CD. There are very very different reasons that a latte is $5 and a CD $10.

  • dustybugger

    Jamie said 4 years ago

    Question: paid intern? My guess is probably not. She would prob accept a free cup of fair trade coffee too if it was offered to her. I'm a strong supporter of capitalism but when you're 30k+ in student loans and the only thing you can get is a FREE JOB, you stop caring if 17 year old Bieber who probably drives a 500k CAR and thinks he's on Forbes #3 most infuential list (ahead of the President) because he makes good songs and calls the Sistine Chapel the 16th chapel, well you know where I'm going, he's not missing it. Now me, I just buy the CDs in case the drive crashes and if I really like the artist.

  • AeridesDesigns

    AeridesDesigns from AeridesDesigns said 4 years ago

    It's not just the millenials. I grew up sifting thru vinyl at the record store, but my Dad was an early Napster user... It used to be artists toured to great record sales... now they create a record/content to support a new tour. But a new artist who has yet to have any name recognition has an uphill battle unlike their predecessors.

  • denimndaisydesigns

    denimndaisydesigns from denimndaisydesigns said 4 years ago

    I was a teenager in the 80's and I used to tape songs off the radio, as everyone did, and not an issue was raised. Most likely because it couldn't be tracked. I think the price of what the recording companies charge is ridiculous! I don't know where everyone is buying albums for $1-10...They are around $15 to $18 a piece for one or two songs you will actually listen to. Consumers drive the market, and obviously we aren't willing to pay that much for something that is not convienient and we only want a portion of it. I invested hundreds of dollars on my itunes collection that I can't even access now. Even if you buy the song, you are only allowed 5 downloads for that song, for life. Did you really buy it? Or were you just paying to listen to it, until your computer crashes, your ipod breaks or your computer gets a virus. What if you buy a song and your kids download and listen? It's not that hard to lose digital music and it's at the mercy of technology. By the way, I don't and never have illegally downloaded music. I listen to internet and airwave radio now. I may buy a song to download directly to my computer, but it's not often. And I do not buy $5 lattes either. Instead of complaining, the industry needs to change. They don't need to manufacture, package, and sell and deliver to the stores...their expenses have gone down and so should their price. Maybe if they stop paying so many lawyers and focused instead on fixing the problem, they might make money again. It should allow the artists to get more out of it as well. And they should stop treating their potential customers as criminals when the issue is their failure to change.

  • BigRockPaperCo

    Melissa Cyrenne from BigRockWeddingFavors said 4 years ago

    People are forgetting the point- if she has that large of an iTunes library-- she did in fact pay the artists for their work- she just didn't buy the whole album. And believe me... iTunes can be expensive! I just take a look at my credit card statement after a night of drinking with my buddies!!

  • ericawalker

    Erica Walker from WalkerSilverworks said 4 years ago

    if you are a downloader there are plenty of ways to pay for music...through retail sites like Amazon, itunes, etc. or better still direct through indie label and artist sites. It's easy to do the right thing.

  • vintagejuno

    Juno Vintage from VintageJuno said 4 years ago

    Great article.

  • Musclesandcrafts

    Melanie from merVazi said 4 years ago

    I believe in supporting the artist. My husband and I buy CDs whenever we can. The biggest problem with buying CDs is that most of the time you can't get the CD. I have ordered CDs and waited for up to 6 weeks for one to arrive, so I can see how it is easier to steal it. We simply like having CDs, and sometimes we even listen to my husband's vinyl collection. For anyone who is a true audiophile, the quality of a CD is WAY better than the quality of any itunes download. Mind you, I've never downloaded from itunes, only heard on a quality stereo how those files sound.....

  • Musclesandcrafts

    Melanie from merVazi said 4 years ago

    I've never downloaded illegally, and don't intend to. Everyone here should understand the concept of what that does to your art.

  • lindyw7

    lindyw7 said 4 years ago

    When I was in high school and junior high, people started downloading stuff from Napster--it was all new and a lot of people didn't really know what to make of it, and for a long time, it didn't cross anyone's mind (including my own) that it was indeed stealing. But then, I got older, and realized that downloading music without paying for it was still stealing and deleted all of it from my iPod. Unfortunately, there was nothing I could do about the albums that I'd burned for friends, although I'm sure that karmically, I've paid for it one way or another. Anyhow, my philosophy is that if you can't pay for something that you want, then it doesn't belong to you to begin with. Like Sheryl Crow said, "it's not having what you want; it's wanting what you've got."

  • TheLittleRagamuffin

    Jenny from TheLittleRagamuffin said 4 years ago

    My husband and I have recorded music together for over ten years now, but this past year was the first time we parted from the DIY CD and decided to sink some real money into one of our creations. We paid an artist friend of ours to design the incredible cover art and outsourced the replication process to a small start up print shop. We were so happy to be able to support these small businesses, though unfortunately we are still in debt to ourselves since we haven't sold enough copies to repay our investment. We are so grateful when friends and fans purchase our music, as they are not only supporting us, but a cast of characters who worked hard to create the physical CD itself. I am quite shocked at how forthright people can be, admitting right to us that they burned a copy of our album from a friend -but those who do the noble deed of shelling out a few dollars are supporting the creative cycle, and the songs of the future...and that is something to be praised.

  • inthesew

    inthesew from inthesew said 4 years ago

    Watch but one episode of MTV Cribs and I guarantee you will never feel bad for those poor starving musicians again. Even the one hit wonders have a california mansion. And If only those digital copies lasted.... I had put all my music from cds into itunes, then got rid of the cds--- the computer crashed and I was left with NOTHING. None of the music I had fairly paid for by buying cds.

  • NicoleNicoletta

    NicoleNicoletta from NicoleNicoletta said 4 years ago

    thoughtful article...i also feel bad for emily...i don't think she realized the backfire she would get for such an honest comment.

  • judes86

    Jude G said 4 years ago

    You make a really good point about people's willingness to hand over $5 for a coffee but their reluctance to pay for albums. I had never thought of it in that way before. I'm not entirely sure what you mean by saying you grew up on the 'digital divide'. My understanding is that the digital divide refers to the gap between those who have access to technology and those that do not, primarily for economic reasons...

  • greatestfriend

    greatestfriend from GreatestFriend said 4 years ago

    It's a great point to make that knowing artists personally means one tends to buy albums, rather than download them for free. Having worked as a tour manager for 12 years before "retiring" - (to my vintage selling hobby that accidentally took off...) - I took years to be able to "take" music without paying and then it was with a cringe and only old and rare recordings. But now another handful of years out of the music biz later, and feeling my knowledge of all the newest and greatest albums dilute, my passion still strong, and my purse strings pulled tight, I can't help but turn to Spotify knowing that if i love an album I'll but it for sure, as one thing a good ear comes to realise is - that no matter what generation - vinyl and cassettes sound SO MUCH BETTER.

  • greatestfriend

    greatestfriend from GreatestFriend said 4 years ago

    correction: ....if i love an album I'll buy it for sure, as one thing a good ear comes to realise is - that no matter what generation - vinyl and cassettes sound SO MUCH BETTER than MP3s. by a long, long way.

  • LittleWrenPottery

    Victoria Baker from LittleWrenPottery said 4 years ago

    I do think the music industry has been slow to change its course on things like file sharing, its a difficult market where people are encouraged to give things away just to get their name 'out there'...

  • CougarTShirtCompany

    Cougar T-Shirt Company from CougarTShirtCompany said 4 years ago

    As a designer, I know how I would feel if people took my t-shirt designs and used them with no compensation to me. I feel the NPR person probably knew it was wrong to own 11,000 songs and to only have paid for 15. How would the writer feel if she had written a book, only to have people download it for free instead of buying it.

  • windycitynovelties

    Windy City Novelties said 4 years ago

    Being young myself and growing up in a family of entrepreneurs, I have understood how important support is. Whenever a friend asks me if I would like a copy of a new CD or movie that just came out, I always decline and say I will buy it myself. Spending money on movies and music shows great respect and support to the artists and actors who work countless hours to create what they believe is a masterpiece.

  • SewTechnicolor

    Kristin H from SewTechnicolor said 4 years ago

    I've always bought my music, starting with the boy bands that (somehow :) made me fall in love with music. I still have all of those awful Backstreet Boys and N*Sync CDs, for nostalgic reasons. I love having a physical CD, just like I love vinyl records. There's something special about having something tangible to hold in your hands- something that the digital downloads completely lack. I only buy CDs on iTunes when it's hard for me to find them in stores (or individual songs when I don't want the whole CD). And even when I buy albums digitally, I automatically burn them to a real CD so I have backup if my computer crashes. I have never downloaded music illegally or burned CDs from friends. Once, when I was first getting into oldies music, I made copies of two CDs I had checked out from the library- a Sinatra one and a Glenn Miller one. I still feel guilty about that! I haven't done it since. :) {Even though those artists are dead and technically aren't making any more money for their work.}

  • LCooperDesigns

    LC Cooper from LeMaisonBelle said 4 years ago

    Marcia Lacher from TheMillineryShop says: In a way, I DON'T feel bad for Emily. She knowingly purchased her 15 albums and stole the other 10, 850 songs. ------- I agree - sorry Emily...but even the smallest of children know that stealing is wrong. And, please, don't blame it on your generation - they get enough flak as it is.

  • JodiBauter

    Jodi Bauter from JodiBauter said 4 years ago

    I am an artist myself. But I still don't think people should go to jail or have to pay such huge fines that they are economically destroyed by pirating music. Don't get me wrong. I don't want some one stealing my art and calling it theirs either. But I don't think our rights should extend over 100 years either. Content should be allowed to enter public domain so that people can share and use it after a much shorter period of time. The time table is debatable though. People copied music with cassette tapes and shared it all the time before technology advances I don't see why people shouldn't be allowed to share from others now just because things are digital. There is a lot more to this issue than just not paying for an album. I changed my mind after watching a documentary called RIP-A Remix Manifesto. I recommend people look it up and check it out. It was very interesting. This topic is very interesting.

  • TatianSuicide

    LadyTatian Suicide from ThoughtfulDesigns said 4 years ago

    Great Article. I am friends with a lot of music artists - I understand their struggle with filing sharing. It is no easy thing to solve. What I want to know is, when did we draw the line between a physical item stolen from a physical store and a digital item? - stealing is stealing, right? :( I feel sorry for Emily. It was not the best idea to post a blog admitting that she has basically stolen thousands of songs : / ...idk what she was thinking - the fact that she shared that in a blog, tells me we have a bigger problem: Why are these (kids) thinking it is okay in the first place? ...do they really have to have some personal connection with a musician to know it is wrong to take things that do not belong to them?

  • asundrynotion

    asundrynotion from asundrynotion said 4 years ago

    While music theft is the most obvious example, the core issue is a gross lack of comprehension of intellectual property rights in all its forms. On occasion I've denied use of my content to others and been told by the indignant party "you have copyrights to nothing". Ignorance and arrogance are a troublesome combination. Far more awareness and education of artists' rights, copyright law is needed.

  • ElaineMari

    Elaine Mari from ElaineMari said 4 years ago

    Very very interesting thread. I have been mulling over the line between digital sharing and stealing for a while now. So much to think about when it comes to legislation around this whole issue.

  • AlinaandT

    Alina from AlinaandT said 4 years ago

    Music industry just needs a general update and stop whining about declining sales. In quite some time now bands/artists don't make the majority of their own money (not the label they belong to but their OWN) from album sales but from live acts. So all the controversy is pointless to even discuss. And to those who pay $5 for a cup of *bucks coffee or similar chain, do you honestly believe the say the $3 difference from a regular cup of coffee goes to the people who grew/picked it? A lot of this is just another marketing trick to get the hipster/younger crowd in. Just cut some of the middlemen and things will be a lot easier and more important FAIR on either sides: artists and fans/consumers.

  • Zalavintage

    Zane Saracene from Zalavintage said 4 years ago

    love the comments...from an older member who felt an obligation to purchase, to Emily who felt no such responsibility, to one who used file sharing to draw attention to true talent successfully to one who points out the sharks running the music companies and what they take from the artists before they even see a dime of their record sales...with which I have experience as the former girlfriend of a SONY group under Tommy's reign I think it all comes down to personal choice and changing values ... the choice to take something for nothing (or in the case of the labels, take advantage of musicians who live to perform) or the freedom to purchase a person's art, or their record which was made with blood sweat and tears, that becomes a part of their soul and lives with you each and every time you play and sing along with that song, it's awareness of what matters to you

  • VeloNoir

    Christine Rimorin from VeloNoir said 4 years ago

    I'm not a professional musician but having played a musical instrument almost all my life now, I have an idea how much hard work a musician puts in mastering his/her art. When musicians perform their work, they share a part of themselves with others. Records or CDs preserve these "pieces" of themselves to be enjoyed for years to come, if not, forever. People who are too self-righteous are often blind to the fact that they have become just like the ones whom they despise--the record companies in this case. Yes, there are the rich musicians out there but the other 99% are just like you and me who are working hard for a living. Let us not deny these musicians what is rightfully theirs.

  • joelarchip

    joelarchip said 4 years ago

    I liked this article until the last paragraph.

  • clairesuzannejones

    May Belater said 4 years ago

    I enjoyed this mainly for the comments, the post doesn't seem to give much of the writers own opinion. I blogged about it myself. Pop music is pop music. If I've heard of a Swedish band, they've become popular. All this worthy authentic music naysaying. If you've got popular appeal, be it enough to fill a pub, or a stadium, its music, if noone is buying or talking about it, it's an experiment that you learn from. I like the fact that the weekly pop charts are really a thing of the past. I know for a fact that half the houses in MTV Cribs are rented by an 'artists' management for the day. I like that I can have hip hop, easy listening, death metal and classical music portable and shuffleable on me at all times. I'll pay for digital copies of songs I like rather than whole albums of filler and ugly plastic boxes all over the place. I don't want to pay for artwork and chauffeurs and legal teams and cocaine habits thanks. The music companies exploited and abused their artists for years, patronised us as consumers, so I'll buy direct from the bands I like or legal download sites for a reasonable fee. I do think however, all this starving artist thing is a little redundant in this day and age with Youtube and FB and even Myspace. The good stuff will always shine through. The rest is mediocre at best, and bloody awful in the majority.

  • AmberHeartOfTheFinch

    Nicola Hart from StarlightSilverUK said 4 years ago

    I do think it would be a different story if we knew the money was going to the artists rather than the music label that signs them. Also musicians do look like they are living a millionaire lifestyle, but once they are released from their contract they generally find out, to their dismay, that they don't actually have any money at all. Buy indie, download mainstream. A fair backlash against major corporations that in turn are fleecing their own bands.

  • smb122168

    Scott Boehler from TheVinylStraw said 2 years ago

    Well written blog.. I too was in your shoes and grabbed all the free I could.. but after meeting some musicians myself, they work hard at their craft and deserve the money.

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