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Focused on the Frame

Jun 23, 2012

by Chappell Ellison

Etsy.com handmade and vintage goods

If you ever get the chance to view the painting Washington Crossing the Delaware in the American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the first thing you’ll notice is its size. At 14 feet tall and 21 feet wide, the gigantic masterwork elicits gasps. For nearly a century, the iconic painting has been part of the Met’s collection, but until recently, no one paid much attention to its quiet co-star: the frame.

In 2007, a Met curator came across an 1864 photo of Washington Crossing the Delaware by Matthew Brady, the famous Civil War photographer. He immediately noticed that the frame in the photograph was strikingly different. Staff research revealed that the plain gold frame museum curators and patrons had come to know was nothing like the original: a highly detailed piece decorated with ornate, hand-carved American iconography.

With a renovation of the American Wing about to begin, the curators knew it was a perfect opportunity to recreate the magnificent frame. Suzanne Smeaton, an expert in American frames, spearheaded a collaboration between dozens of people — curators, framers, architects, wood carvers, engineers — whose entire lives became consumed by designing and constructing the new frame. The task took several years and dozens of hands, through various phases of research, construction, carving and gilding.

Andy Langager on Flickr

The simple frame that housed the painting prior to the re-created original.

Despite their supporting role, there is a growing awareness and appreciation for frames. Crafted from fine materials through the steady, practiced hand of a woodcarver, frames were just as much a historical artifact of their time as the art they housed. The intricate patterns and motifs sealed with gold leaf reveal the artistic trends of a bygone era. In the past, curators rarely documented the frames that arrived with artworks and, as a result, many have been lost. “Frames generally take a backseat,” explains Smeaton, “but, when present, they’re truly an extension of the art itself.” Beyond historical considerations, frames are subject to aesthetic choices. “A lot of frames have been removed from their artworks due to the vagaries of taste. What we love right now is probably not what they’re going to love in 50 years,” Smeaton notes.

Smeaton realizes that by recreating a piece of the past, she and the team were taking liberties. “It’s really subjective,” Smeaton admits. For those concerned with authenticity in art, the frame might seem a bit disingenuous; like an Instagram photo filter, it imitates the past. Smeaton adds, “To this day, I can have a very animated exchange with my coworkers about, ‘Is this the right frame for this particular painting?'”

Once the frame was finished, getting it to the Met was no mean feat. In preparation for the trip, it was taken apart and carefully wrapped, while a small, protective crate was created for the crest. Since the museum’s freight elevators could not accommodate the frame’s length, it went through the front door and up the grand staircase. A row of seven men hoisted the frame on their shoulders, carefully snaking through galleries and dodging glass vitrines filled with costly ancient pottery and decorative art. Dozens of engineers, architects and handlers worked together to hoist the frame upright and get it in place around the priceless painting.

Despite in-depth research, Smeaton isn’t sure where the original George Washington frame went. “I harbor a fantasy that after [this frame] has been on view for a few years, someone is going to write to the Met and say ‘You know, we have a crest that looks a lot like that,'” Smeaton says. “It’s hard to believe that someone would discard such a thing.” With more attention being paid, maybe fewer frames will get lost in the fray.

Art Category

4 Featured Comments

  • simpleedesigns

    Lee Castle from SimpleeDesigns said 4 years ago Featured

    The right frame will set off a work of art perfectly. As an embroiderer and beader, I have been known to spend hours looking for just the right frame to show off a piece of work I have spent countless hours working on. All of my hard work deserves the best frame and I think this painting looks amazing in its new frame!

  • AmazinMaisie

    AmazinMaisie from AmazinMaisie said 4 years ago Featured

    What I love is the differences the better frame made to the entire "atmosphere" of the piece. Notice how close the other pictures were to the picture in the simple frame--the larger frame has more "presence" and seems to demand more space and attention. Surely that's what the artist meant it to have in the first place.

  • RETTOCAMME

    Emma Cotter from RETTOCAMME said 4 years ago Featured

    It is so great to see this project featured on Etsy! I actually am a colleague of Suzanne Smeaton and a consultant for Eli Wilner & Company so I had the pleasure to personally watch the master carvers and gilders bring this frame to life over the last few years. It was very inspiring!

  • lovelyfeverboutique

    Jessica from LovelyFever said 4 years ago Featured

    I always love the art-focused articles that this blog writer does, as I always gives me food for thought. When I go to an art museum or gallery, I am often attracted to the paintings that have a gorgeous, ornate frames. I am a little surprised that the frames have not received the same documentation--that historical records have not been regularly created. I think its wonderful that the MET museum recreated the original frame--it really adds a sense of regency. And I am sure that original frame is somewhere in the world!

90 comments

  • CafePrimrose

    Amanda Gynther from CafePrimrose said 4 years ago

    Sounds like a beautiful frame. I hope i get to see it someday.

  • hmmills

    Helen Mills from 1820BagCo said 4 years ago

    I have seen this glorious painting in its simple frame, I could just imagine how it would appear in that ornate frame, wow.

  • specimenboxshop

    Gabriele Cavender from specimenboxshop said 4 years ago

    Just wanted to emphatically agree with the author about the importance of frames and their often under-appreciated value added to an artist's creation. I try to always ensure the the right combination of subject matter and frame when composing and constructing each of my pieces - the frame literally "dresses" and surrounds the subject, in my case mostly natural history specimens, and becomes an integral part of the work. The frame is very much a part of the composition and requires careful thought and consideration in its application!

  • inapigsear

    Maria Corey from sowsearjewels said 4 years ago

    Very interesting article! It has inspired me to take a trip to one of my local art museums, since I can't get to the Met at the moment.

  • ErikaPrice

    Erika from ErikaPrice said 4 years ago

    A masterpiece painting deserves a frame to match, and makes all the difference to an important work such as this. Even lesser works can benefit from a beautiful frame - as a child I remember watching my dad painstaking restoring similar but much smaller frames - he always have several on the go in varying stages of renovation, and would spend hours making molds to remodel broken bits out of plaster and applying gold leaf to the end result

  • patriciaheyer

    Patricia Heyer from PaintingsbyPat said 4 years ago

    Thanks so much for the article. I too agree the framing really is an intricate part of the painting.

  • maddyq

    madeline maddy picard from maddyq said 4 years ago

    If you ever get to Florence, Italy, you will see all the great masterpieces framed in very intricate frames. The artists had a seperate staff just to make the frame they had designed to frame their work. Love the article.

  • simpleedesigns

    Lee Castle from SimpleeDesigns said 4 years ago Featured

    The right frame will set off a work of art perfectly. As an embroiderer and beader, I have been known to spend hours looking for just the right frame to show off a piece of work I have spent countless hours working on. All of my hard work deserves the best frame and I think this painting looks amazing in its new frame!

  • BubbleFestival

    C Choi from BubbleFestival said 4 years ago

    Interesting! compare with the old frame, the new frame brings new impact to the painting! The frame itself is a great art piece!!

  • MegansMenagerie

    Megan from MegansMenagerie said 4 years ago

    Wow...that is a beautiful frame! I love how different it can make the picture look.

  • kh1467

    Kelly from KikuPaper said 4 years ago

    For further information on the subject, read "The Secret Lives of Frames: One Hundred Years of Art and Artistry" by Deborah Davis. Excellent read with lots of fantastic photos and in-depth historical information on the subject.

  • mirabellamorello

    mirabellamorello from mirabellamorello said 4 years ago

    Very interesting post. I am so glad to see a reversal in thinking from "the frame should not detract from the painting" concept. Obviously, the original frame was beautiful and perfect in that it reflected the grand feeling of this piece. I always look at frames, when they are beautiful and hope that the artwork of framing will become more valued once again for the true form of art it is in and of itself.

  • AmazinMaisie

    AmazinMaisie from AmazinMaisie said 4 years ago Featured

    What I love is the differences the better frame made to the entire "atmosphere" of the piece. Notice how close the other pictures were to the picture in the simple frame--the larger frame has more "presence" and seems to demand more space and attention. Surely that's what the artist meant it to have in the first place.

  • FranceGallery

    France Gallery from FranceGallery said 4 years ago

    Interesting information on the frames used for this painting.

  • towngarden

    katherine olivia slicher from EnglishRegalia said 4 years ago

    I was in San Juan Capistrano last week (I live in the UK) and I purchased a vintage wooden frame with intricate gesso detail. Very damaged but delightful. I saw it being eyed by a very handsome guy and I jokingly asked if he would like to buy it. "I am an artist, I can't afford frames!" This is so often the case and art is often sold in plain simple beech frames, but I totally agree that a frame can make a picture.

  • jessicaoart

    Jessica Ostrander from jessicaoart said 4 years ago

    What a magnificent piece. I would love to see it in person!

  • ladykim5000

    ladykim5000 said 4 years ago

    With the new "old" frame, the picture looks so very different and certainly much stronger. It just shows how important the frame is to the overall work.

  • vintagebutterfly94

    Vanessa Ryerse from TheClassicButterfly said 4 years ago

    I have a crazy passion for vintage frames and display them -empty- in my home in various places. You'll notice I almost never carry them in my shop because I can't bear to part with them. Loved this article.

  • Iammie

    iammie from iammie said 4 years ago

    Interesting!

  • PruAtelier

    Jeanne B from PruAtelier said 4 years ago

    The frame is there to give praise to the work it showcases! Without the substantive frame in all its glory making the formal introduction, half of the impact of the art is never presented! It is like a woman going to the ball wearing casual shoes with her gown....the complete picture is not there!

  • marisolspoonmakery

    Marisol Spoon from MarisolSpoonMakery said 4 years ago

    Totally agree, we started making our own sculptural frames due to the lack of "interesting" frames out there. We see the frame as art in itself!

  • satellitedaisy

    satellitedaisy from satellitedaisy said 4 years ago

    I most often include the frame as part of the piece when creating paintings, collages & even photographic displays. It started as a way to save money as custom framing can be quite costly but this practice has really become a favorite part of my process. Wonderful post!

  • PaperAffection

    Suanne from PaperAffection said 4 years ago

    I thought I was the only one who noticed frames! I love old, handmade wood frames, the detail, the love, and the way it draws the attention in. What a fantastic recreation for an American icon.

  • TheSewingGin

    TheSewingGin from TheSewingGin said 4 years ago

    I love old frames. They have such character. Thanks for the post.

  • volkerwandering

    Jess from volkerwandering said 4 years ago

    I love the globes & eagle on the frame, such a nice touch!

  • KMalinka

    Natalia from KMalinkaVintage said 4 years ago

    Amazing art!

  • StringBeardCraftery

    Stephanie from StringBeardCraftery said 4 years ago

    I absolutely adore gilded, ornate frames. I hope to one day have a Baroque themed room in my home just full of molding and gorgeous art.

  • Zalavintage

    Zane Saracene from Zalavintage said 4 years ago

    the impact of the original frame on the first viewers must have been breathtaking, awe-inspiring.. I wonder where it was originally displayed?

  • KaiceJoy

    Kirsti Joy from KaiceJoy said 4 years ago

    incredible story. love the tales a frame alone can hold!

  • ArtsyFlair

    Michaela Bowles from ArtsyFlair said 4 years ago

    Intriguing! That is a breathtakingly gorgeous frame!

  • lamaisonbleue2010

    Carol Elsworthy from LaMaisonBleueCarol said 4 years ago

    I am so happy to have stumbled onto this wonderful blog bringing awareness to the wonderful craftsmanship of gold leaf gilding and framing. They say *clothes maketh the man* likewise with a painting and its relationship with the frame. My husband is a third generation GOLD LEAF GILDER & CONSERVATOR, we are truly blessed in the course of his career to have worked on some wonderful historic frames/works of art. A frame like this is magnificent. Glad to read all these wonderful comments about frames. In addition, I would like to make a comment about another wonderful *dying art* FRENCH MATTING, my husband Harry Elsworthy specializes in creating and carrying on this tradition. French Mats are a series of handpainted watercolor lines usually with handmade gold paper surrounding watercolors and paper art. For more check out his blog at http://giltwoodstudios.blogspot.com/ Finally, I would like to thank Chappell Ellison for this wonderful article and blog. Thank you most sincerely, Carol Elsworthy.

  • PattiTrostle

    Patti Trostle from PattiTrostle said 4 years ago

    So many different frames to choose from when framing a painting. It is an art in itself choosing a frame. Everyone has a different preference, just like when choosing art.

  • anordicrose

    virginie lykins from anordicrose said 4 years ago

    Wow ! What a gorgeous frame.... too bad framing is so expensive.... , but it does aff to the charm of a work of art !

  • klb00e

    Mother Lark from MotherLark said 4 years ago

    Such a cool article!

  • Itsalook

    Kristi McNelly from Itsalook said 4 years ago

    I love art history and this painting is breathtaking. I think I saw it when my parents took my sister and me on a trip to Washington D.C. Great great article. I will read it again Kristi itsalook.etsy.com, the fashion tie dye company!!!

  • bedouin

    Nicole from bedouin said 4 years ago

    frames can be as individual as the piece framed ~*~

  • Hollyknitting

    Holly Hess from HOLLYANNHESS said 4 years ago

    This is a very timely article. The frame is an integral part of a finished work. As an artist, painting in threads, I'm always in search of the right frame. Creating one is often, the only solution.

  • TresChicNmodern

    TresChicNmodern from TresChicNmodern said 4 years ago

    WHAT AN AMAZING BLOG!!!!!!!!!! I LOVE THE EXQUISITE PAINTINGS!!!!!!!!!!!! DEFINITELY EYE CANDY :-)

  • lovelygifts

    Linda from lovelygifts said 4 years ago

    That is truly a beautiful frame that goes so well with the painting!

  • LivingVintage

    LivingVintage from LivingVintage said 4 years ago

    Great story!

  • Parachute425

    Terry from Parachute425 said 4 years ago

    Fascinating.

  • RETTOCAMME

    Emma Cotter from RETTOCAMME said 4 years ago Featured

    It is so great to see this project featured on Etsy! I actually am a colleague of Suzanne Smeaton and a consultant for Eli Wilner & Company so I had the pleasure to personally watch the master carvers and gilders bring this frame to life over the last few years. It was very inspiring!

  • xZOUix

    Zoui from XZOUIX said 4 years ago

    oh lala :::-) my bachelors degree final exams are on tuesday and i'm tryin' to earn some knowledge, including history of art & aesthetics. so have to focus what's in the frame :) and this is such a dejavuuuuuu! -nice frame works btw! i always look at the whole thing, including frame & installation :)

  • xZOUix

    Zoui from XZOUIX said 4 years ago

    oh lala :::-) my bachelors degree final exams are on tuesday and i'm tryin' to earn some knowledge, including history of art & aesthetics. so have to focus what's in the frame :) and this is such a dejavuuuuuu! i always look at the whole thing, including frame & installation :)

  • EmiliaFaith

    Edie Ann from OhHoneyHush said 4 years ago

    What a difference it makes for the painting! Amazing! I hope I get the chance to see it one day.

  • AThymetoSew

    Arlene from AThymetoSew said 4 years ago

    What a wonderful article!

  • asundrynotion

    asundrynotion from asundrynotion said 4 years ago

    No wonder this painting 'elicits gasps'. The frame is as much a work of art as the painting and truly an integral part. Just the photo is remarkable.

  • studioku

    studioku from studioku said 4 years ago

    Thank you, Chappell. I find myself liking your blogs. I like both your style of writing and the subjects you choose. I restore historical paintings and murals that are rather in large scale than regular easel paintings and this blog definitely caught my attention.

  • takingshape

    Aleta Ford Baker from AletaFordBakerDesign said 4 years ago

    Glad that I took the time to read your article - well-written, informative as well as timely and entertaining!

  • linneaheide

    Linnea from linneaheideart said 4 years ago

    Which comes first the chicken or the egg?

  • shuqi

    Emily Lim from shuqi said 4 years ago

    great article:)

  • misswoof

    Helga from bitsydoodle said 4 years ago

    magnificent....

  • BrittneyWest

    Brittney West from BrittneyWest said 4 years ago

    What a great read... "Let the beauty of what you love be what you do."--Rumi

  • redemptionart

    Connie Haskell from redemptionart said 4 years ago

    Being a vintage junkie...frames are always in my scope of vision, so often times I find a wonderful piece of old art that has been re-framed in some piece of junk and wonder what ever came of the original frame! Great article, thanks! Aloha!

  • JanFairhurstPottery

    Jan from JanFairhurstPottery said 4 years ago

    Intriguing article!

  • BlueMoonLights

    Alexandra Simons from BlueMoonLights said 4 years ago

    Great post! Thank you :)

  • Steampunkitis

    Susan Jane from Steampunkitis said 4 years ago

    I've painted for many years, and frames were very important. Essentially the frame becomes a part of the painting. I sometimes found very old ornate frames, and then created a painting for them. The older the frame the better. Imagine what works it housed in the past, and then create a new life for it to frame and become a part of. Those were the days.

  • lovelyfeverboutique

    Jessica from LovelyFever said 4 years ago Featured

    I always love the art-focused articles that this blog writer does, as I always gives me food for thought. When I go to an art museum or gallery, I am often attracted to the paintings that have a gorgeous, ornate frames. I am a little surprised that the frames have not received the same documentation--that historical records have not been regularly created. I think its wonderful that the MET museum recreated the original frame--it really adds a sense of regency. And I am sure that original frame is somewhere in the world!

  • RetrofitBecky

    Becky from RetrofitStyle said 4 years ago

    Well done! Freed my inner artist! Thanks so much.

  • buckscountyframes

    Carl Christensen from CarlChristensen said 4 years ago

    As a frame maker for over 15 years I so appreciate the difference the correct frame and presentation makes. Great article.

  • paramountvintage

    kristin from blackmoonsky said 4 years ago

    frames have always been my favorite part of a painting. the more ornate the better!

  • soniamt3

    Sonia Lewis from Soniasfineart said 4 years ago

    Thank you so much for this info.I love ornate frames and do frame some of my works with them.

  • messinabella

    messinabella from BandBEstate said 4 years ago

    Great post!

  • iloveriley286

    iloveriley286 said 4 years ago

    What an amazing post, and the fact that there is potential to find the original frame some day and hear about its story since the 1864 photo is exciting! Thanks!

  • sarahridgley

    Sarah Ridgley from PheasantPress said 4 years ago

    I love collecting antique frames from estate sales and auctions. They are so beautiful even when empty.

  • rins

    Rinske Dekker from rins said 4 years ago

    I loved this article. Frames can do a lot for and with the artwork. And what an amazing frame!!

  • araisedbanner

    Barry Callahan from araisedbanner said 4 years ago

    Brilliant article all around. Thanks!

  • NorthwestBridal

    Jennifer from NorthwestBridal said 4 years ago

    The painting is much more dramatic with the new larger more ornate frame on it, I think they made the right choice changing it. In my opinion, the frame is half of what makes the whole piece, one is not complete without the other, so it is very important.

  • jewelryrage

    Aaron Kish from JewelryRage said 4 years ago

    Great post thanks.

  • wandadean1

    Wanda Dean from FiberandFantasy said 4 years ago

    I found this article so interesting. I have seen this painting at the Met, and will go view it again when I visit the city. Thank you for sharing this.

  • HobbitUnderTheHill

    Amy D from HobbitUnderTheHill said 4 years ago

    stunning.

  • opendoorstudio

    Martha Layton Smith from opendoorstudio said 4 years ago

    Thank you for sharing. I love that first photo almost looks surreal! it needed its grand frame back... it looked lost without it! stately and perfect for this time of year! Happy 4th to you all !

  • AMSkrafts

    AMSkrafts from AMSkrafts said 4 years ago

    I'm so glad they tried creating a replica of the frame to complete the art piece. Thank you so much for sharing! I hope to see it in real life.

  • joyceweaver

    Joyce Weaver from joyceweaver said 4 years ago

    A great article! My husband hand crafts all of my art frames and what few meager awards I've won I'm sure it was because of the frame & not the art! Thanks for sharing some wonderful history with us!

  • HeidiMaeDesigns

    Heidi Mae from FancyThisToo said 4 years ago

    As my Mother an artist always says, many of her paintings are sold because of the frame. It holds true for this fabulous painting. Love it!! thanks for sharing.

  • DreamSight

    Marta Morales from DreamSight said 4 years ago

    A good frame help the picture inside. I have to confess I could buy some art only for the frame :D

  • janewearjewelry

    janewearjewelry from janewearjewelry said 4 years ago

    Many have no idea the significance and history of this painting! The original was painted in Germany where it was destroyed in an airstrike in 1944. This is the recreated piece of art that resides here, featuring not just George Washington, but Madison holding the flag, a woman, a Scott, and an African American. It was recreated by a man from Berlin in 1850, just after the ‘Spring of Nations’, which took place on February 23, 1848. What caused this eerily familiar sounding revolution to breakout across Europe on the 23rd? Just two days prior, on February 21st, 1848, Karl Marx published the Communist Manifesto. How does it relate to this picture? And what does history? What is it screaming to America? It was communism that led to the Spring of Nations that broke out all over Europe, and one man lived in America, who was a German, went back and said ‘No! that’s the wrong direction’.” Why would the painter include a woman, a farmer, an African American, all together in this one painting? Because, the average person, when linked together, can do anything! Thank you, Etsy for bringing some attention to this painting! It is incredibly significant!

  • GoldenSpiralDesigns

    Lola Ocian from GoldenSpiralDesigns said 4 years ago

    That reconstructed frame is certainly magnificent! It's funny to me, because in art school, we were taught that the frame should be as simple and elegant as possible - you want it to look so harmonious, no one bothers to notice the frame. I guess if you're talking about a 14 ft. tall piece of artwork, that's a different scenario. It's neat to see that painting, for personal reasons. I'm told that the man on the back, manning the rudder, is my ancestor.

  • TheBeautyofBoredom

    Gracie from TheBeautyofBoredom said 4 years ago

    Love the new frame. I think it is safe to say that having that large piece of art work on a plain, white wall by itself, instead of crowded in with some other paintings like it is in the older picture, really makes it stand out more. It's not just the frame, although I do love the new frame. It works well with the piece. Despite this, I am not sure if I would know how to frame my pieces if I ever decided to. I don't know much about frames or framing, I would probably play it safe until I knew what I was doing.

  • kazzphoto

    Kevin Cassidy from kazzphoto said 4 years ago

    the simpler the better

  • suzannesmeaton

    Suzanne Smeaton said 4 years ago

    What a nice surprise- I am delighted to see this project shared with so many who truly appreciate the talent, creativity and artistry involved. The frame was crafted by Eli Wilner & Company where I am the gallery director and have worked since 1986. Eli championed period frames when people were regularly discarding them. As a framer for over 35 years I see frames as a marvelous distillation of sculpture, architecture, craft and fine art. Thanks, Chappell!

  • windycitynovelties

    Windy City Novelties said 4 years ago

    The frame really brings the piece to life. I love how detailed the frame is. Very beautiful work of art.

  • anascrafties

    Ana Hernández from Anascrafties said 4 years ago

    The quiet co-star … couldn’t agree more!! I believe any work of art is such as a whole, frames are not there just to “hold” a beautiful painting, they can certainly add to it, and a great deal! I apply the same principle to the jewelry I make, a beautiful bead is much more so if framed by an equally beautiful thread, so that in the end you create a beautiful piece of art, not just a necklace. Hurrah for the quiet co-stars in every art field!!!

  • LCooperDesigns

    LC Cooper from LeMaisonBelle said 4 years ago

    I collect paintings, and the frame can often be more valuable than the painting itself. Many impressionist painters (and others) made their own frames.

  • picturepainters

    picturepainters from PicturePainters said 4 years ago

    A frame can really make or break a painting. You need to find one that highlights and embodies the feeling/message of the painting, without overshaddowing it. Great job on the new frame, bold and brave!

  • Shippodo

    Ryosuke Ueda from Shippodo said 4 years ago

    A tradition that is shared both in the arts of East Asia and the West, re-creating a lost piece utilizing the technique and crafts of the past which helps modern artists to use those skills to create something different or unique. Even though a lot goes into creating a frame for a work of art, the effort given to recreate the frame is wonderful and educational for those involved.

  • metroretrovintage

    metroretrovintage from metroretrovintage said 4 years ago

    That new frame is quite beautiful. One of the most prolific experts on these old frames, used to drive around Manhattan in the 70's on garbage day -- where he would find and pick up for free, some of the most beautiful and gilded frames placed out on the sidewalks for the garbage truck, out of old mansions and brownstones. His collection is worth millions, and he was also featured in the now defunct Connoisseur magazine back in the 80's.

  • CityOfKaris

    CityOfKaris from CityOfKaris said 4 years ago

    Yeah! My whole Etsy business is based on vintage frames. I love to go thrifting and when I find hidden gems that others saw no value in :)

  • tarastephanos

    Tara Stephanos from tarastephanos said 4 years ago

    Framing is an art by itself. I have always struggled to frame my own art work; first the cost is as expensive as the art and then finding the right one and framing it correctly is a challenge. Painters paint! Framers frame and both create the finished product. When I paint commissioned projects the frame is seperate from the cost and always suggest people go to a proffesional

  • leeannasjewerybox

    Leeanna from LeeannasJewelryBox said 4 years ago

    The frame can make or brake a piece of art. I have to admit I liked the more elaborate frame for Washington Crossing the Delaware. I also think it is important how the artist themselves thought the painting should be framed. After all it was their muse, inspiration, and handiwork that brought the art into this world.

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