Shop Etsy

History Lesson: The Art of Pyrography

Feb 28, 2013

by Jeni Sandberg

Etsy.com handmade and vintage goods

Jeni Sandberg is a dealer, appraiser and consultant in 20th century design. She has worked in museums, was a Senior Specialist at Christie’s, and also appears on WGBH’s Antiques Roadshow. She writes about fun objects on her blog. In this series, she will explore the history of decorative objects. Today’s subject: the delicate and beautiful wood-burning technique that is pyrography.

Practiced for centuries all over the world, pyrography — the art of burning designs into wood — enjoyed a surge in popularity during the late 19th century, particularly in the United States and Australia. Pyrography literally means “fire writing,” an apt name for the branding process. Sometimes called pokerwork, this technique had a broad appeal and is still practiced today.

SanDiegoVintage

Pyrography box with cherries, ca. 1900.

At its simplest, all that was needed for pyrography was a pointed metal tool, a heat source and wood. A pen-like nib was heated, then pushed into the wood surface. The wood was burned and incised, then sometimes stained, painted or varnished to enhance the design. This burning technique could be executed on leather, velvet, gourds and even glass, although finely grained woods, such as basswood, holly or sycamore, were commonly used.

kajeVintage

Pyrography art hand mirror.

Artists such as Robert Ball Hughes and J. William Fosdick gained some acclaim for their pyrographic works during the second half of the 19th century, but the greater part of work in this medium was done by women in the home. Books and magazines of the time urged women to beautify their homes through handiwork — china painting, embroidery, beadwork and many other crafts.  Pyrography was just one of Three Hundred Things a Bright Girl Can Do (by Lilla Elizabeth Kelley, 1903), which delineated the many projects that could be undertaken at home.

From Fancy Work For Pleasure and Profit (Addie E. Heron, first published in 1894), Library of Congress.

Pyrography kits were sold through various mail-order sources including the Sears catalog and advertisements in ladies’ magazines. These kits generally included tools, wood blanks and patterns, though designs could be taken from magazines, prints or the creator’s own imagination. Reused scraps of wood from crates and cigar boxes were sometimes used for small works.

Wood burning was also featured in Fancy Work For Pleasure and Profit (Addie E. Heron, first published in 1894), which encouraged women to create decorative works for their own homes, as well as making work for sale to earn additional income for their family. Pyrography required relatively few tools and was called “a delightful and profitable pastime for long winter evenings.”

86home

Art Nouveau pyrography table, ca. 1900.

Unsurprisingly, many of the pieces created in the years around 1900 were in the Art Nouveau style.  Generally characterized by flowing, sinuous lines and natural motifs, pyrography from this period was often decorated with flowers such as poppies and poinsettias, leaves, vines, fruit and beautiful women as depicted by Charles Dana Gibson and Alphonse Mucha.

Small, manageable pyrography projects were common, with glove and handkerchief boxes, frames and wall plaques seen most frequently today. More ambitious projects were executed as well, including large-scale furniture — hanging cabinets, wardrobes, chairs and tip-top tables were all burned with intricate designs.

obscurio

Folk art pyrography frame with skull and crossbones.

Pyrography grew so popular in the years around 1900 that the Flemish Art Co. of Brooklyn began producing it commercially, and “Flemish Art” became almost synonymous with the burned decoration.  The company manufactured finished pyrographic works that were mainly handmade (often by their female employees), as well as kits with wood blanks and tools. Some commercial pieces were also made by pressing a heated, engraved metal plate into wood — these often have more intricate designs, but lack the subtle variety of hand work.

tricianewell

Modern pyrography by artist Tricia Newell.

Pyrography is still a popular means of decorating wood today, one that many Etsy artists use. Aided by electrically heated tools, artists explore numerous and diverse styles in their work.

Shop Pyrography on Etsy | Pyrography and Wooden Spoons

Vintage 1900s Pyrography Wood Burned Cherries Heart Shaped Keepsake Memento Sweetheart Box
Vintage 1900s Pyrography Wood Burned Cherries Heart Shaped Keepsake Memento Sweetheart Box
Sold
Vintage Pyrography Art Hand Mirror Poppy Beveled Glass Burned Wood Flemish Art
Vintage Pyrography Art Hand Mirror Poppy Beveled Glass Burned Wood Flemish Art
Sold
Antique Wood Table / 1900s Pyrography Table / Art Nouveau
Antique Wood Table / 1900s Pyrography Table / Art Nouveau
Sold
Fancy Work for Pleasure and Profit Book 1905
Fancy Work for Pleasure and Profit Book 1905
Sold
woodburn, pyrography art Trio of drooping blooms
woodburn, pyrography art Trio of drooping blooms
Sold
Vintage Wooden Pyrography Bowl 1906
Vintage Wooden Pyrography Bowl 1906
Sold

2 Featured Comments

  • OhMyAmpersand

    Cheryl from FeudeJoieCo said 4 years ago Featured

    Pyrography is a fantastic creative outlet. It is very satisfying and therapeutic. It tests patience when precision and clean lines are priority. It's permanence is daunting. If mistakes can be sanded out or fudged a little, great. If not, the piece is put in a 'reject pile'. I love how I can control the heat on different types of wood, how cedar smells different from maple or birch. The addition of colour and/or collected vintage beads and cabs just makes it all the more fun. I can't wait to jump back into it this summer when I have a real studio to work in.

  • gertieloo88

    Mary from WoodenHeartButtons said 4 years ago Featured

    I love how this post has brought out some of my favorite pyrographers on Etsy! I use this technique in many of my designs and so appreciate the countless hours required to execute a highly representational piece like the ones shown here. It truly is one of those techniques that takes an hour to learn and a lifetime to master. Thanks for the terrific blog.

105 comments

  • MegansMenagerie

    Megan from MegansMenagerie said 4 years ago

    I love the art of pyrography! It's so unique and I have many of my own pieces I have made in my life displayed throughout my home. It's so much fun and I absoutely love the smell of the wood burning while working on a piece. There's nothing else like it :)

  • ArtDecoDame

    Desiree from ArtDecoDame said 4 years ago

    Pyrography is so beautiful!The smell of burning would is wonderful.I have some friends that are very talented in this department.I love the picks for this article.Just gorgeous!

  • mattyhandmadecrafts

    Matejka Max from NattyMatty said 4 years ago

    Magnificent!

  • Aristocrafts

    Aristocrafts from Aristocrafts said 4 years ago

    This is exquisite! I've always admired carved and Art Nouveau decorated boxes, and I'm so greatful for finding out now about this unique process as I can better understand the history if these precious pieces. I'm really thinking about purchasing a box for my storing hankies :)!

  • LivingVintage

    LivingVintage from LivingVintage said 4 years ago

    Beautiful and interesting!

  • FergusonsJewelry

    Thomas and Jo Ferguson from FergusonsFineJewelry said 4 years ago

    So gorgeous and such talent that went into every piece! I always love getting to learn new things here on etsy and appreciate the time and effort always put in to each blog post!

  • GoldenDaysAntiques

    Nancy from GoldenDaysAntiques said 4 years ago

    I've never met a piece of pyrography that I didn't love!

  • VeronicaRStudio

    Veronica from VeronicaRussekJoyas said 4 years ago

    This is really interesting... Thanks for showcasing this great art!

  • amysfunkyfibers

    Amy Gunderson from amysfunkyfibers said 4 years ago

    Beautiful!

  • StillVintage

    StillVintage from StillVintage said 4 years ago

    This article is really interesting. The picks are wonderful

  • CharmingShopLove

    Marissa Howes from CharmingShopLove said 4 years ago

    Wow it's so interesting to see how other people create beautiful things. This style has always fascinated me.

  • tricianewell

    Tricia Newell from tricianewell said 4 years ago

    Woah! I've had more views in my shop in the last hour than I usually get all day, so thank you for the mention!

  • mazedasastoat

    mazedasastoat from mazedasastoat said 4 years ago

    Love pyrography, although as a purist I tend to think using electrical tools is cheating! I'm always pleased if I manage to complete a project without setting off the smoke alarm! :-)

  • kgpaintings

    Kirsten Gilmore from PaintingsByKEGilmore said 4 years ago

    I'm tempted to try pyrography on some of the wood panels I use for painting, then layer that with glazes of acrylic. Congrats to all featured on the article. "Trio of Drooping Blooms" is my favorite listing mentioned above.

  • auntjanecan

    Jane Priser from JanePriserArts said 4 years ago

    This is a very interesting read of history of pyrography. I had no idea!

  • MinaMinette

    Jan Penn from MinaMinette said 4 years ago

    Thank you for informing me about this unique art form. The examples are beautiful and I love that Etsy artists today are helping to keep it alive!

  • EdelweissPost

    Patrick from EdelweissPost said 4 years ago

    We did a lot of very primitive pyrography when I was in Scouting... I never knew it had a name! On a related note, the kids in my troop who loved to play with the fires we built were called "pyros".

  • MissHildebrandt

    Miss Hildebrandt from MissHildebrandt said 4 years ago

    O h look at that piece, the drooping blooms! AMAZING!

  • knottysis

    Jennifer and Carolyn Boucher from KnottySis said 4 years ago

    Our mother used to do pyrography when we were little and now we've taken it up. I have to agree with earlier posters - the smell when you're burning is wonderful. I love art history and reading where it all started and the different styles are very interesting. Great article and congrats to the featured shops! There is some amazing work here on Etsy!

  • GisieArt

    Giselle from MyArtAndFashion said 4 years ago

    I haven't worked on pyrography but I have a friend who does, it's amazing.

  • OhMyAmpersand

    Cheryl from FeudeJoieCo said 4 years ago Featured

    Pyrography is a fantastic creative outlet. It is very satisfying and therapeutic. It tests patience when precision and clean lines are priority. It's permanence is daunting. If mistakes can be sanded out or fudged a little, great. If not, the piece is put in a 'reject pile'. I love how I can control the heat on different types of wood, how cedar smells different from maple or birch. The addition of colour and/or collected vintage beads and cabs just makes it all the more fun. I can't wait to jump back into it this summer when I have a real studio to work in.

  • TreadleLady

    Donna Kohler from TreadleLady said 4 years ago

    Very interesting history. I've seen very crude examples from simple kits but didn't realize there were so many beautiful pieces. In a skilled hand something beautiful can be created.

  • ThreeBarDGifts

    Monica from ThreeBarDGifts said 4 years ago

    I really enjoyed this article! Interesting to read about the history of pyrography. Stop by my shop to see the bookmarks I have wood burned!

  • KMalinka

    Natalia from KMalinkaVintage said 4 years ago

    Great article and very interesting history!

  • Niderart

    Nider from Niderart said 4 years ago

    Interesting article. The wooden plate is amazing!

  • MamasHouse

    Sharon K. Shubert from GrayWolfGallery said 4 years ago

    I'm so happy to see pyrography featured here! I've been working in this medium since 1978 and love using my art designs for the pieces. My biggest pieces are furniture I use in every room in my home. My pride and joy is a 6-foot long dining room table with a matching bench. I woodburned folk art scenes down the length of each side of the table. It took about 250 hours to complete. Thanks for sharing pyrography!

  • klb00e

    Mother Lark from MotherLark said 4 years ago

    love, love, love this article. Wonderful info!

  • PrayerNotes

    Prayer Notes by Cynthia from PrayerNotes said 4 years ago

    Love the heart-shaped wooden box! Beautiful work!

  • gertieloo88

    Mary from WoodenHeartButtons said 4 years ago Featured

    I love how this post has brought out some of my favorite pyrographers on Etsy! I use this technique in many of my designs and so appreciate the countless hours required to execute a highly representational piece like the ones shown here. It truly is one of those techniques that takes an hour to learn and a lifetime to master. Thanks for the terrific blog.

  • RetroRevivalBoutique

    RetroRevivalBoutique from RetroRevivalBoutique said 4 years ago

    Beautiful examples of a beautiful craft! :)

  • valeriephoto

    Valerie from valeriestitchery said 4 years ago

    When this is done well, it's just incredible. The bowl is especially gorgeous.

  • janeeroberti

    Jane E Roberti from janeeroberti said 4 years ago

    Love it! How. Did you know I just bought a wood burning pen? Cant wait to start experimenting ......

  • richardlithgow

    Richard Lithgow from RichardLithgow said 4 years ago

    Those bowls are beautiful.

  • accentonvintage

    accentonvintage from accentonvintage said 4 years ago

    Interesting article! Thanks for sharing!

  • irinisklavounou

    irini from IrinisWorld said 4 years ago

    Many years ago when leather was my medium i had a brief affair with a pyrograph and the effect along with the colors was very satisfying but however, the smell was awful, and so i settled for embossing. But i still have that pyrograph somewhere and now that i am messing around with wood..... Thanks for the inspiration.

  • JRAGourdArt

    Jenn Avery from JRAGourdArt said 4 years ago

    Great article! It is nice to see this old and much forgotten art given some attention! Love that "fancy work" pen outfit!

  • FranceGallery

    France Gallery from FranceGallery said 4 years ago

    Very interesting article and some beautiful work!

  • thedelhistore

    thedelhistore from theDelhiStore said 4 years ago

    I didn't know the term for this craft till i read this informative post. I actually tried and made a pendant for my daughter in a craft exhibition using this technique. My daughter loved the pendant.

  • StudioBotanica

    Cristy Beck from StudioBotanica said 4 years ago

    I got a tool to do this before Christmas but haven't played with it very much. I might get it out this afternoon :) Thanks for the awesome article!

  • SamSammie

    Sam from SamieSam said 4 years ago

    Thanks for the 411 Jeni. Love this craft medium! Fascinating.

  • ireneritcher

    I Ritcher from ATouchofWoodstock said 4 years ago

    Great article. The wood burning tool reminds me a lot of a pysanka tool, but then, I use a pencil with a pin... Ha. All of the included photos are lovely works of art.

  • susanvandermolen

    Susan Vander Molen said 4 years ago

    I have the most wonderful piece. It's been in my husband's family for over a 100 years. It's a piano bench with designs on the legs and the top which has the family crest! It's the best I've seen!

  • Ellareki

    Ellareki from Ellareki said 4 years ago

    I loved this article - just the right amount of information to get me completely inspired. Thank you :)

  • beadeddragons

    Brittany from beadeddragons said 4 years ago

    Interesting article. All the pieces pictured are beautiful.

  • ibleedheART

    Ashley Reagan from ibleedheART said 4 years ago

    I will be writing about my favorite pyrography artist soon on my blog! If you get the chance, google Julie Bender! She's amazing!! And wonderful to talk with if you ever get the chance!

  • gaiadesignstudios

    gaiadesignstudios from GaiaDesignStudios said 4 years ago

    Great post!

  • paramountvintage

    kristin from blackmoonsky said 4 years ago

    Absolutely beautiful. I tried this in an art class years ago. It was so much fun!

  • CindysCrazyCreations

    Cindy Peanick from CrazyCreationsbyC said 4 years ago

    I would love to do this!

  • thebaubledept

    thebaubledept from TheBaubleDept said 4 years ago

    I really enjoyed learning a little bit of the history behind this art form. I didn't really know anything about pyrography, but now I feel like I will have a much greater appreciation for it when I see it!

  • raccoonvalleyrouge

    Rebecca Blevins from RaccoonValleyRouge said 4 years ago

    We have so much wood for our rocket stove! Can't wait to start. >>> New project everyday!

  • sdrafke

    Suzette from Suzetteupcycled said 4 years ago

    Fascinating and absolutely BEAUTIFUL!!!

  • gilstrapdesigns

    Debra Gilstrap from gilstrapdesigns said 4 years ago

    Such and interesting article and such beautiful work.

  • deadsetbabes

    dead set babes from deadsetbabes said 4 years ago

    It's such an amazing, painstaking craft. The pieces you've shown are absolutely stunning, thanks for this article!

  • shawilson1

    Marsha Wilson from shawilson1 said 4 years ago

    Thank you Jeni for the inclusion of my Trio of drooping blooms. I am honored to be among such talented artisans. Shawilson1

  • junomary

    Mary Anderson from ForWhoYouAre said 4 years ago

    I had never heard the name pyrography before! I have seen many works of art using it and think they are beautiful. So far the only wood-burning art that I do is eyes for Waldorf type dolls. This inspires my to try some pyroraphy on a wooden egg. and a wooden bowl that I have. Thanks for a wonderful blog. Thanks you for showing the work of some of it's artists.

  • Jemplosion

    Gina Giorno from FusionFrenzy said 4 years ago

    Gorgeous items! I think I was about 14 years old when I tried this for myself. I burned the image of a ship into a decorative piece of wood for my Dad (who still has it). Didn't realize it was called Pyrography. Guess I would've figured it out if I had stuck with it. :)

  • ModFarmgirl

    ModFarmgirl from ModFarmgirl said 4 years ago

    Great article! I have seen pyrography on boxes at antique shops, but I had no idea what it was called. Very interesting!

  • mulberrylanefolkart

    Jennifer Beers from mulberrylanefolkart said 4 years ago

    Great article! Love the Art Nouveau pyrography table!

  • GeorgieGirlLLC

    D George from GeorgieGirlLLC said 4 years ago

    I love Etsy, they bring the world to you. Thank you for enlightening us. Great article!

  • truecolorprints

    truecolorprints from truecolorprints said 4 years ago

    Interesting article!

  • CafePrimrose

    Amanda Gynther from CafePrimrose said 4 years ago

    Wow! So cool!

  • alyssask1

    Sarah Mata from IdleHandsVintage said 4 years ago

    Wow I did not realize this had a name. Now I can appreciate it more when I see it!

  • silverlily786

    Fatema from SilverLilyJewelry said 4 years ago

    Absolutely loving the detailed work always thought it was etching no idea the tool is heated and the wood burnt!

  • JenniferPlum

    Jennifer from CharcoalCouture said 4 years ago

    https://www.etsy.com/listing/116826837/third-eye-necklace-wooden-necklace-wood Thank-you for covering this topic. I am a pyrography artist myself here on Etsy and glad to see so much enthusiasm for this form of art!

  • WoodrockTurning

    Kerry and Rie from WoodrockTurning said 4 years ago

    Very interesting!! We want to try this one day...

  • christineshmisteen

    CHRISTINE SHMISTEEN from TheArtOfFinerThings said 4 years ago

    so gorgeous... I love the bowl

  • mabcrafter

    Mary Ann Brandow from littlebits101 said 4 years ago

    I saw some wonderful art using this method, and yet there was a twist. They used a magnifying glass to burn words on driftwood. It was magnificent. I don't know how they were able to achieve the precision they did but I sure admired their work!

  • Craftelina

    vik and ig from Craftelina said 4 years ago

    Right! We also have a simple pyrograph and do enjoy it a lot! :)) Thanks for the article. Fantastic! :)))))

  • Iammie

    iammie from iammie said 4 years ago

    Amazing!

  • catchaleaf

    eva andrews from catchaleaf said 4 years ago

    It is fantastic to know that craftsmanship is still appreciated, treasured and practiced in today’s society. Great article!

  • katrinaalana

    Katrina Alana from KatrinaAlana said 4 years ago

    So that's what it's called. The designs are so intricate and lovely.

  • BarnshopAntiques

    Carol Bender from BarnshopAntiques said 4 years ago

    Beautiful. I have fond memories of my Dad creating this way.

  • carley465

    CAT Tillinghast from CATTATTING said 4 years ago

    Very Interesting. I love the crafts that have a history similar to the craft that I choose to do. Beautiful work.

  • SnPCrafts

    Paul Buhrmester from SnPCrafts said 4 years ago

    That's awesome! Certainly my favorite thing to do these days.

  • 118jan

    Janette from AmericanDollClothes said 4 years ago

    I have always loved this art, never really understood how it was done. Thanks so much for sharing it with us.

  • lmouer

    Lynsey from lmouer said 4 years ago

    What a great post! Love that hand mirror!

  • woodhausstudio

    Beth Slocum from woodhausstudio said 4 years ago

    I love Pyrography! Really is a very unique and interesting artform, and I love being a pyrogrpahic artist myself... We have some bowls available for sale at our shop - take a look sometime!

  • deodorantshop

    Deodorant Shop from deodorantshop said 4 years ago

    beautiful!

  • anordicrose

    virginie lykins from anordicrose said 4 years ago

    Beautiful !

  • peshka

    Peshka from Peshka said 4 years ago

    Interesting and beautiful !

  • Feille

    sharon from EmbellishedLife2 said 4 years ago

    Love pyrography. I have a heat pen and have done it on leather, suede and wood. I plan to revisit it soon!

  • LoveButtons

    Julia K Walton from JKWaltonCollages said 4 years ago

    Very talented artists - I especially love the bowl with the leafy border - so intricate and beautiful :)

  • NinaRaizel

    Nina from NinaRaizel said 4 years ago

    So beautiful. I've got to try my hand at pyrography now. What a wonderful method of mark making!

  • SimpleThymePrims

    ronda Tedder from simplethymeprims said 4 years ago

    Wonderful post!...beautiful art..

  • HeatherBuchanan

    Heather Buchanan from HeatherBuchanan said 4 years ago

    Woah! When I think of wood burning, i immediately think of those corny little kits and their stiff illustrations. You've opened my eyes to just how fluid and beautiful pyrography can be. Thanks for the history lesson!

  • WickedDarling

    WickedDarling from WickedDarling said 4 years ago

    What a fabulous article!!! Thanks so much for sharing this!!

  • matildecanepagonzale

    Matilde Cánepa González from matildecanepaArtnow said 4 years ago

    Cute Reminder pyrography art is very nice when I've done on wood, the smell coming from. It has its magic.

  • aressa

    aressa from OriginalBridalHanger said 4 years ago

    Awesome! Thanks for sharing your talent.

  • HennaTrails

    Kristy McCurry from OurFolkLife said 4 years ago

    Nice post, I do love smell of cedar as it is being pyrographed.

  • nativestrandsjewelry

    Rachel from PeppersJewelry said 4 years ago

    Fascinating article. I have seen pyrography before, but did not know the details of the process of creating the finished design. Thanks for filling us in with this article!

  • ellabellamay

    Ursula Goetz from ellabellamay said 4 years ago

    Absolutely stunning work! Art found in everyday things is a true blessing.

  • NaturalVintage

    Amy from NaturalVintage said 4 years ago

    Thank you for sharing your knowledge of pyrography with us! The universe never ceases to amaze me - just yesterday I listed the first piece of vintage pyrography that I've found in my travels, and today I find your feature!

  • patspottery

    Pat Parker from PatsPottery said 4 years ago

    LOVE this article!! Did some wood burning as a kid, brings back so many memories.

  • brooksbarrow

    brooks barrow from brooksbarrow said 4 years ago

    Neat Work!!

  • H88255

    H88255 from HillarysSuperfoods said 4 years ago

    Your work shows you really love what you are creating!

  • pmerriam

    Phyllis from DaliLamaMama said 4 years ago

    Thought this was just a fifties thing practiced by Boy Scouts (the true pyros). Now we know the true history with beautiful examples of a lost art now resurrected.

  • OttomanGift

    Ömer Tatar from YaFur said 4 years ago

    Thanks for showcasing this great art!

  • bboster

    Barbara Boster from SmallThingsForgotten said 4 years ago

    Very nice blog! I love pyrography and first got to know it through Eastern European art. Especially love it when combined with paint. Have been waffling over whether I can bear to sell a fabulous Albanian tray that I bought for my shop but have become very attached to. Same thing happened with a Russian pyrographic painting of colorful onion dome churches. Great stuff!

  • ionesAttic

    Barbara from ionesAttic said 4 years ago

    Flemish Art is another search term for vintage pyrography. A great article is here with photos of Gibson girls types in Brooklyn based turn of the century studio: http://thedutchrose.blogspot.com/2012/08/playing-with-fire-is-bad.html

  • richardsonrita

    Rita Richardson from RJsCrafts said 4 years ago

    I think that wood burning is a wonderful hobby, as well as serious artwork. Wood is such a wonderful material to work with being beautiful, changeable, usable, and natural. I honestly became addicted to pyrography years ago when I went over to a friends house while they were working on some signs, and they let me pitch in and help with them. That was all it took for me to get hooked and I love it.

  • MsFoodie

    MsFoodie from MsFoodie said 4 years ago

    I love the smell and I love the art and I love the steady hand it must take I super duper LOVE MY WEDDING ALBUM made by Maya also from Etsy :) https://www.etsy.com/shop/bkinspired

  • queenofcupcakes

    Marion Cardwell-Ferrer from marionsvintagebakery said 4 years ago

    Thank you for this article. It's one more craft to add toy already dauntingist; however; this feels very achievable! And since I love the smell of wood burning when fall arrives, I'm sure I will love this too! Thank you!

  • Lynndart

    lynn dobbins from Lynndart said 4 years ago

    It is so wonderful to finally see pyrography getting it's due as a fine art form It is wonderfully calming and if you like the smell of campfires you will love it!

  • WhimsyWoodCreations

    WhimsyWoodCreations from WhimsyWoodCreations said 3 years ago

    Beautiful Work!

  • amadeusw666

    Dorothy N from amadeusw666 said 1 year ago

    Nice article but somewhat incomplete. Actually, in it's simplest form, pyrography can originally be traced back to Africa where a pointed wood stick could be used to burn simplistic designs onto different objects. Just saying.

Sign in to add your own