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An Interview with Dale Dougherty, MAKE Founder

Mar 5, 2013

by Karen Brown

Etsy.com handmade and vintage goods

He founded the web’s first commercial portal and is credited with coining the term “Web 2.0.”  But perhaps Dale Dougherty’s greatest achievement is as a publisher and event producer, first as co-founder of O’Reilly Media and today as head of Maker Mediaa newly independent company that publishes MAKE magazine and produces Maker FaireWe spoke at Maker Media’s Sebastopol, California, office.

Karen: The Make division of O’Reilly was founded in 2005, the same year Etsy launched. Is there a connection between those two events?

Dale: There’s a deep connection. I met [Etsy founder] Rob Kalin in San Francisco and I was really impressed with what he was doing. At that time, the web bubble had burst and Rob was a signal to me that it was coming back and that small teams of people could build incredible applications on the web. Investors weren’t thinking that was going to happen; they were looking for the next technology after the web. For me, seeing what Rob was doing with Etsy was an early sign of where the web would go. And I saw the DIY connection as well, of course.

nervoussystem

An intricate bracelet featured in Make: Ultimate Guide to 3D Printing.

Karen: And for you the DIY connection found its expression in MAKE?

Dale: MAKE helped to give a name to what people were already doing, to create visibility around it, and to recognize it as a part of ourselves that has value.

Karen: Why did you choose a magazine as the format?

Dale: Making has so many facets, I thought a magazine was the perfect format. I wanted something visual, exciting, something you could flip through with lots of variety. The trim size of MAKE is an homage to magazines like Popular Science and Popular Mechanics. I was fascinated by the role those magazines had in people’s lives. I felt a voice like that could still be fresh today.

VintageIndustrial

Vintage industrial frame dining table chosen by John Edgar Park, MAKE Author and Makezine Contributor.

Karen: How would you describe that voice?

Dale: There’s a big cultural thing here. If somebody says to me says that I should be a good consumer, I feel deflated, I feel like you are treating me like dirt, and underestimating who I am and what I can do. Consuming is sold as “easy,” but if we only do things that are easy, we don’t end up with a very high valuation of what we can do. Being a maker — being creative and productive — is operating at a different level, and it’s not necessarily easy. So, the magazine offers another voice and set of values. Because of the magazine, I was meeting a lot of people and I thought, “What would happen if they could meet each other? And would the public enjoy talking with them?” That’s what led to Maker Faire. When you put passionate people together, you have a different view of mankind. You see that people are generous, wonderful, and creative. That’s what I think is core in all this, that DIY in its broadest context is a kind of social glue and an instigator of community.

WalnutStudiolo

6 Pack Frame Cinch chosen by Gillian BenAry, MAKE Sales and Marketing Coordinator.

Karen: In the future, where do you see the role of making in education?

Dale: I think DIY has a lot to say about education and learning. We have a top down mindset in education. We take control away from kids and say, “You have to do all these things that we mandate,” instead of working with their motivation and interest. I think the future for education is that kids will have more control over it, and that there will be more choices beyond what the education system provides. I think kids can come to learning from a sense of play. Then, they might want to take what they are learning seriously at some point as a job.

Karen: Do you think there is a connection between the Maker movement and ecological concerns? For example, what role does making play in a world with limited resources?

Dale: In a world of limited resources we need to be resourceful, and the Maker mindset encourages that. If there is something I could wish for America, it’s that we would restore resourcefulness as a middle class virtue. In the old sense of DIY, there was the understanding that if we worked on our home or made our own clothes, we had a better life as a result. We had something that money couldn’t buy —the rewards of our efforts, satisfaction, and engagement with others. Those things are at the heart of how and why we live.

Teethware

A 3D printed teacup featured in Make: Ultimate Guide to 3D Printing.

Karen: So as opposed to the old romantic image of an artist working in isolation, you see making as a way of being social?

Dale: Well, let’s look at it — we make things for special occasions, right? Why do we cook when friends come over instead just ordering take out? It’s a sign of caring about people. And when you do it, there is the added plus that you can become a good cook over time, and it also gives you a little moment to shine. But it all happens because you are caring about other people.

That’s really the heart of what led me to focus on “amateurs” at Maker Faire and with the magazine. The root of the word amateur is “to love.” I wanted to focus on people who really love what they are doing and making. I wanted to find that place and stick with it.

Editor’s note: for more picks from MAKE’s staff, check out the related items.

4 Featured Comments

  • valeriephoto

    Valerie from valeriestitchery said 6 years ago Featured

    I love the idea of Maker Faire. It's true: when you start tossing ideas back and forth, they grow, take shape, and can find a whole new level of expression you wouldn't necessarily have come up with on your own.

  • blainedesign

    Karen Brown from blainedesign said 6 years ago Featured

    The thing that impressed me the most in talking with Dale was the quality of language he used, words like "love," "heart," "caring," "friends," and "community." His view of people who make things was so notably tender and affectionate. And the staff at Make was warm and friendly. They seem to have created an environment that is smart, welcoming, and wide open to new ideas and serious play. Sometimes I think they give the Nobel Prize for Peace to the wrong people.

  • HibouCards

    Anne-Claire R. from HibouDesigns said 6 years ago Featured

    Amazing interview. I really like the idea of making as loving and caring for people. That's the way I feel when I make something and I truly feel like it is a way of being social. I love what I do and I feel very privileged to be able to do it! Thanks for this. Hibou

  • formandfunktion

    Stacy from formandfunktion said 6 years ago Featured

    Dale Dougherty is one of my local heroes and the Maker Movement is one of the things happening now that makes me think the world is going to be alright. I so agree with the idea that making creates community - just look at us here!

89 comments

  • MegansMenagerie

    Megan from MegansMenagerie said 6 years ago

    Great interview!!!

  • AlisaDesign

    Alisa from AlisaDesign said 6 years ago

    Great interview! Love that teeth tea cup! ;)

  • EdelweissPost

    Patrick from EdelweissPost said 6 years ago

    I am so heartened to see people *making* things again. In the US at least, it seems as if we have exported so many of our "maker" jobs to nameless, faceless masses we will never have a relationship with. With the success of organizations like Etsy and Maker Media, the concepts of 'craftsmanship' and 'artisanal' have become values in our consumer decision making. And these values add so much meaning to our daily lives and to the environments we surround ourselves in.

  • gboliver

    Gail Oliver from AttentionGetting said 6 years ago

    Some really innovative product designs. Love it!

  • LivingVintage

    LivingVintage from LivingVintage said 6 years ago

    Interesting! Not sure that "resourcefulness as a middle class virtue" is or ever was restricted to the US middle class.

  • valeriephoto

    Valerie from valeriestitchery said 6 years ago Featured

    I love the idea of Maker Faire. It's true: when you start tossing ideas back and forth, they grow, take shape, and can find a whole new level of expression you wouldn't necessarily have come up with on your own.

  • elisabethringewald

    Elisabeth Ringewald from MaineCoonCrafts said 6 years ago

    I actually believe that we are cycling back to the mindset of our parents who grew up in the depression, I see an increase in sewing and garment construction, diy projects and ideas to replace the flood of cheap imports that have no eclectic appeal or quality. I also feel that if you do your homework, you can find small private schools that do promote learning on a different curve. My son attended one in Park Slope, Brooklyn that just went outside of the box and the art program was pure heaven...

  • peshka

    Peshka from Peshka said 6 years ago

    Interesting interview (:

  • BozenaWojtaszek

    Bozena Wojtaszek from BozenaWojtaszek said 6 years ago

    Wise words! Do, make and mend :)

  • PopParty

    Leigh from PopParty said 6 years ago

    So excited this Make Magazine article included my Ecce Homo Paint By Number Kit! My PeeWee kit was featured in a Make Magazine gift guide, and I've been to the Maker Faire as well and thoroughly enjoyed it.

  • Trefemmes

    Roseann D'Elia from Trefemmes said 6 years ago

    Thanks! great interview. Oh I'm middle class

  • auntjanecan

    Jane Priser from JanePriserArts said 6 years ago

    Wonderful interview!!! I love MAKE Magazine and Make anything!

  • ArtyDidact

    Sharon Parker from ArtyDidact said 6 years ago

    I love this, and Make magazine is great. It is amazing how many people (middle class or not) are convinced that they can't do things themselves simply because they've never tried and they assume it's too complicated or difficult or they simply don't have the skill for it.

  • ikabags

    IKA PARIS from ikabags said 6 years ago

    Love to read ! Thanks !

  • gossamer531

    Gossamer Tearoom from TheGossamerTearoom said 6 years ago

    I very much enjoyed this article and as a child of parents who grew up in The Depression, I was very inspired to read that Dale believes that returning to resourcefulness would be beneficial to this country. I could not agree more!

  • silversamba

    Alana from silversamba said 6 years ago

    Great read! Glad to hear about Make magazine

  • gossamer531

    Gossamer Tearoom from TheGossamerTearoom said 6 years ago

    As a child of parents who grew up in The Depression, I would think that returning to resourcefulness (for all economic and social groups, not just the middle class) would be beneficial to this country.

  • tonycarl

    Anthony from MerchandiseLoft said 6 years ago

    nice!

  • GeorgieGirlLLC

    D George from GeorgieGirlLLC said 6 years ago

    Great post! My husband and I purchased a house bohemians lived in and they did not take their treasures. Oh what wonderful things they left behind.

  • WoodrockTurning

    Kerry and Rie from WoodrockTurning said 6 years ago

    Wood turning was educational program, elderly guys can do it. We can learn lots of things through the "making things". Great interview!!

  • fbstudiovt

    Laura Hale from FoundBeautyStudioArt said 6 years ago

    I deeply appreciate MAKE magazine. As a female maker and tinkerer, I've always had an inferiority complex when measuring my work against the men out there. Part of it has been my own hang up, and part of it has been the real scrutiny that many men in the comp sci/engineering/hard sciences give to women in the field. MAKE has given me a venue to share my work and gather inspiration from others. I'm now building indoor aquaponics and greywater phytoremediation systems in my house by myself, and I don't know that I would have had the confidence to realize I damn well know what I'm doing without forums like MAKE.

  • jdzmom02

    jdzmom02 said 6 years ago

    Mr. Dougherty is behind a Maker Class that started last year at my daughter's high school in Sebastopol, CA. He is an amazing inspiration to the students and has brought such an excitement to the school about creating & "making".

  • ThreeBarDGifts

    Monica from ThreeBarDGifts said 6 years ago

    Your comments about the future of education were interesting. Enjoyed the article!

  • VintageIndustrial

    Greg Hankerson from VintageIndustrial said 6 years ago

    Thanks for including me in the article!

  • HeatherMattoonArt

    Heather Mattoon from HeatherMattoonArt said 6 years ago

    wow!! Thank you!

  • PainterPeeps

    PainterPeeps from PainterPeeps said 6 years ago

    Very interesting interview. :)

  • deadsetbabes

    dead set babes from deadsetbabes said 6 years ago

    This is a really interesting article, thank you for doing it!

  • blainedesign

    Karen Brown from blainedesign said 6 years ago Featured

    The thing that impressed me the most in talking with Dale was the quality of language he used, words like "love," "heart," "caring," "friends," and "community." His view of people who make things was so notably tender and affectionate. And the staff at Make was warm and friendly. They seem to have created an environment that is smart, welcoming, and wide open to new ideas and serious play. Sometimes I think they give the Nobel Prize for Peace to the wrong people.

  • Powerofflower

    Lorena Balea-Raitz from LorenasInkDesigns said 6 years ago

    Wonderful article!

  • SmallkineCreations

    Amy from SmallkineCreations said 6 years ago

    Great interview. Thanks for sharing! Aloha. =)

  • fineartstoneware

    fineartstoneware from fineartstoneware said 6 years ago

    I enjoyed the article!

  • patspottery

    Pat Parker from PatsPottery said 6 years ago

    Very interesting. I had never heard of any of the discussed, so you are educating me:>)

  • opendoorstudio

    Martha Layton Smith from opendoorstudio said 6 years ago

    "If there is something I could wish for America, it’s that we would restore resourcefulness as a middle class virtue. In the old sense of DIY, there was the understanding that if we worked on our home or made our own clothes, we had a better life as a result. We had something that money couldn’t buy —the rewards of our efforts, satisfaction, and engagement with others. Those things are at the heart of how and why we live." ... AMEN!

  • Fanie

    Fanie Grégoire from Fanie said 6 years ago

    I love MAKE and I LOVED this interview. :-) Very informative and it makes me want to know even more about the team behind MAKE and it's wonderful contributors.

  • Iammie

    iammie from iammie said 6 years ago

    Interesting!

  • Beads4Broads

    Andy from Beads4Broads said 6 years ago

    Great article, keep them coming. Not so easy to throw away anything that someone has put their time, thoughts and creativity into. Plus those things make you smile a whole lot more!

  • PennyBirchWilliams

    Penny Birch-Williams from PennyBirchWilliams said 6 years ago

    Being resourceful, making our own things, making do...all these went by the wayside for a few decades in our culture, but there were always some of us continuing the traditions of our hardworking parents and grandparents. I think big corporations were manipulating people through advertising to be fixated on consuming more and more cheap (but profitable) factory made stuff. I am so glad to see that DIY, hand-making, recycling, repairing, and thriftiness is becoming more valued and respected again. We have so many options and opportunities now to combine the traditional arts, crafts, and skills with new technologies, giving us greater expression of our individual visions, and reaching interested people who support and value our work. Make magazine is very cool, my son loves it, and I'm happy that its founder supports our community of makers!

  • WalnutStudiolo

    Geoffrey and Valerie Franklin from WalnutStudiolo said 6 years ago

    Great interview! Thank you, MAKE and Etsy for supporting us crafters!

  • rosebudsvintage

    rosebudsvintage from WillowsWear said 6 years ago

    Great article. As a Baby Boomer my parents were very resourceful, as all parents of that time. My Mom made all her clothes, coats, hats, & covered her own shoes to match. My clothes were also made by her. My father had a big veggie garden and lovely flowers, all tended by him after a long day at the office. If there was something needed my dad, most times than not, made it himself. As another person wrote, seems like generations before weren't so wrong in their handiwork, craftiness, and resourcefulness. Keep up with the informative articles and features Love to read of so many talented people

  • ATLIART

    LIAT kires from ATLIART said 6 years ago

    Very interesting interview. :) thanx for sharing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • tastykaeru

    Kate from KateToft said 6 years ago

    Great interview! I'm totally honoured you included a pair of my earrings :D Thank you!

  • irinisklavounou

    irini from IrinisWorld said 6 years ago

    We are all working away in our own spaces, often with the primary aim of simply staying afloat, and it is encouraging to know that there are those who are surveying and making sense of the currents that we create, binding us into a larger picture that we can all feel a positive part of. A hearty round of applause for Karen and Dale and their own particular type of creativity.

  • BaanButterfly

    NA from Sawasdeekaa said 6 years ago

    very interesting

  • couponcode2012

    jay markarian said 6 years ago

    nice post

  • obviousfront

    obviousfront from obviousfront said 6 years ago

    When I began making multiple robots, the Maker Store placed the first BIG order. That support validated my efforts and kept me going.

  • mattyhandmadecrafts

    Matejka Max from NattyMatty said 6 years ago

    Thanks!

  • HibouCards

    Anne-Claire R. from HibouDesigns said 6 years ago Featured

    Amazing interview. I really like the idea of making as loving and caring for people. That's the way I feel when I make something and I truly feel like it is a way of being social. I love what I do and I feel very privileged to be able to do it! Thanks for this. Hibou

  • OneClayBead

    OneClayBead from OneClayBead said 6 years ago

    I love reading young minds who see opportunity in the intersection of business and social values. Only in this way can human culture survive on the planet in the long term. Kudos!

  • H88255

    H88255 from HillarysSuperfoods said 6 years ago

    Resourcefulness and creativity is the hear of change!

  • AntoinettesWhims

    Antoinette from AntoinettesWhims said 6 years ago

    I don't know why these seem to be new or foreign concepts. It's the way our grandparents and great grandparents lived everyday during the depression and through World War II.

  • alangood

    alangood said 6 years ago

    Wonderful blog, Karen! Dale Dougherty is doing great things for the DIY community, and not just the handmade or crafts-oriented DIYers. Designing and fabricating an object using 3D printing technology is yet another way of leaving the "dark side" of pure consumerism and becoming a maker!

  • blainedesign

    Karen Brown from blainedesign said 6 years ago

    Make also has an education department. They helped a student who had contacted me with an idea for a grater that could grate bar soap as an alternative to using liquid soap. The student had done an analysis on the environmental impact of shipping liquid soap –– which is mostly water –– vs bar soap, and analyzed which soaps were the safest for humans and water systems. Make was very supportive with ideas on how she could manufacture a prototype.

  • cutiehandmade

    cutiehandmade from cutiehandmade said 6 years ago

    Loved the article! I grew up with my parents making things and altering used items. Once you start creating things of your own you not only find joy and inspiration, but also a unity with family, friends, and the community.

  • SusanFaye

    Susan Faye from SusanFayePetProjects said 6 years ago

    Yes! Let's restore resourcefulness as a middle class virtue! My parents were young children during the Depression when resourcefulness was a necessity. Thanks to them, As a result, I grew up in a home that was resource-conscious long before it became popular and I could sew, garden, knit, paint, bake, and paint before I was 8. It was considered "old-fashioned" back then; I'm so happy to see the recent resurgence of creative resourcefulness in venues like MAKE and Etsy!!

  • INeedAStitch

    Katy from INeedAStitch said 6 years ago

    great interview- thanks for posting!

  • KMalinka

    Natalia from KMalinkaVintage said 6 years ago

    Awesome article!

  • brokenasphalt

    Chris from brokenasphalt said 6 years ago

    Great article. Thanks for sharing.

  • funnydays

    funnydays from funnydays said 6 years ago

    Interesting!

  • ChristineShmistine

    Christine from FineArtWithaTwist said 6 years ago

    that cup... Ick!

  • LoveButtons

    Julia K Walton from FireHorseVintageHQ said 6 years ago

    Interesting article :)

  • PruAtelier

    Jeanne B from PruAtelier said 6 years ago

    Great interview! While it is everyone into the mix, not just the middle class that are "making" today, I feel that the schools should never have abandoned the sewing class, the cooking class, the shop classes....these were classes that nurtured creativity and sadly generations of students never had a connection or exposure to the creative arts unless they were exposed either in an urban atmosphere or by curiosity and self exploration. I also dislike the term "consumer" as coined years ago to group the buying public into nothing more than a "mass"....we are all individuals and "customers" each with our own tastes, etc. It's also great how not unlike the Depression era of "recycling" and handing down, in modern years it has become a very creative art form! I must also say that I take offense to your choice of that "Ecce Homo Fresco" "restoration" piece....it was hideously offensive when I first read the news of it and it remains so for me!

  • formandfunktion

    Stacy from formandfunktion said 6 years ago Featured

    Dale Dougherty is one of my local heroes and the Maker Movement is one of the things happening now that makes me think the world is going to be alright. I so agree with the idea that making creates community - just look at us here!

  • handmaid4theLord

    Julie Lutz from rosarybraceletwrap5 said 6 years ago

    I love how Dale highlights and links the way society has treated the "consumer" and really focused on personalizing what we shop for and create to be life giving!

  • lovelygifts

    Linda from lovelygifts said 6 years ago

    Great article!

  • cocolitaboutique

    Marie-Claude from CocolitaBoutique said 6 years ago

    Great article! I will have to read this MAKE magazine. The DIY vs easy consumption is definitely something we all have to think about these days. People work crazy hours and they don't have time or don't take the time to do DIY. On the other hand everyone is searching for ways to entertain themselves on weekends... DIY should be a new way of spending time with the family and use everyone's creativity! :)

  • annaf5678

    Anna from ALFAdesigns said 6 years ago

    I was using O'Reilly books on programming languages for many years, and always enjoined their creative, clear, and "different" approach. The Makers movement at first seems like a turn in a totally different direction, but is, in fact, the continuation of the same creative DIY approach that was so special about O'Reilly books. I wonder what new and exciting roads will Dale take next!

  • TheMillineryShop

    Marcia Lacher from TheMillineryShop said 6 years ago

    It's so important that makers create things meant to last; it upsets me to see throw-away items. For every thing I make, I hear a story, (albeit in my head) that last well into the future. I can easily dream of someone not yet born opening a box, possible on the other side of the world, to find the heirlooms that we are making today. We are thus able to blend past, present and future in a way our parents and grandparents could never have imagined. How cool is that?.

  • earleneleslie

    Earlene Leslie from Leslieof96 said 6 years ago

    I am just starting to set up my shop. My problem, I am unable to get my photo on my shop. Help please!!!

  • JenMcLamb

    Jennifer Stephenson McLamb from JenMcLamb said 6 years ago

    Thanks for this inspiring interview. I love the connection between making and ecology - that is a huge part of the passion driving my jewelry line!

  • miriammcgowan

    miriam from MizMiriam said 6 years ago

    i love what you are saying and doing both of you and will do my small part in supporting you thankyou

  • shayneshopson

    Sandy Hopson from LittleShopofPop said 6 years ago

    Love it!!!!! Shop Little Shop of POP!!!!!!!

  • shayneshopson

    Sandy Hopson from LittleShopofPop said 6 years ago

    Great!!!!!!!!!

  • sukran

    Sukran Kirtis from SukranKirtisJewelry said 6 years ago

    What an interesting interview, very creative, great to know about him Thanks for sharing

  • MiiniMoh

    Melody from MiiniMoh said 6 years ago

    Interesting interview. LOVE Make magazine!

  • lkmccray

    Linzee from lkmccray said 6 years ago

    As a lover of print, I was heartened by Dale's comments about creating Make in the same trim size as Popular Science and Popular Mechanics. I love to think of an era when people had the time (or made the time) to peruse these publications, have their imagination piqued by an intriguing idea or project, then head down to their basement workshop to create it themselves. So different from the way many of us spend our "free time" today. This interview is wonderful on so many levels. Thank you, Karen!

  • revivalbancroft

    Moxie and Suzy from RevivalVintageStudio said 6 years ago

    MAKE- share-love- inspire, community. That's what I take away from this. This IS why people make things. Why more and more people are going back to garden fresh, cooking, crafts, folks art...it's truly an exciting time. I feel like our consumer culture is turning a direction. A direction toward the "real deal" ethical, and eco. SO GOOD! Thanks for this article...:)

  • redgarage

    redgarage from RedGarage said 6 years ago

    This is a special time I believe, there seems to be a rebirth of self reliance that's taking hold and people like Rob,Karen and Dale have really helped a lot of people bring there ideas to fruition. Thanks for the great read.

  • aressa

    aressa from OriginalBridalHanger said 6 years ago

    Pretty neat!

  • blainedesign

    Karen Brown from blainedesign said 6 years ago

    Yes, Linzee, I think it was bold of Make to publish a print magazine. But as you say, it really fits. The print format says to me that they took a stand from the outset that Make is sharing a tangible, physical, "real" world, and not just a digital representation of one.

  • LuluDeux

    Katie from LuluDeuxMillinery said 6 years ago

    I was in one of the last classes of my high school that offered Home Ec, and if I didn't have that exposure back then, I wouldn't be doing what I love today. Luckily, there is such a huge movement now to learn these arts and thanks to the Internet, people can explore these skills that are so often not offered in school any longer. I love going to Maker Faire and just seeing the excitement and possibilities, even in mediums I know nothing about. The enthusiasm is contagious.

  • gibson850

    Susan Gibson from SueBelles said 6 years ago

    I remember when I was little I had such a desire to learn to do it myself. I was not the normal of my local time. I researched, took what classes I could and kept trying. I have made so many things and given so many things to enrich others. I hope they will enjoy them for years to come. Now with the digital world and so many talented and inspiring people we can feel we are not alone and it encourages others to start something new to warm their inner self and keep the cycle going. The only problem now is I want to learn so much more and time seems to get shorter and shorter as I get older and older. Enjoy your craft as long as you can. Sharing is the real key to meeting friends.

  • metalicious

    Stephanie Maslow Blackman from metalicious said 6 years ago

    Great article! We take our boys to the Maker Faire every year. Building is a part of our family culture, everything from cardboard 'race cars' to tiny bristle bots. I love the adventure of creating with my kids, and passing on the DIY mindset. John Park is my son's idol!

  • oraconcepts

    Karin Lindroth from oraconcepts said 6 years ago

    I really like this article! It makes sense that the world is moving away from allowing mass production to destroy our planet. Imagine a world where even people in the third world could sell their hand made items directly to their own costumers...something to think about. Good work for paving the way!

  • allstarorganics

    allstarorganics from allstarorganics said 6 years ago

    "If somebody says to me says that I should be a good consumer, I feel deflated, I feel like you are treating me like dirt, and underestimating who I am and what I can do." Consumer culture is a reason many people feel powerless and "deflated," as Dale says. because when you consume you can only select from the choices someone else has already made for you. No wonder we have so much waste –– there is virtually no brilliance or love in mass production. If my purpose on earth is to buy someone else's products there is no way for me to express my true preferences or better ideas, that is, unless I make things myself. Then suddenly it becomes joyous again. Thank you for this interview. Dale has been a contributor of big ideas for a long time and it is wonderful to see him on Etsy.

  • takeapicturedesigns

    Lynne from RiverSpring said 6 years ago

    Thanks for this great article. Who would have thought that someone like me could have her cards sold around the world when previously they went to such a small circle of family and friends? Share the love, from Lynne

  • gwinia

    gwinia from gwinia said 6 years ago

    I think it is the Coolest thing since Sliced Bread, All these People Hand- Making Items from cups to clothes to jewelry to wooden creations and You Just Name It : ETSY HAS IT and the CREATORS OF IT !! Wow! How Marvelous is that?? In a World of Such Fast Living and Fast Everything~ It is such a Pleasure to have These ARTISTS making HANDMADE ITEMS!! Here You can See it,Ponder it, Read about it,Learn about it, Love it and BUY it !! Etsy is like a Giant Store full of Everything You could ever Want to Buy or Sell in a Giant Mall full of Wonderful Talented Artists that Never Stop Designing and Creating!! All Just for You and for the Love of Creating!! Loved the Article!! It was Fantastic and it encouraged Me to write this!! : ) You can see from the Interview that People are going back to Creating and Making so many handmade things! It is An ExcitingThing to see this and the Closeness of the People in the Etsy Community!! It's Great to be a Part of It! Thank You for the Wonderful Article!!

  • piecestodressby

    Joy from piecestodressby said 6 years ago

    Right on target and straight from the heart. The juxtaposition of heart, love, caring, creativity and love while building an awesome community is timeless. Looking forward to hearing and learning more as it is exactly my point-of-view. Thank you, thank you, thank you !!!!!

  • dawnMaeR

    dawna rubihid from lepetitchatrobin said 6 years ago

    Great interview!

  • livesmira

    livesmira from SEVILSBAZAAR said 6 years ago

    Very nice..

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