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Out of the Blue: The Story of Indigo

Apr 12, 2013

by Linzee McCray

Etsy.com handmade and vintage goods

I’d venture to say there’s no color that conjures iconic clothing, honor, and emotion quite like blue — think blue jeans, true blue, and feeling blue. For centuries, the color has been significant to cultures around the world, and for most of that time there was only one way to produce rich, blue fabrics: with the plant-based dye indigo.

Fabric Treasury

A cake of Indian indigo.

Indigo’s centuries-long history can be traced back to 5000 BC. “It is an integral part of the dying traditions in India, which is believed to be the oldest center of indigo cultivation in the Old World,” says Anne George of Fabric Treasury. “India was a primary supplier of indigo to Europe as early as the Greco-Roman era.” Indeed, Europeans craved the rich color, and trade in indigo was so profitable that it was sometimes called Blue Gold. Colonization of African countries and India gave Europeans ready access to indigo, and armies dressed in indigo-dyed uniforms (“navy” blue) sometimes fought to protect indigo supplies and production facilities. However, with the introduction of synthetic indigo in the mid-1800s, plant-based indigo lost its importance and production and dying lessened.

Squid Whale Designs

Natural indigo tote bag.

Today, natural indigo is undergoing a revival as artisans rediscover its versatility, sustainability, and historical traditions. “I became interested in natural dyes in general after working with synthetic dyes for both cellulose and protein fibers for 10-plus years,” says Elizabeth McTear of Squid Whale Designs. “My concerns about my own safety in using the toxic synthetic dyes and mordants [a mordant helps fix color to fabric, reducing fading], as well as my growing interest in environmental impact, led me to seek out natural dyes. Indigo is a complex, living culture dye. This means one continuous dye bath, with much less waste water.”

Turning indigo cakes and powder into dye is a trial and error process, but indigo’s sustainability is one reason dyers feel it’s worth the effort. Other sustainable attributes include indigo’s ability to be produced twice yearly and grown in combination with edible plants like wheat and corn. And indigo benefits the soil by releasing nitrogen back into it. There are more than 275 varieties of plants that produce indigo.

Fabric Treasury

Fabric dyed and printed using natural indigo dye.

Because indigo has grown in many parts of the world for so many centuries, those new to dying have a myriad of traditions to explore. “Indigo fell back into tiny pockets of the world where traditional textile dying practices persisted,” notes George. “The farming and dying is a skill passed down through generations.” There are batiks and ikat from Indonesia and strip-woven kente and ashoké cloth from Ghana and Nigeria. In Japan, indigo is used for shibori, a technique of stitching, twisting, and folding fabric before dying. This is the tradition that Karen Grover of Karen Grover Designs explores in the fabrics she sells.

“You get such crisp lines with indigo, and there is the contrast of the natural fiber color with the many shades of blue that is so fresh and clean,” she says. “Indigo works well for me because the patterns created with arashi shibori are so fluid and organic — they are reminiscent of ripples on water or wood grain — and indigo ties into that nicely. There is a long, rich tradition and history surrounding indigo, and I like the connection to other cultures and other times.”

Rebecca Desnos

Shibori scarf in indigo.

While indigo’s historical, aesthetic, and environmental properties are important to Karen, she notes it also has a mysterious quality. When textiles are removed from the dye vat and mix with air, they transform.

Karen Grover Designs

An example of Karen’s dreamy dyed fabric.

“One of my earliest creative memories is of dipping folded tissue paper in Rit Dye and waiting to open it,” says Karen. “It was a moment of anticipation and expectancy and utter surprise, waiting to see how the folds and colors interacted to create a pattern. I get that same feeling when I do shibori and particularly with indigo, there is an element of magic. You witness the fabric changing from a yellow green to iridescent teal and purple and then blue. It’s mesmerizing.”

Shop Indigo on Etsy

4 Featured Comments

  • HappyEarthTea

    Niraj Lama from HappyEarthTea said 5 years ago Featured

    Inspired to hear and see the return of the Indigo. It's history in India is glorious, as pointed in the article, but at the same time tortured. Indigo during the colonial rule symbolized brutality of the colonialists when indigo farmers were executed for refusing to plant the crop. The peasants were protesting the harsh exploitative terms imposed upon them. The current use of indigo as a traditional eco-friendly dye is a nice way to exorcise some of the ghosts of the past for this wonderful plant. The featured works are lovely indeed!

  • PruAtelier

    Jeanne B from PruAtelier said 5 years ago Featured

    Great story of the history of that wonderful color blue indigo! It's wonderful and often quite surprising to learn WHAT our dyes from the natural world are made from, together with the histories of their use acquired through the ages. Now if I could only better understand the dye process to do my own dyeing, I'd be happy!

  • Itemlore

    Gina Hall from GinasTreasureTrove said 5 years ago Featured

    How neat it was to read this. My Grandfather Walter Wright worked in the indigo industry for decades, including back during WW2. Later on in life he traveled to Brazil to help one of the major indigo manufacturers troubleshoot some of the problems they were having with their dye works. I suppose its no wonder that indigo blue is one of my favourite colors.

  • lkmccray

    Linzee from lkmccray said 5 years ago Featured

    Thanks for your comments! It isn't possible to share indigo's complete and complex history in this short article, of course. Suffice it to say that it's always amazing to me that the desire for dyes and textiles changed the course of history, and not always in a pretty way. Niraj Lama's comments above about indigo's tortured past are just one example. Several people mentioned woad—a less vibrant, less colorfast blue dye derived from plants—and the only blue available to Europeans before the mid-1500s, when explorers "discovered" indigo on their travels. European woad growers convinced governments to ban the import of indigo to protect their interests. I echo Niraj Lama's generous comment about indigo's current usage exorcising some of the ghosts of the plant's past, and I admire those who are exploring its rich traditions.

108 comments

  • jessgreenleaf

    Jess Greenleaf from GREENLEAFblueberry said 5 years ago

    The histories of pigments and dyes are absolutely fascinating. There are so many stories behind each color. War, adventure, life, and death- all for another color to add to the palette or wardrobe. Would love to see more spots on other colors!

  • HappyEarthTea

    Niraj Lama from HappyEarthTea said 5 years ago Featured

    Inspired to hear and see the return of the Indigo. It's history in India is glorious, as pointed in the article, but at the same time tortured. Indigo during the colonial rule symbolized brutality of the colonialists when indigo farmers were executed for refusing to plant the crop. The peasants were protesting the harsh exploitative terms imposed upon them. The current use of indigo as a traditional eco-friendly dye is a nice way to exorcise some of the ghosts of the past for this wonderful plant. The featured works are lovely indeed!

  • MegansMenagerie

    Megan from MegansMenagerie said 5 years ago

    What a neat story behind this beautiful color! Thanks for sharing!

  • fineartbyportia

    Portia Smith from FineArtbyPortia said 5 years ago

    Love what you wrote and the visuals are lovely. Thank you! Inspired me to create in indigo. Portia

  • peacesofindigo

    Dawanna Young from peacesofindigo said 5 years ago

    So intriguing!

  • ThePattypanShop

    ThePattypanShop from ThePattypanShop said 5 years ago

    Beautiful Blues!! Thanks for sharing!!!

  • CuriousLemon

    Karine Fournier from CuriousLemon said 5 years ago

    Fascinating !

  • LivingVintage

    LivingVintage from LivingVintage said 5 years ago

    Fascinating! Thanks Linzee.

  • pinksnakejewelry

    pinksnakejewelry from pinksnakejewelry said 5 years ago

    Terrific Post!!! Beautiful Creations!!!

  • natalievetter

    Hans Holz from HansHolz said 5 years ago

    i love this color!!!

  • valeriephoto

    Valerie from valeriestitchery said 5 years ago

    Beautiful. This reminds me of my visit to an old ocher mine near Rousillon, in the Provence region of France. The whole town was made with stucco from the mine, and when you see it in the distance, all the buildings are different shades of red and pink. The mine itself looks like what I imagine it must be to visit another planet: all craters or orange and yellow.

  • mattyhandmadecrafts

    Matejka Max from NattyMatty said 5 years ago

    Incredible!

  • amysfunkyfibers

    Amy Gunderson from amysfunkyfibers said 5 years ago

    Wonderful feature! Indigo is so beautiful !

  • PruAtelier

    Jeanne B from PruAtelier said 5 years ago Featured

    Great story of the history of that wonderful color blue indigo! It's wonderful and often quite surprising to learn WHAT our dyes from the natural world are made from, together with the histories of their use acquired through the ages. Now if I could only better understand the dye process to do my own dyeing, I'd be happy!

  • gardenmis

    Priscilla from Gardenmis said 5 years ago

    Absolutely fascinating and what a rich and sometimes sad heritage indigo provides! Happy to see a revival of it's use!

  • MrsGingerandWasabi

    Marta DQ from tribomo said 5 years ago

    Great story! Thanks for sharing, honestly I didn't know all this...

  • KathrynPHaley

    Kate Haley from CopperSpineStudio said 5 years ago

    By far my most favorite color especially the shades with a good dose of purple. Thanks for the fascinating article!

  • blainedesign

    Karen Brown from blainedesign said 5 years ago

    GREAT ARTICLE! Such an elusive, sought-after color, so full of cultural and agricultural history. Wonderful, Linzee.

  • patspottery

    Pat Parker from PatsPottery said 5 years ago

    One of my favorite glazes, Indigo Blue , is also one of the most expensive to make. One of the minerals in it, is cobalt, which has gone up in price like crazy in the last few years. But I make it anyway, as It is soooo beautiful♥

  • SquidWhaleDesigns

    Elizabeth McTear from HonestAlchemyCo said 5 years ago

    I'm loving all these indigo picks. So happy to be included with such wonderful items! Thank you. :)

  • MouseTrapVintage

    Sarah Brown from MouseTrapVintage said 5 years ago

    Way to go on the feature, Beth! Indigo is magical and I'm wearing my SquidWhale bandana today!

  • thelandlockedsailor

    The Bosun and Sarita Li Johnson from TheLandlockedSailor said 5 years ago

    Loooove it! We just sold a wooden sailboat that was once called Indigo Blue. :) :)

  • FreakyPeas

    FreakyPeas from FreakyPeas said 5 years ago

    Thanks again Etsy for the awesome history lesson!

  • catchaleaf

    eva andrews from catchaleaf said 5 years ago

    A great example of what lies behind most of the materials we use today!

  • WoodlandCottage

    WoodlandCottage from WoodlandCottage said 5 years ago

    Does anyone know why blue is associated with a depressed mental state? Why do we have the "blues," and not the "grays," for instance? I've always loved the color blue--it's my favorite--so I never understood that expression. Explanations would be welcomed... (...and thank you for the lovely picks!)

  • anotherghostquilts

    Nancy from anotherghostquilts said 5 years ago

    Very interesting, Linzee. Thanks!

  • dyeing2meetU

    Idy from dyeing2meetU said 5 years ago

    Colours from natural ingredient do have a different depth... It's wonderful! Thank you!

  • seasidecloth

    seasidecloth from seasidecloth said 5 years ago

    True indigo blue is breathtaking - an all time favorite to use as an accent in designing. Adore it.

  • H88255

    H88255 from HillarysSuperfoods said 5 years ago

    Blue is my favorite color. Especially this shade of blue! So beautiful!

  • boutiquebohem

    Kim from BoutiqueBohem said 5 years ago

    A virginous color in historical religious art. And sacred to other cultures too. Maybe because it is the color of the sky, water, etc. Art historians have much info on it too. But the number of plants that can be used to dye with, didn't know that. Amazing. (Blueberries we knew of course) But I think I will research that and consider growing the easy to grow ones to use on some yarn. Thanks!!!!! A fun and happy read!

  • FabricTreasury

    Anne George from FabricTreasury said 5 years ago

    A wonderful story on indigo and so super delighted that my indigo cake and indigo dyed fabric is included too :) Thank you Linzee for my first ever feature on an Etsy Blog.

  • ikabags

    IKA PARIS from ikabags said 5 years ago

    Great color !

  • rarebeasts

    Brian McNamara from rarebeasts said 5 years ago

    Great story.

  • sterag925

    Melissa Moss Smith from sterag925 said 5 years ago

    Colors of sky and water, you gotta love it...indigo. Thanks for sharing.

  • karengroverdesigns

    Karen Grover from karengroverdesigns said 5 years ago

    Beautifully composed piece Linzee. Wonderful to see the work and hear from other indigo lovers on etsy. I appreciate you including me, thank you!

  • bukra65

    fielding from bukra65 said 5 years ago

    Enjoyed the article, just wish more coverage on indigo's cultivation here in America had been discussed. For those wanting to learn more about early indigo cultivation in Colonial North America, google Eliza Lucas Pinckney for some interesting information. She is credited by some historians as the single most influential person in introducing what was once an important cash crop for South Carolina planters.

  • auntjanecan

    Jane Priser from JanePriserArts said 5 years ago

    I love the indigo color! Very interesting article to read about the history.

  • anascrafties

    Ana Hernández from Anascrafties said 5 years ago

    Very enjoyable reading. Thanks for a superb article, that makes us know more about an already desirable dying substance.

  • cloud9originals

    Marie from cloud9originals said 5 years ago

    Thank you for the story of indigo, very informative! Great picks!!

  • sdbick24

    Sarah Bickett Mills from bluescarlettky said 5 years ago

    Love blue, blue, blue!!

  • Itemlore

    Gina Hall from GinasTreasureTrove said 5 years ago Featured

    How neat it was to read this. My Grandfather Walter Wright worked in the indigo industry for decades, including back during WW2. Later on in life he traveled to Brazil to help one of the major indigo manufacturers troubleshoot some of the problems they were having with their dye works. I suppose its no wonder that indigo blue is one of my favourite colors.

  • breadandroses2

    breadandroses2 from breadandroses2 said 5 years ago

    Indigo is irresistible and the best kind of blue. I learned quite a bit more about indigo than I knew before so thank you for this nutshell history and for featuring my bag, too, Linzee!

  • baconsquarefarm

    baconsquarefarm from baconsquarefarm said 5 years ago

    Great read thanks for the history of indigo.

  • nerdycraftgirl

    nerdycraftgirl from nerdycraftgirl said 5 years ago

    I actually did a paper for AP Chemistry on dyes, and Indigo was one of the natural dyes I cited. Another source of natural indigo is Woad, a plant native to England. The Picts, an ancient tribe from northern Scotland, used it to paint themselves blue when they went off to battle (they were so formidible that the Romans built Hadrian's wall to keep them out). Since my great-grandfather was a Scottish immigrant, it's interesting to think I may have had a blue-painted ancestor!

  • nerdycraftgirl

    nerdycraftgirl from nerdycraftgirl said 5 years ago

    Oh yeah, and, Woodlandcottage, maybe people speak of feeling "blue" because blue is a cool color and might remind people of coldness or tears. Idioms are strange, though, so it could be anything. Gray makes more sense to me, too - it reminds me of those rainclouds that Oregon is all too full of.

  • ForeverRenee

    Crystal Renee from ForeverRenee said 5 years ago

    Fascinating story! Enjoyed reading it.

  • aressa

    aressa from OriginalBridalHanger said 5 years ago

    Great post! Love the products!

  • jenstilley

    Jen Stilley from ArtfullyYoursByJen said 5 years ago

    Wow, that is so interesting! I would love to do more research on plants containing indigo. My husband and I are avid gardeners, so learning that indigo puts nitrogen back in the soil is good to know. We are always looking for new and organic ways of enriching our soil. Thanks for sharing!

  • senoritasofia

    s o p h i a from MadrinaSofia said 5 years ago

    Thanks for sharing the historical significance of this beautiful color with us! Really enjoyed this!

  • empressnorton

    empressnorton from empressnorton said 5 years ago

    I love indigo and work with it often, though I think it's important to note that natural indigo is also toxic and typically requires the use of dangerous materials such as lye. In some cultures that have traditionally used indigo, women aren't allowed to work with indigo until after they have passed menopause, due to indigo's detrimental effects on female reproductive health and teratogenic risks. It's safe once the dyeing has been completed, but anyone interested in working with indigo should be properly versed in appropriate safety measures for their own health.

  • BambuEarth

    Amber from BambuEarth said 5 years ago

    Awesome history. Love this. ♥

  • joliefemme

    Diana from joliefemme said 5 years ago

    Love the perspective!

  • fairyatheart

    Audrey Hummer from FairyAtHeart said 5 years ago

    Indigo is such an amazing color, the history that you shard is very interesting as well! Thanks for a fabulous article!

  • NorthcottWilson

    NorthcottWilson from NorthcottWilson said 5 years ago

    What a surprise to see my silk boucle yarn in the lead photo! Phyllis, great photo and I love how the yarn turned out when you dyed it with indigo.

  • robynmuller

    Robyn Muller from RobynMullerArt said 5 years ago

    Everyone is feeling a bit inky lately? Indigo seems to be on everyone's mind...or mood ;) Here 2 lovely little TLists featuring one of my Indigo paintings. https://www.etsy.com/treasury/MzE5MDg3OTR8MjcyNDI2MjY5Ng/mood-indigo https://www.etsy.com/treasury/ODYxOTcyNHwyNzI0MjY3NzE2/moody-blues

  • ButchersBroom

    Butcher's Broom from BUTCHERSBROOM said 5 years ago

    ►HELLO LINZEE, YOUR WORK IS VERY CHARMING AND YOUR RESEARCH DESERVES ATTENTION. THANKS FOR TELLING ME THIS BEAUTIFUL STORY◄ Good light, _BB_

  • billyblot

    Karen Mott Smith from Kesosun said 5 years ago

    Great post. I have been wanting to try real Indigo for a while now and am just about to attend a workshop. Lovely choices and a wonderful story, thanks. Kx

  • Villedefleurs

    Tatiana from VilleDeFleurs said 5 years ago

    This article inspired me to try so many new things ! Thanks for sharing !

  • thedelhistore

    thedelhistore from theDelhiStore said 5 years ago

    What a great write up! Vegetable indigo dye fabrics are gorgeous to look at and so soft in feel.

  • AlisaDesign

    Alisa from AlisaDesign said 5 years ago

    Awesome!

  • cyasarcan

    Canan from Zembil said 5 years ago

    I LOVE INDIGO! Amazing article, thank you!

  • hastearsofcloth

    Pam Litoun from hastearsofcloth said 5 years ago

    Thanks a terrific vibrant dye exciting to work with but don't forget Woad or in French Pastel - many dyers have turned back to this blue dye that was used in Europe before Indigo made it to our shores. It is as beautiful as reactive and you can grow it in abundance in the back yard! Toulouse was practically built on the money from pastel!

  • cb80085

    Clara Belle from ClarasHandMade said 5 years ago

    Wonderful. I really enjoyed reading this and it taught me many things!

  • loveartworks

    Kristin Love from LoveArtWorks said 5 years ago

    Awesome~!! Indigo is my Favorite Color and I make an Indigo Blue Glaze for my Pottery that is to die for, it's so Deep and Rich. I love the Color so much that I named my German Shepherd "Indigo"!! Thanks so much for the Amazingly Informative Article!!! :)

  • loveartworks

    Kristin Love from LoveArtWorks said 5 years ago

    Awesome~~!! Indigo is my Favorite Color and I make Gorgeous, Deep, Rich Indigo Glaze that I use on my Pottery and I *love* the color so much I named my German Shepherd "Indigo"!! Thank you for an Amazing Article!! :)

  • jaanatoome

    aNyA from SugarAndChaiVintage said 5 years ago

    Indigo is one of my favorite words, it even sounds nice! :)) Amazing article, thanks!

  • ThreeBarDGifts

    Monica from ThreeBarDGifts said 5 years ago

    This is a very interesting article! I absoutely love a deep blue color! Thank you for sharing!

  • lkmccray

    Linzee from lkmccray said 5 years ago Featured

    Thanks for your comments! It isn't possible to share indigo's complete and complex history in this short article, of course. Suffice it to say that it's always amazing to me that the desire for dyes and textiles changed the course of history, and not always in a pretty way. Niraj Lama's comments above about indigo's tortured past are just one example. Several people mentioned woad—a less vibrant, less colorfast blue dye derived from plants—and the only blue available to Europeans before the mid-1500s, when explorers "discovered" indigo on their travels. European woad growers convinced governments to ban the import of indigo to protect their interests. I echo Niraj Lama's generous comment about indigo's current usage exorcising some of the ghosts of the plant's past, and I admire those who are exploring its rich traditions.

  • Fullerjewelry

    Jane Fuller from Hoopsetc said 5 years ago

    Great article, great picks - loving the blue theme this morning!

  • Spinknitandlife

    Phyllis Hedrick from Spinknitandlife said 5 years ago

    I am both surprised and thrilled that my photograph of Indigo dyed yarns was featured in your blog post. I love dyeing spinning fibers and yarns with Indigo. I am happy to hear that it is undergoing a revival. The lovely undyed silk boucle yarn that was used in my Indigo dye project was purchased from NorthcottWilson's Etsy shop. Wonderful and informative blog post.

  • FabricTreasury

    Anne George from FabricTreasury said 5 years ago

    And a word about the picture of indigo cake. The picture was captured by Zachria Chungath (zac.zachria@gmail.com), my brother, patience personified. He took about an hour to set up and come up with this stunning picture.

  • mazedasastoat

    mazedasastoat from mazedasastoat said 5 years ago

    Always nice to see a feature on natural dyes. I love the way the colours are softer and they fade with age... both reasons why chemical dyes became popular!

  • harrachglass

    Carol from HarrachGlass said 5 years ago

    Interesting article about blue dyes and textiles. The blue in the picture titled, A cake of Indian indigo, is so deep and beautiful. I think I wear the color blue more than any other color.

  • richardlithgow

    Richard Lithgow from RichardLithgow said 5 years ago

    Beautiful color!

  • 118jan

    Janette from AmericanDollClothes said 5 years ago

    I love your story of how blues became blues, I learned so much from it. Thank you for sharing it with us.

  • Bostonstclair

    Emma st clair Smith from BostonStClair said 5 years ago

    great article and beautiful finds!

  • kgpaintings

    Kirsten Gilmore from PaintingsByKEGilmore said 5 years ago

    From my avatar, you can see I love this color, used in paintings. The golden acrylic paint "anthroquinone blue" can approximate the hue.

  • leeannasjewerybox

    Leeanna from LeeannasJewelryBox said 5 years ago

    That was such a well written article. I loved learning about indigo. Thank you.

  • CrystalNeroArt

    Crystal Nero from CrystalNeroArt said 5 years ago

    Love this story, was very interesting.. thanks..

  • ESTATENOW

    VINTAGE NOW from ESTATENOW said 5 years ago

    This is ONE of my Favorite color..

  • Challand

    Sharon Challand from Challand said 5 years ago

    Interesting article and a great color!

  • metalicious

    Stephanie Maslow Blackman from metalicious said 5 years ago

    My favorite color, the color of sapphires! Cool to read about the history, thanks for the article!

  • KittyCatsCupboard

    Diane from KittyCatsCupboard said 5 years ago

    I love the idea of using natural dyes. Great article.

  • paramountvintage

    kristin from blackmoonsky said 5 years ago

    as a vintage seller, indigo has always held a special place in my heart. Glad to see it getting used so much throughout etsy.

  • thebuttonbird

    Katie Cusack from TheButtonBird said 5 years ago

    Fascinating!

  • krayexclusive

    RAY from KRAYExclusive said 5 years ago

    I totally forgot about the history of indigo! Thank you for refreshing my memory. I am new to this community, I am already loving its culture! Thank you again!

  • skyvalleyjewelry

    Jennifer from skyvalleyjewelry said 5 years ago

    Great story ! I have always loved true indigo blue.

  • glitterandstones

    glitterandstones from glitterandstones said 5 years ago

    Fascinating story. Thanks:)

  • dawnMaeR

    dawna rubihid from lepetitchatrobin said 5 years ago

    Love that color! oh la la!

  • dawnMaeR

    dawna rubihid from lepetitchatrobin said 5 years ago

    love it!

  • FranceGallery

    France Gallery from FranceGallery said 5 years ago

    Interesting!!

  • losethecurse

    Sara from HiraganaAmericana said 5 years ago

    This is a great introduction to the wonder that is indigo. It is so versatile and has such a rich historical significance. Thanks for sharing!

  • Cufflinked

    Cufflinked from Cufflinked said 5 years ago

    Who Knew? Great story. Thanks

  • poplovedesigns

    Andrea Hughes from PopLoveHers said 5 years ago

    We looked into indigo dyeing a while back and were really keen on the idea considering the benefits... Rich, vibrant colors, an equally rich and vibrant history, eco properties, but... At the end of the day, it's a rather smelly process and with our tiny urban studio, we just don't have the space to do it. I guess sometimes it pays to live in the 'burbs

  • SquidWhaleDesigns

    Elizabeth McTear from HonestAlchemyCo said 5 years ago

    @Andrea Hughes - I keep 3 indigo vats in my tiny art studio in the city, in large steel pots. It does smell, but if you keep it covered (as recommended to reduce the dye's exposure to oxygen) it keeps the smell down.

  • artphotographyprints

    Matthew Palmer from ArtPhotographyPrints said 5 years ago

    So easy to take color for granted, especially with them there fancy computers!

  • nativestrandsjewelry

    Rachel from PeppersJewelry said 5 years ago

    Thanks for the article on indigo. The fabrics you shared that are dyed in indigo are beautiful!

  • elisaavraam

    Elsa A from CloudPearls said 5 years ago

    I love this color!

  • honeycombstudio

    Courtney Hamill from honeycombstudio said 5 years ago

    Super interesting to read about the history of such a beautiful color. This will definitely make me look at many things in my closet differently.

  • sugoi07

    Genevieve Atkins from sugoi07 said 5 years ago

    It's only in the last decade that I've come to appreciate indigo. Japanese culture have used it in their weaving, kasuri, for centuries, or longer. I have collected many wonderful samples, woven on back strap looms. Each piece appears to show a slightly different blue to the next. Thanks for the article, Linzee.

  • rickytalmage

    Ricky Talmage from PeysterStreet said 5 years ago

    My favorite color! I have to make a conscious effort to not use too much of the colors I love in my designs. With stones, Lapis is my all time favorite!

  • NirvanaRoad

    Lisa from NirvanaRoad said 5 years ago

    Indigo.... love, love it!

  • leahleaf

    Leah Moses from Yumyo said 5 years ago

    years ago I played with silk for a while. There's nothing quite like being elbow deep in an indigo vat. I highly recommend trying it!

  • SteampunkRevolution

    Shawnzi from TimeEnoughAtLast said 5 years ago

    Such a pretty color. compliments everything!

  • EirkVanWert

    Erik Van Wert from ErikVanWert said 5 years ago

    I teach indigo dyeing in Harlem, NY. We have an upcoming workshop in early June at the Children's Art Carnival. The quilters in the area just LOVE it!

  • xutian1

    ya mo from 2013color said 5 years ago

    Beautiful Blues!! Thanks for sharing!!!

  • devans00

    devans00 said 5 years ago

    I love the chunk of indigo. Such a rich blue.

  • maikahandworks

    Maika from MaikaHandworks said 3 years ago

    I am an Indigo lover. Thank you for sharing the history of Indigo!

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