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Making A Difference With Reclaim Detroit

Dec 18, 2012

by Chappell Ellison

Etsy.com handmade and vintage goods

Most Detroiters have a sense of humor about the rapidly changing condition of their city. “There’s only about 100 of us left — you sure you don’t want to be number 101?” jokes Jeremy Haines. A committed local resident, Haines is the Marketing Manager for Reclaim Detroit, an organization dedicated to salvaging materials from demolished houses and creating jobs through training employees in green deconstruction techniques.

Detroit has 76,000 vacant homes and nearly 3,000 are demolished every year. Through embracing green practices, Haines and the rest of the organization saw an opportunity for creating jobs, reusing valuable resources and limiting the impact on landfills. “On the first house we deconstructed, we were able to reuse or recycle 90% of the material,” says Haines. “We’ve deconstructed seven full houses and a smattering of small projects. So you can imagine the impact we could make to helping the environment if we did 30 or 40 houses a year.”

Reclaim Detroit recently made headlines when they held a wooden toymaking workshop where attendees used salvaged wood from deconstructed homes to build toy trains, many of which went to disadvantaged children all over the city. Lisa Grace, the Development Director for WARM Training Center where Reclaim Detroit was incubated, acknowledges the power of these handmade objects. “I like to think of our toys as a gateway. They suck you in, and then you have these beautiful pieces created by these people and you find out their histories and the background of the house where they came from, and you realize something bigger is going on here.” The organization dreams big; Reclaim Detroit hopes to inspire a new local economy that will support new job growth and provide unprecedented opportunities to locals and their neighborhood.

Reclaim Detroit

Salvaging wood from a vacant home.

When word got out that Reclaim Detroit was dismantling old houses and building everything from toys to planters, the organization was overwhelmed with phone calls from artists looking to use the salvaged wood. “Every component of the house is raw material for artisans to use,” says Haines, noting that some craftspeople have even transformed reclaimed nails into jewelry. Architecture organizations are approaching Reclaim Detroit for building materials, and even Whole Foods is looking to use as much of the group’s reclaimed wood as they can for the interior of their new store in midtown Detroit.

“I had a local guitar maker call me and say, ‘I’ve always dreamt of making a guitar out of wood from old Detroit houses. Is that possible?'” recalls Haines, who assumed the guitar maker would require exotic species of wood. As it turns out, the old growth found in reclaimed lumber from turn-of-the-century houses is exactly the type of wood that’s ideal for instruments. The guitar maker set to work on a mandolin, using reclaimed maple hardwood flooring on one side, and douglas fir from house beams on the other. “His wife suggested he should find an image of the house the wood originated from and burn it onto the back of the instrument. It’s pretty incredible,” says Haines.

One of the biggest challenges Haines and Grace now face, in addition to scaling Reclaim Detroit, is dipping into retail. The organization has begun to make cutting boards from reclaimed wood. “Jeremy and I have been working on the marketing for these cutting boards, and I feel like we’re on a runaway train,” says Grace. “We can’t even put the brakes on. We’re already getting phone calls and requests from stores. People are embracing this and they’re passionate about it.”

Reclaim Detroit

A restaurant making use of salvaged wood from Reclaim Detroit.

Reclaim Detroit is doing a good thing for the environment, but ultimately, it’s about making the city a better place for its residents. “We’re not necessarily an environmental organization,” says Grace. “We like to see ourself as a community redevelopment organization.” This means providing jobs and support for people who really need a helping hand. “We want to have a warehouse, and eventually have a retail store where we fabricate our own products,” says Haines. “The interesting possibilities with retail is that there are new training opportunities and, ultimately, new job creation. These would be higher level skills that could be a whole other job track for our employees as we grow.”

Reclaim Detroit proves that residents are ready to reclaim their city as a hub of creativity and ingenuity. Local attorneys are volunteering to look at legal documents, and retailers are donating their time to look at plans for the organization’s possible retail venture. “Detroiters are fiercely protective of what we deal with in the national media all the time,” says Grace. “We’re famous for our dilapidated, miserable buildings. But if you go a step further, we have some of the most gorgeous architecture, homes and neighborhoods of anywhere I’ve visited. We love our city, and we need to turn the page and talk about what Detroit could be in the future.”

Shop Local: Detroit

3 Featured Comments

  • HabitNation

    Rebecca and Daniel from HabitNation said 3 years ago Featured

    As a life-long resident of Michigan, I find this story absolutely heart warming and fascinating. Many times I have travelled through the area and see the broken windows, dilapidated porches, skeletal frames, and grafitti. It is a very emotional sight and I always being to think about what life "used" to be in Detroit when it was quite the happier and safer place. I am so proud to hear of some of our state's citizens working hard to make a change and give hope and a new life to a once vibrant city. The toys are amazing, and I love that a local restaurant is using reclaimed wood as furnishings. A very special way to keep history alive.

  • gertieloo88

    Mary from WoodenHeartButtons said 3 years ago Featured

    I count Detroit as one of my favorite cities. It has a slightly haunted beauty that speaks of a bygone era of booming industry and affluence. However, so much needs to be done to revitalize this great city. As someone who uses reclaimed wood in my craft, I know the hidden value of cast off materials and love these kinds of initiatives. All the best to those individuals who are trying to make a difference.

  • hasincla

    hasincla from travelwanderings said 3 years ago Featured

    Detroit, you've got heart! I am impressed not only with your ingenuity, but the overwhelming success of this project. This seems to be bringing people in the city together and building it into something that lives in people's hearts, not just on a map. Well done! I'm looking forward to hearing more.

83 comments

  • BrokenFingersArt

    Erin Inglis from COLRtheory said 3 years ago

    This is a REALLY inspiring and uplifting post. Thank you!

  • misschristiana

    Christiana Odum from YarnDarlin said 3 years ago

    This is awesome! Thanks for sharing your beautiful story.

  • EdelweissPost

    Patrick from EdelweissPost said 3 years ago

    Talk about objects with a story! I am so heartened to learn the people of Detroit are "reclaiming" their city - and in such a literal way! These toys and other re-imagined objects are oozing with a sense of history and place. Such a refreshing change from the obnoxious toys, etc. mass-produced by the endless sweat factories in Asia.

  • mirabellamorello

    mirabellamorello from mirabellamorello said 3 years ago

    I am very excited about this project! I visited Detroit for the first time about three years ago and was so very, very sad to see so many beautiful homes in conditions so bad that they could not be salvaged. It really is heartbreaking. But for someone to find a way to bring new life to some of the materials that had been used to hand-craft these homes is the very best kind of recycling! The story about the man who made the mandolin from the flooring and house beams is truly inspiring and I was very touched by his wife's suggestion to burn an image of the original house in the back! Thank you, Etsy, for this uplifting news from Detroit and thank you, Reclaim Detroit for your good work!

  • ArtDecoDame

    Desiree from ArtDecoDame said 3 years ago

    This is so awesome!

  • mattyhandmadecrafts

    Matejka Max from NattyMatty said 3 years ago

    Wonderful!

  • mazedasastoat

    mazedasastoat from mazedasastoat said 3 years ago

    Fascinating to ponder the problems of architectural salvage when the buildings being demolished are wooden rather than brick or stone. Here in the UK wooden buildings are rare, so once the intenal trim has been removed for sale (literally everything from skirting boards & doors to window catches) the main fabric of the building can be literally knocked down & still be reclaimed. Great to see a local movement taking pride in enhancing their own environment, instead of waiting for someone else to turn up & put things right. What usually happens to all the wood in a demolished American building?

  • cdelahiguera

    Cassandra de la Higuera from FigTreeJewellery said 3 years ago

    Fantastic! I went to a craft show in Wales last weekend and they use reclamed wood from barns and old furniture to make things. I got a beautiful candle holder from an old table leg :)

  • riotjane

    Bethany Helzer from riotjane said 3 years ago

    When I was selling at the DIY Street Fair in Ferndale, I had the opportunity to meet these guys and purchase one of their amazing picture frames. I love that it has the address of the house that it was constructed from attached to the back of the frame. It is a beautiful addition to my home, and a brilliant way to reuse.

  • TickleBebe

    Jacquie Hartman from TickleBebe said 3 years ago

    love this! I live about 30 minutes from Detroit...so sad to drive through there...now there's some hope!

  • LivingVintage

    LivingVintage from LivingVintage said 3 years ago

    Wonderful story!

  • LunasaDesigns

    Rebekah Timlin Meddles from LunasaDesigns said 3 years ago

    I'm a Detroit native... I don't live there now, but there used to be a joke that Detroit was the biggest small town in America. There were so few people actually living in Downtown Detroit that we all knew each other - just like living in a small town. I was amazed at the growth of the city last time I went back for a visit... This story is great - one thing I always lamented was the waste - all of those empty homes! Now if we can start a project to fix up some of those abandoned home for the homeless, Detroit will be even MORE rocking. :)

  • HabitNation

    Rebecca and Daniel from HabitNation said 3 years ago Featured

    As a life-long resident of Michigan, I find this story absolutely heart warming and fascinating. Many times I have travelled through the area and see the broken windows, dilapidated porches, skeletal frames, and grafitti. It is a very emotional sight and I always being to think about what life "used" to be in Detroit when it was quite the happier and safer place. I am so proud to hear of some of our state's citizens working hard to make a change and give hope and a new life to a once vibrant city. The toys are amazing, and I love that a local restaurant is using reclaimed wood as furnishings. A very special way to keep history alive.

  • wayfaringmagnolia

    Amanda Esch from WayfaringMagnolia said 3 years ago

    Love to see my home state represented on Etsy. Thank you for doing this story. Long live Detroit!

  • LittleWrenPottery

    Victoria Baker from LittleWrenPottery said 3 years ago

    Great project, its nice to see residents really reclaiming their own streets!

  • slacey152

    Stacy from HappiestCrafts said 3 years ago

    What a wonderful story! Reclaim, Reuse with a true meaing behind it!! Way to go!! Love it!

  • OliveSpoonStudio

    Michael and Erin Waite from OliveSpoonStudio said 3 years ago

    What a wonderful thing that is happening there!

  • Celticcatphotos

    Celtic Cat Photos Mary Catherine Campbell from Celticcatphotos said 3 years ago

    I grew up in Detroit. So glad to hear about this awesome project!

  • etcher101

    etcher101 from EtchStitchandBurn said 3 years ago

    As a native Michigander...this story really makes me happy! I left about 8 years ago as the economic downturn was beginning to take place but my family remains there to this day. It's been a heartbreak for me to hear of the horrible stories of poverty and foreclosure that has been a plague on Michigan ever since. Thank you for helping to bring Detroit back!!!

  • FORGETheFUTURE

    FORGETheFUTURE from FORGETheFUTURE said 3 years ago

    A fantastic job and very helpful. I very envy you ... I would like to be there to help you!

  • maggiesraggedyinn

    Mary Robertson from MaggiesInn said 3 years ago

    This makes me smile and it is an example that so many of us could use. Very interesting article! Thanks!

  • creativeclassics

    creativeclassics from creativeclassics said 3 years ago

    This sounds absolutely amazing, my brother is training to be a carpenter at the moment and I'm sure that even he isn't aware of just how much stuff can be made out of wood. I'm sure most people would think old wood from houses would be too "worn" to be of any use, but it's actually far more durable than we give it credit for. I'd love to see this kind of thing make it over to the UK!

  • mienkintoshfairie

    Aja' from mienkintoshfairie said 3 years ago

    I'm from Detroit, and I do hope that this project brings life back into the city. I moved away 14 years ago and never looked back. Now if we could only improve the schools and job market, Detroit could have a fighting chance! Lovely article, a positive ^_^

  • LeasaMarie

    Leasa from LeasaDesigns said 3 years ago

    Great way to use old wood- how exciting - endless ideas~

  • irinisklavounou

    irini from IrinisWorld said 3 years ago

    When we built The Handmade Hotel- http://tothegarden.org/wp/about-us -a friend offered to sell me a pile of old wood that had been salvaged from earthquake damaged houses. It looked about fit for burning but that wood cleaned up a dream and gave so much character to the finished building. I've still got a fair pile of it i am eyeing up for various projects. Old broken concrete is also useful and can be transformed into paving mosaic with acid stains.....

  • valeriephoto

    Valerie from valeriestitchery said 3 years ago

    As someone born and raised in Michigan, it breaks my heart to see Detroit falling on hard times. I also have an especial love for Victorian homes, as so many abandoned ones in Detroit are, and I want to see them put to good use. This is a wonderful story. It warms my heart. Good job guys. Thanks for all you're doing to help the city, and the environment. Thank you for posting this.

  • gertieloo88

    Mary from WoodenHeartButtons said 3 years ago Featured

    I count Detroit as one of my favorite cities. It has a slightly haunted beauty that speaks of a bygone era of booming industry and affluence. However, so much needs to be done to revitalize this great city. As someone who uses reclaimed wood in my craft, I know the hidden value of cast off materials and love these kinds of initiatives. All the best to those individuals who are trying to make a difference.

  • DeEscalaArt

    BEATRIZ DE ESCALA from DeEscalaArt said 3 years ago

    Great job and is enviromentally friendly...love it.

  • irinisklavounou

    irini from IrinisWorld said 3 years ago

    I just checked out the 'end grain cutting boards'....Terrific!!

  • TheHickoryTree

    Linda from TheHickoryTree said 3 years ago

    What a great article. Keep up the good work guys. .What a great way to bring about change in a once great city.

  • AddieLou

    Relina Chamberlin from AddieLou said 3 years ago

    So awesome! I'm from Detroit also, now residing in Georgia. It's so sad that such beautiful unique structures are just going to waste, being burned up or being occupied by crackheads. It's so nice that something good is being done with at least a fraction of it. Keep up the good work!

  • kgpaintings

    Kirsten Gilmore from PaintingsByKEGilmore said 3 years ago

    This is an inspiring article. Thank you for sharing the process with us. :)

  • cottonbirddesigns

    Angela Cotton from CottonBirdDesigns said 3 years ago

    Great article!

  • IronGuerrilla

    Patrick Gallagher from IronGuerrilla said 3 years ago

    This is seriously badass. Seems like there is so much opportunity in Detroit and other parts of the midwest impacted by a crap economy for people willing to get creative and work hard. Well done.

  • ZorroPlateado

    Carole from ZorroPlateado said 3 years ago

    Enjoyed the article. I would love to see this in other cities too.

  • DanasaurDesigns

    Dana Lauren from DanasaurDesigns said 3 years ago

    What you do is amazing! Can I come work for you?

  • CafePrimrose

    Amanda Gynther from CafePrimrose said 3 years ago

    Fabulous! I would LOVE a guitar like that myself!

  • recycledwares

    Nerrissa W from RecycledWares said 3 years ago

    Thanks for making a difference in Detroit. I am originally from Southern Michigan and when I visited Detroit, it was so sad to see all the abandoned buildings and houses. I'm glad the materials are being put to good use and more people are back to work.

  • lauraprentice

    Laura Wennstrom from laurawennstrom said 3 years ago

    Great story! It reminds me a lot of Urban Homeworks in Minneapolis, MN http://www.urbanhomeworks.org/ or the work of Theaster Gates in Chicago.

  • peshka

    Peshka from Peshka said 3 years ago

    This is Wonderful!

  • sbanghart

    Sheena Lewis from BeautifulAgainBridal said 3 years ago

    As a Michigander it is great to see this... I feel like our state is really floundering and anything positive that can come from that is a flower in the snow.

  • guext65

    JW Lin from JWPersonalShop said 3 years ago

    Great

  • beadloverskorner

    Gari Anne from beadloverskorner said 3 years ago

    What a terrific article, thank you so much for sharing this with all of us!

  • VintageLoot

    Jennifer Johnson from VintageLoot said 3 years ago

    Love this. Maybe more of this will start to take shape in other cities!

  • klb00e

    Mother Lark from MotherLark said 3 years ago

    so inspiring. absolutely wonderful!

  • sandrostumpo

    Sandro Stumpo from GalleryDiModa said 3 years ago

    THIS APPROACH SHOULD BE COMMON PRACTICE. GREAT STORY!

  • HandiworkinGirls

    HandiworkinGirls from HandiworkinGirls said 3 years ago

    Fascinating concept! We enjoy finding that perfect piece at thrift shops or the Habitat for Humanity ReStore, but reclaiming houses themselves takes it to a whole new level. I do hope that this will become a part of more communities!

  • hasincla

    hasincla from travelwanderings said 3 years ago Featured

    Detroit, you've got heart! I am impressed not only with your ingenuity, but the overwhelming success of this project. This seems to be bringing people in the city together and building it into something that lives in people's hearts, not just on a map. Well done! I'm looking forward to hearing more.

  • tomsgrossmami

    Tom's Grossmami from tomsgrossmami said 3 years ago

    Love this!

  • andreamwl

    Andrea Lawson from MaeWarrenDesigns said 3 years ago

    Very cool ideas here! Here in my town we also take pride in re-using building materials for all kinds of projects. :)

  • ThreeBarDGifts

    Monica from ThreeBarDGifts said 3 years ago

    This is a wonderful story! So good to hear that these old buildings will be given a new life! Congrats to all involved in the project!

  • ColourscapePrints

    Kelly and Kelly from ColourscapeStudios said 3 years ago

    What a brilliant idea! We love Detroit, and it's saddened us watching the decline there, but we're always so inspired when we see things like this!

  • Iammie

    iammie from iammie said 3 years ago

    Interesting!

  • TheNoveltyShop

    TheNoveltyShop from TheNoveltyShop said 3 years ago

    I hate to be a pessimist, but I really hope the wood is tested for harmful, chemical residues before using them in children's toys, cutting boards & the like. Derelict buildings are notorious for attracting nasty things like meth labs.

  • lovelyfeverboutique

    Jessica from LovelyFever said 3 years ago

    I think that what Reclaim Detroit is doing is very resourceful and creative, and the weathered wood looks absolutely beautiful. Creating jobs is a high priority for any city right now and they seem to be on the right track to doing so.

  • lmouer

    Lynsey from lmouer said 3 years ago

    This was such a profound and beautiful post. My family is from Michigan, so I appreciate the efforts you are making to improve Detroit. There is so much history there that needs to be remembered and you have a found a great way to remember Detroit while moving forward to improve the city.

  • accentonvintage

    accentonvintage from accentonvintage said 3 years ago

    Awesome project! Good work!

  • dizhasneatstuff

    deb fearon from dizhasneatstuff said 3 years ago

    I'm using reclaimed lumber to rebuild my home and build all my outbuildings. I' always hope it will become a more widespread practice. It's also the first thing I notice when driving past a derelict building, "look at all that usable material!" Between the incredible community gardens and recycled building material programs, I'm thinking of moving to Detroit!

  • CheekyVintageCloset

    cheeky vintage closet from CheekyVintageCloset said 3 years ago

    So inspiring, wonderful read. Congrats to all.

  • Pixie2428

    Doris C. from SewBeautifulbyDC said 3 years ago

    That is a wonderful idea. Keep up the great work ! Thank you for sharing your story with us.

  • zakarihonsen

    Zachary Smith-Johnson from FireflowerStudios said 3 years ago

    reclaimed and salvage materials always start with such great character i love the look on peoples face when they find out that the wine tool in their hand is made from an old Mercedes( they use amazing steel)

  • butikonline83

    Hendri . from butikonline83 said 3 years ago

    Nice art works! Congrats!

  • tresameyerdesigns

    Tresa Meyer Clark from MeyerClarkCreative said 3 years ago

    There are so many wonderful people with amazing character in Detroit. Thanks for sharing this story. Detroit has a lot of great places and people who want to do good for the community. We salute you and your service to the people.

  • gotowrist

    Camel Lee from gotowrist said 3 years ago

    Great! Thanks for sharing your wonderful story.

  • MagpieQuilts

    Ann from MagpieQuilts said 3 years ago

    Thanks for sharing such an inspiring story! Our world needs more projects like this!

  • beachbabyblues

    Susan Wagner from beachbabyblues said 3 years ago

    Oh my !! You are LIVING THE DREAM !!!

  • MahoganyWayMama

    Darcel Harmon from TheMahoganyWay said 3 years ago

    This is a great thing to be doing. Helps out the entire community.

  • paperroses352

    marylin kaufman from Seconchancesart said 3 years ago

    hi, welcome to my world reclaimed wood is a precious thing of our company, we do a lot of reclaimed wood, why you ask, because people don't want to throw it away, burn it or put in land fills it take forever for wood to compose, thats a lot of the reasons. I have a very special reason, we use it to make clocks, reclaimed wood make wonderful clocks and that only one of the things we make, but toys and shelves or bookcases are the ideal project for our company to take on. We accept wood from people , rather then have it just thrown away, So if you want to get ride of woodlet us know. papaerroses352@gmail see if we can unload it for you. Just keep bying what we make. your all great thank you veery much. The team.. Keeps us going..ok

  • EnterpriseAmericana

    Enterprise Americana from EnterpriseAmericana said 3 years ago

    WHAT AN EXCITING ARTICLE!!! 90% of my business is working with reclaimed materials. For a long time I've thought that dismantling old homes and salvaging the materials for use and sale in struggling communities would be a fantastic component to local economic recovery. How wonderful to read about people actually doing it.

  • slathered

    Sharon Moores from slathered said 3 years ago

    Detroit never even crossed my mind as an interesting city until I started hearing about all the ways its citizens were reclaiming it. So resourceful! I've been taking advantage of some of their ingenuity by buying some of their reclaimed product -- a couple of Etsy sellers offer "Detroit agate," beautiful cabochons made out of the layers of paint scraped off the equipment at automobile painting plants. Go seek them out!

  • ameliahughes3

    amelia hughes said 3 years ago

    So i seen that this site has great rateings with people ordering from it. With that being said i had ordered a ear to nose ring on December 6th. Today is Christmas and i just checked my order. it STILL has not been sent out yet. its been 20 days. i set up a claim and wrote and email asking what is taking so long, and still no answer. Im starting to think that this site is actually a scam, because i havent heard for anyone or recieved my product. There's something seriously wrong with that. So if anyone else is debating whether or not to order from here, mu suggestion is don't.

  • Macexcel

    John Schultz from JohnsVintageSigns said 3 years ago

    We would love to use Detroit's reclaimed wood. Can you even imagine the history? It will give our products even more meaning and stories to share.

  • barrylinder

    Barry Linder from BarrysToys said 3 years ago

    Man what I would give to be in Detroit and know you guys. I make my toys out of reclaimed wood and to have houses at my disposal, Wow. I live in co. Cork Ireland so it would be impossible, what a huge idea you are living. I do not have to wish you good luck because you guys are winners and can go no where but up. Thank you for a fabulous story. Barry

  • opendoorstudio

    Martha Layton Smith from opendoorstudio said 3 years ago

    I love the idea of reclaiming and repurposing. I love keeping things out of our landfills! always on the lookout for reclaimed lumber for various projects i have in my head! thank you for sharing and kudos to the folks in detroit for carefully removing the lumber and things from old unloved homes, so that we can all give them new life!

  • kvolle62

    Kevin Volle from ChloesMosaics said 3 years ago

    Bravo! Great idea!

  • PaulaArt

    paula from PaulaArt said 3 years ago

    right on! great post

  • ellabellamay

    Ursula Goetz from ellabellamay said 3 years ago

    Wonderful post! Thank you for sharing this story. What an amazing, creative way to repurpose perfectly good wood, and make it into something so beautiful and useful besides!

  • 58pennylane

    Penny Burke from PennyLaneTreasures said 3 years ago

    This is a great story. I too love old wood. I make my husband nuts, because if I see a good piece of wood, even in the garbage or on the side of the road, I make him stop and help me get it. I know I'll be able to find some use for it. SOMEDAY!

  • couponcountrystyle

    couponcountrystyle from ACountryStyleLife said 3 years ago

    Living in the outskirts of Portland, OR I am no stranger to seeing those who want to re purpose and invent new uses for our historic buildings, old barns, and community centers. By hearing fresh stories about those who do the same in other regions, it gives me fresh inspiration to help save some of our countries history by taking a more active role in our property, the properties in my small town (800 strong!), and also the nearby metro area of Portland. Thank you for bringing a fresh reminder to me that life really is about stopping to smell the roses and stepping outside of the box.

  • shabbyone

    Anita Spero from AnitaSperoDesign said 3 years ago

    Our future relies on this kind of story. We all hear the stories of heaping landfills and dirty rivers. I am 45 years old. For me I will always see heaping landfills. But for my grandchildren, their children and so on I KNOW that with people like this they will have such a beautiful earth to enjoy. Their homes will be filled with "vintage" and "antique" pieces made from wonderful people like Jeremy Haines. They will be pieces that truly have stories like this one. What a wonderful and positive way to look at life. If we do our part...business and personal, to reuse re-purpose and recycle how can the outcome be anything less than beautiful.

  • nativestrandsjewelry

    Rachel from PeppersJewelry said 3 years ago

    I like the concept behind all of this. Thanks!

  • RECCIEatETSY

    Clarice Booth from RECCIEatETSY said 3 years ago

    Our thoughts become our dreams, Our dreams become our passions, Our passions become our visions, and our visions become our reality. May your visions become your reality Detroit. Blessings,

  • Wholesaletoys

    Wholesale Toys said 1 year ago

    Great post,thanks for sharing.

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