The Etsy Blog

The New DIY Movement for Kids

Etsy.com handmade and vintage goods

calebgardner

Given how much I’ve written about the importance of creativity for children, I’ve been surprised and happy about the recent appearance of new sites for children dedicated to the pursuit of active creativity: getting kids off the couch to make things. Encouraging kids to do more with their hands than play video games is important, and finding activities for them to do just got much easier.

The first site I’ve had my eye on is called Built by Kids, which is a deep well of DIY projects for parents looking to build a dollhouse or plant a garden with their kids over a weekend. Kids can also submit their own “Built by You” projects each month to be featured on the homepage and the chance to earn prizes from sponsors. The “Tool School” is also a great resource for helping kids understand different tools available to them, and provides a foundational craftsmanship education that they can use throughout their lives.

The founders claim that by “teaching children practical skills and encouraging them to submit to their creativity, children become more confident, capable and cosmopolitan.” I agree, and I would definitely suggest that any parent looking for collaborative, hands-on activities to do with their kids to dive into all that Built by Kids has to offer. I for one will be checking out the universal construction kit that will be handy for my three-year-old.

A similar site called DIY.org takes the idea one step further by creating an online community for kids to share their own projects with other kids in a completely safe, anonymous setting that parents can monitor. The kids get their own “portfolios” to show off what they make and can earn stickers for completing certain projects. There is even integration with a pretty impressive iPhone/iPod touch app.

DIY.org has gotten a good amount of press lately for its focus on activity instead of passive participation. In the New York Times, co-founder Isaiah Saxon is quoted describing most social networks as being “about what you like, not what you do… We want to create an experience for children that’s about what you make, and in turn makes these skills heroic.”

His comment about heroism reminded me of when The Dangerous Book for Boys and The Daring Book for Girls made a splash with their publication a few years ago. The concepts within were so simple (learning how to fish, read a compass, and tie knots, for example), but they were radical in their simplicity. They stirred within parents a nostalgia for the days of youth before iPads and Kinects. Before alternate childhood dimensions.

Given that my son is just getting old enough to participate in hands-on building projects like this, I’m curious about how other parents have intentionally integrated this kind of activity into their lives (or not). What do you think? Is this new movement a good thing, or are these new websites another result of over-involved parents? Do you make it a point to do hands-on projects with your kids?

Caleb Gardner is an amateur father and husband who writes at The Exceptional Man and dabbles in photography, design, and music. When listening to the cacophony of modern-day America, Caleb prefers a side of Scotch. He calls Chicago home, and in winter, less-nice things.

4 Featured Comments

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  • guziks

    Stephanie from Phylogeny says: Featured

    I think these child-oriented DIY sites are going to be a wonderful way for parents and their children to connect on a new level. It's great to go throw a ball around on the front yard, but it's just as memorable and fun to make a project together. I always cherished my projects with my grandmother, and now my mother is doing them for her grandkids. These new sites will only help guide that process and will hopefully bring some other parents into the mix of what it means to be handmade.

    3 years ago

  • everythingok

    everythingok from everythingok says: Featured

    This is totally awesome. I was always driven to create stuff when I was little and I sort of wish I'd had more encouragement and resources, really.

    3 years ago

  • Krystyna81

    Kristina from Krystyna81 says: Featured

    Any site that encourages creativity is good. But we have to remember to lead by example, always. The computer should be a tool - helping us get ideas or inspiration, but not a substitute for hands-on creativity.

    3 years ago

  • JoshandTeo

    Jenny from JoshandTeo says: Featured

    Great post! It's so important to get your kids involved. It keeps them engaged and it's good for bonding. My 1 and 3 year old watch what I do for my ETSY shop and I also let them help where they can. We spend a lot of time building things out of lego (superheroes, castles, forts, etc.) and it's amazing how they always come back to the lego. Doesn't matter how many expensive toys they get... it's always the lego because it allows them to be creative. I am book marking the site. Thanks again!

    3 years ago

  • KMalinka

    Natalia from KMalinkaVintage says:

    Awesome! Very creative!

    3 years ago

  • TheLittlestFairy

    TheLittlestFairy from TheLittlestFairy says:

    Love this!! My daughter is 3 and always wants to "do a project" with me. Soo great to see others are enthusiastic about getting their kids to be creative and hands-on. Thank you for the blog!

    3 years ago

  • StringBeardCraftery

    Stephanie from StringBeardCraftery says:

    YES! I love to babysit the nieces and cousins and when I do, we have so much fun creating. I think children should learn the importance of DIY and handmade as soon as possible!!!

    3 years ago

  • peshka

    Peshka from Peshka says:

    Cute!!

    3 years ago

  • ZinniaSnipSnap

    Marley from QUIVERreclaimed says:

    This is a great idea-I will have to check out these sites for my daughter!

    3 years ago

  • UpsideDownFrowns

    UpsideDownFrowns from UpsideDownFrowns says:

    I can't wait until my baby girl is old enough for ART days!

    3 years ago

  • UpsideDownFrowns

    UpsideDownFrowns from UpsideDownFrowns says:

    I can't wait until my baby girl is old enough that we can make stuff together. We are already painting. kinda;)

    3 years ago

  • flaviabennett

    Flavia Bennett from flaviabennettdesigns says:

    When I was a nanny in college, I'd always do arts and crafts projects with the kids. We would make bracelets, masks, masking tape houses, decorate t shirts, make decorations for the Christmas tree (or Hanukkah bush as they called it), and off course the countless watercolor paintings. Now I have my own kid and I can't wait till his old enough to make all those projects. Right now I am just saving all my favorite projects on Pinterest (amazing source of ideas too) and waiting for him to stop eating the crayons!

    3 years ago

  • mazedasastoat

    mazedasastoat from mazedasastoat says:

    I would have thought that any parents that make things themselves wouldn't need to encourage their kids to be makers via a website. I know I learned everything from crochet to furniture building from family members trying to occupy me while they were busy making, rather than from some kind of artificial situation. Being involved in things meant I couldn't help but learn, but if I hadn't wanted to then I don't think an interactive website would have been much use.

    3 years ago

  • guziks

    Stephanie from Phylogeny says: Featured

    I think these child-oriented DIY sites are going to be a wonderful way for parents and their children to connect on a new level. It's great to go throw a ball around on the front yard, but it's just as memorable and fun to make a project together. I always cherished my projects with my grandmother, and now my mother is doing them for her grandkids. These new sites will only help guide that process and will hopefully bring some other parents into the mix of what it means to be handmade.

    3 years ago

  • TheBerryPress

    Wendy Hogue Berry from TheBerryPress says:

    Thank you. I have some creative boys and will be checking out all the sites. My mother taught us the value of making things when you could and to this day making things with my mom and siblings are some of my best memories.

    3 years ago

  • MarilynsMedley

    Marilyn D from MarilynsMedley says:

    I think anything to start up an artistic spark in kids is a great idea. I started my granddaughter with beadweaving jewelry and she picked it up quick. We are putting her bracelets in our upcoming craft fairs this year. She is very excited and will be helping in our booth.

    3 years ago

  • thevicagirl

    VaLon Frandsen from thevicagirl says:

    That's how I started with my crafting, is doing it as a child. I loved making things, as did everyone I was around. It is cool that now we had so much on the internet to look for for children now. So cool.

    3 years ago

  • YollaKlea

    Yolla and Klea from YollaKlea says:

    Thanks for such helpful links! I am sure that I could find interesting projects for my son.

    3 years ago

  • KettleConfections

    KettleConfections from KettleConfections says:

    Really glad to see that the DIY trend is catching on to children as well. The internet was originally built to share information on making discoveries and accomplishing something, not consumption as many websites to driven to do in their attempt to court advertisers.

    3 years ago

  • everythingok

    everythingok from everythingok says: Featured

    This is totally awesome. I was always driven to create stuff when I was little and I sort of wish I'd had more encouragement and resources, really.

    3 years ago

  • Krystyna81

    Kristina from Krystyna81 says: Featured

    Any site that encourages creativity is good. But we have to remember to lead by example, always. The computer should be a tool - helping us get ideas or inspiration, but not a substitute for hands-on creativity.

    3 years ago

  • valmann

    Valerie Mann from valmann says:

    Great idea. I would just encourage parents to not be attached to any specific outcome, especially at first, or making stuff together could be painful. And w/really small kids (5 and under) have a set time limit, or pay attention to their engagement level. Again, to avoid a possible backfire. This could make kids' craft fairs not suck and parents will realize if they give the kids some good tools, guidance and materials they will blow their minds....and they will actually be proud of their own stuff and eager to buy others' work. Check out the Kids' Art Fair in Ann Arbor for cool ideas about how to complete the circle of commerce for your kids and their DIY stuff. This "making of stuff" is essential - I have actually taught high-schoolers who didn't know how to use scissors. DON'T LET THIS HAPPEN TO ANYONE YOU KNOW!

    3 years ago

  • Pastecchi

    Pastecchi from TheAmazonBazaar says:

    I love this concept! I am always trying to get my son involved in making things with his hands. It is such an important concept. It gives a child a sense of ownership and confidence...you know pride of what they can achieve and create. It may sound silly, but when I cook or make my own juice, he helps me ,he is 3 1/2. Its important that he understands how a meal is prepared and how to turn whole fruits into juice..its magic! lol This year we started our first garden. I love sharing these kinds of things with my son, he will appriecate things more...i hope! And its great bonding time :)

    3 years ago

  • pogoshop

    pogoshop from pogoshop says:

    When I taught first grade, we kept large junk boxes in the classroom. The children would bring in yogurt containers, paper towel tubes, broken clocks, plastic bottles, miss-matched gloves... any cast-outs their parents would give them. These were the sources of many great rainy-day recess creations. The children loved building and making more than any activity we ever did and would have happily worked all day with these recycled treasures. They were so empowered by having materials at hand and time to let their amazing young minds run free.

    3 years ago

  • ladiesngents

    Tricia Vasinda from ladiesngents says:

    I am so excited to share these sites with my kids! I have 3 boys (age 8,7,5) and 1 girl (age 3), and there is always some kind of project going on. Some things I have done to encourage their creative play/learning is to always have basic supplies available to them. All recyclables that can be used safely (ie: cardboard boxes, plastic bottles) are placed in a bin they have access to. I have a creation station which has buckets of crayons, colored and regular pencil, pencil sharpeners, safety scissors, tapes, glue sticks, paper and a scrap bin for scrap fabric, paper, ribbons, etc. (the scissors and glue are placed where the younger ones cannot reach them, and I have also learned not to have markers as accessible with the littles around either, haha!) This has certainly encouraged them to create since they don't have to wait for me to get things or ask permission to use scraps, since if it is in the bin, it is useable. We are always collecting things when we are outdoors to use in our projects, too. We also keep mostly imaginative/creative toys around- blocks, Legos, knex, dolls, etc. We play a lot of games when we are waiting places to encourage looking at things differently. A fav is to take an object and everyone has to come up with another idea of what it is- a bucket becomes a hat, chair, steering wheel, drum and so on until we run out of ideas, then we move onto another object!

    3 years ago

  • MegansMenagerie

    Megan from MegansMenagerie says:

    My 7 year old and I are constantly making things! She is so creative and I think since I am always working on some kind of project she always wants to help which drives her creativity even more!

    3 years ago

  • hmmills

    Helen Mills from 1820BagCo says:

    Great read, will have to share with my nephew.

    3 years ago

  • studiorandom

    Dana Seilhan from studiorandom says:

    I feel sorry for anyone who'd see this as a symptom of parental overinvolvement. It is our JOB to teach our children the skills of adulthood--and, unless one equates learned helplessness with adulthood, knowing how to make things with your own two hands definitely counts as one (or a group) of those skills.

    3 years ago

  • dloustalot

    Danielle Loustalot from SomethingFromTheSun says:

    This is a great post! I love that more and more people are beginning to feel that children need to have more opportunities to be much more hands-on and creative. I am personally not a parent, but I spend significant amounts of time with my boyfriend's daughter, who is 2 1/2. Thankfully, she is a bundle of energy and our weekends are spent running around with her all day. People wonder how I don't get a break, and it's because Brailey doesn't like to sit down and watch television or play with my iPhone. It's always "let's go on a walk with my baby," or "chase me daddy!" or "let's make cookies." I treasure her desires to be active, like little kids should :) I can't wait until she's old enough for me to do projects and crafts with her...that's what I lived for when I was little!

    3 years ago

  • mimishingleton

    Mimi from aTreasureInStore says:

    Great article. I think it is extremely important to do these things with young children..and young parents should realize that the "window" closes sooner than you think...if you don't engage them before they are teens, they get those car keys and....girl/boy friends...and jobs....

    3 years ago

  • OmeeBubu

    Omee Bubu from OmeesBoutique says:

    Thanks, loved the article!

    3 years ago

  • jillmarshall

    Jill Marshall from PreppyPiecesHairTies says:

    Love this article. My 13 year old daughter is in the kitchen right now making cake pops. She's even cleaning up after herself! Priceless!

    3 years ago

  • RoxiSimpleStrings

    Roxann McArthur from RoxiSimpleStrings says:

    nurturing creativity, love it! Of course Etsy is building a generation of these kids

    3 years ago

  • slathered

    Sharon Moores from slathered says:

    There's no problem that a cheap T-shirt and some fabric pens can't take care of. I'm thrilled that my child has an artistic bent. We love making things together. And the time we spend in Michaels or out in the yard scavenging pine cones for supplies is just as fun as the time spent making crafts out of them.

    3 years ago

  • CarpetShopPrincess

    Katie Koshy from carpetshopprincess says:

    I love the idea of teaching children to DIY. I was taught as a kid, and I think I turned out just fine. A rule when we visited my Nana was that if we wanted to watch the 'Boob Tube,' we had to be doing something productive as well. She taught us a whole host of crafts. My sister and I embroidered some tea towels, and my brother watched so much TV one summer, that he made a quilt.

    3 years ago

  • Musclesandcrafts

    Melanie from merVazi says:

    My daughter, who is 7, has already silk screened a tshirt for herself, designed several for me to make for her, and draws constantly. She figures she is going to be an artist when she grows up, and I never discourage her artistic outlets.

    3 years ago

  • rarebeasts

    Brian McNamara from rarebeasts says:

    I think the DIY web sites for kids are great. My kids are always doing projects anyway, I've just got to keep the materials coming.

    3 years ago

  • theshack

    Alex Trumble from theshack says:

    Thanks for the info.

    3 years ago

  • LivingVintage

    LivingVintage from LivingVintage says:

    I think it works up to a certain age for boys, and then all bets are off.

    3 years ago

  • EbonyButterfly

    Wanett from SownBKLYN says:

    I think this is great!! I have four kiddies to keep busy and as they always see me working on projects, photographing them and posting them to blogs and other online communities I think they would enjoy doing the same.

    3 years ago

  • Iammie

    iammie from iammie says:

    DIY is a great way to free their imagination! :)

    3 years ago

  • littlemissloolies

    Sarah Hepworth from littlemissloolies says:

    Setting aside some time for you kids to help them get stuck-in and show you what they are capable of, is such an important part of encouraging them and allowing them to develop their own decision-making skills, self confidence, creativity and co ordination, as well as passing on the practical essentials of making for yourself. I think the key is ring-fencing enough time for that one on one co operative play and learning and making it regularly accessible to kids so they know they have time to practice and develop the skills they want to master to become 'crafters and makers' in their own right. If an online project supports and encourages that it can only be a good thing in combination with a real hands-on teacher. I think one of the most important things about making for yourself is the lessons it teaches about the real value of things. That's so important to reinforce in todays world where kids are constantly marketed to and conditioned by the media. The projects and gifts they spend time and effort doing/making for others are so much more fun and meaningful to share than anything they could buy in a store.

    3 years ago

  • JoshandTeo

    Jenny from JoshandTeo says: Featured

    Great post! It's so important to get your kids involved. It keeps them engaged and it's good for bonding. My 1 and 3 year old watch what I do for my ETSY shop and I also let them help where they can. We spend a lot of time building things out of lego (superheroes, castles, forts, etc.) and it's amazing how they always come back to the lego. Doesn't matter how many expensive toys they get... it's always the lego because it allows them to be creative. I am book marking the site. Thanks again!

    3 years ago

  • coalchild

    coalchild from coalchild says:

    involving children in any creative endevor pays for itself just to watch those thinking faces, intense concentration and not to mention the payoff in the end of a completed ....project. I carved soap figures as a child so mom just bought extra ivory..my daughter was forever creating ,painting etc and now does craft projects with her kids...someday when their old enough i hope to introduce them to stained glass and see if it sticks...lets be enablers and show our children they can do just about anything as long as they keep an open mind...great post thx

    3 years ago

  • exnomad

    pierce and colleen from exnomad says:

    time to break out the finger paints!

    3 years ago

  • spiderbunny

    Jessa Cady from Spiderbunny says:

    Great post! I'm glad that kids have such great resources ^ . ^

    3 years ago

  • LilyThreads

    Mary from LilyThreads says:

    This is my daughters shop:) She's 12 and does ALL of the work (I can't sew)! Love the article!

    3 years ago

  • mattyhandmadecrafts

    Matejka Max from NattyMatty says:

    Great article!

    3 years ago

  • eileenkeay

    Eileen Keay from ComfyZone says:

    This is soooooo....creative!!!! The best ever for kids!!!!

    3 years ago

  • stinnovation

    ST Innovation from stinnovation says:

    beatific kid, lol very beautiful design and great creative, I love those logo on the kid T-shirt.

    3 years ago

  • OncleHope

    Oncle Hope from OncleHope says:

    Super! I had not idea about DIY.org. My son is rarely infront of screens but when he is I would prefer it being something like this. And i cant deny we are int the era of internet / information etc etc and kids will be exposed to it sooner or later so rather being exposed good and wise! Good idea - really! And those books - fun!

    3 years ago

  • MissHildebrandt

    Hildebrandt from MissHildebrandt says:

    I have a little son and always looking for creative fun and education. Very happy to have noted the above websites. We shall check them out today possibly.

    3 years ago

  • inkOVERpaperInvites

    Alicia Markey from inkOVERpaperInvites says:

    Thanks for sharing these resources! I am really excited to get my little one involved.

    3 years ago

  • sukran

    Sukran Kirtis from SukranKirtisJewelry says:

    I would love to try with my little boy as well.Thanks for sharing

    3 years ago

  • MagpieQuilts

    Ann from MagpieQuilts says:

    I don't think every creative activity needs to have structure and an end result in mind. I have supplies readily available for when my grandkids come over and it's fun to see what they come up with out of their own imagination. Caons, paints, scissors, glue, paper, old magazines, fabric pieces, bubble wrap, etc. can all be found in my supply box. When they show interest in a tool, they are shown how it works and if they are old enough to use it safely, they are encouraged to do that to. My parenting motto was "find a way to say YES more often than NO".

    3 years ago

  • MagpieQuilts

    Ann from MagpieQuilts says:

    **caons=crayons

    3 years ago

  • TheEverlastingPosy

    TheEverlastingPosy from TheEverlastingPosy says:

    These sound like great sites!

    3 years ago

  • everythingexist

    Gabriela from everythingexist says:

    Great idea !

    3 years ago

  • LittleWrenPottery

    Victoria Baker from LittleWrenPottery says:

    I really love the Mini Eco site she has so many great craft projects for kids and recently launched a book - http://www.minieco.co.uk/

    3 years ago

  • isewcute

    June from isewcute says:

    My kids love to make things, so I'll have to check these out for more ideas to keep the creativity blooming in them.

    3 years ago

  • ArtsyFlair

    Michaela Bowles from ArtsyFlair says:

    Awesome! :)

    3 years ago

  • kittenkong

    Susie Redfern from kittenkong says:

    This is a great article and I'll be sure to check out those sites - thanks! Don't know whether advertising fridge magnets are popular elsewhere but they seem to arrive in letterboxes un-solicited every week here in Sydney. Today we made... well my 5 year old made her own fridge magnets by stripping off the ads and sticking her own tiny drawings on the magnets instead - so cute!

    3 years ago

  • darumpf

    Daniela Rumpf from UphamStreetPottery says:

    I always did projects with my parents and that was 20+ years ago. I remember working on the car with my dad, making Femo ornaments with my mom and helping my grandpa in the garden. The comment I get now is often "How do you know how to do all these things." I think being involved in hands-on projects gives kids a sense of a "can-do" attitude. I've never been afraid to tackle something I have never done before. I just know I'll figure it out somehow. I would want my kids to feel that way about their ability and creativity, too.

    3 years ago

  • weatheredsilo

    Mandy Behrens from weatheredsilo says:

    B R A V O! Thank you for sharing your thoughts and resources. Looking forward to exploring these activities with my 10 and 9-year old daughters soon. Cheers, Mandy

    3 years ago

  • Jessiflowers

    Jessica Flowers from sittinprettykids says:

    I love this post. I have checked out the site you suggested and I LOVE THEM. Thanks so much Jessi

    3 years ago

  • elleburnette

    Danielle Burnette from ErielleDesigns says:

    Having had my sons in boy scouts, lots of these DIY things are done in that environment, so when the oldest received the Dangerous Book for Boys, he kind of rolled his eyes....."Mom, I already know all that stuff.' Our girls often follow me around when I am working on projects, or participate in someway, and now my 11 y/o is making jewelry and knows how to mud over a hole in the wall. I honestly think that not having tv contributed to this, cause they could either DO SOMETHING or sit and do nothing.

    3 years ago

  • silverlily786

    Fatema from SilverLilyJewelry says:

    Having 3 Boy's aged 10,6 and 1 who are very kineccted with their kinect,wii psp (not the one year old) has me constantly lecturing them 'when I was your age my mom would yell to get me back in the house" living in an apartment doesn't help get them get creative or out door's I think sites like these are beneficial and not a result of over involved parent's unfortunately in these technological times we have to get involved to get our kid's out and about and using their hand's and imagination's in an organic (not electronically stimulated) way.

    3 years ago

  • TheBeautyofBoredom

    Gracie from TheBeautyofBoredom says:

    That's kind of a cool thing for kids, although I am not sure that if I were to have kids I would direct them to the site. I would not ant my kids to become obsessed with the internet. XD I think a fair amount of the day should be focused on other things, crafts should be included too, but they shouldn't be on the internet too terribly much, especially when they are very young. We'll see, but I would definitely prefer just taking them to an art class or doing crafts with other local kids so it would be just as interactive, but not on the internet.

    3 years ago

  • childsmindinnovation

    Monika Conway says:

    Great article. Children are indeed built to be little creators. As parents we just need to recognize how to nurture this inherent skill and set them free. We can provide them with the tools, resources, opportunities and most importantly free time to create. Parents can be great collaborators and guiding the way as role models. I believe it's the creative process that's more important for kids than the results of a creative endeavor. Anything they make will motivate them and help them feel more creative too. There are a lot of great websites and apps out there that nurture their creativity too which means it's always going to be a balancing act of play indoor, outdoor, online and offline. I've been blogging about nurturing creativity too: http://childsmindinnovation.tumblr.com/

    3 years ago

  • ckarigan

    claudia karigan from YourFinalTouch says:

    I think these child DIY sites are going to be a wonderful way for parents and their children to connect. My son is like me, loves to make things!These sites will be great for us to find project that we to do together.

    3 years ago

  • ansluasi

    ansluasi from OnceUponABookshop says:

    I grew up with two very DIY parents, and have glorious memories filled with glue, sawdust, paints, fabrics and untold other delights. They were very conscious about making me part of their projects, and about providing me with tools and lots of materials to create with myself. Now I am the mom to an imaginative 4 year old girl, and it is pure joy to see her mind at work when she approaches a project. My house might be a wee bit overflowing with glitter, pompoms, felt, paper scraps and rather lopsided masterpieces, but I am raising an independent child that knows the sense of accomplishment that personal creation brings. I sell vintage kids books, and it is always fun to look through titles of kids DIY project books from yesteryear. A lot of them would set modern helicopter parents' teeth on edge: they involve hammers, saws, whittling knives and other dangerous tools. And I think that this is something that we adults need to realize: while we must always provide adequate training, sturdy tools and proper guidance, we do need to step back and let our kids take age appropriate risks. Read Andrew Henry's Meadow and Why I Built The Boogle House for some glorious examples.

    3 years ago

  • shabbyshades1

    Julie W from pbteen says:

    great love the kids ideas and diy aspect

    3 years ago

  • ansluasi

    ansluasi from OnceUponABookshop says:

    Etsy has some awesome vintage DIY idea books for kids, I put some of them together in a treasury here: http://www.etsy.com/treasury/OTQ3MzIyNHwyNzIyOTI4OTU0/diy-kids?index=1

    3 years ago

  • robertcoffin
  • lcarlsonjewelry

    Liesl Carlson from lcarlsonjewelry says:

    My son is three is loves to create. Anything! When I moved my studio he asked for his own bench, which he has now! All kids should learn to create with their hands and is should be encouraged.

    3 years ago

  • HoneyBeeHolistics

    Melissa from HoneyBeeHolistics says:

    Yes, I agree! My daughter is 2 years old now and has her own monogramed apron she puts on when I put MY apron on! She says, "Help Mommy!" I love it! She mimics me using the mortar & pestle and stirring ingredients......even though she is just stirring water now at this stage! Kids want to learn....We just have to take every opportunity to teach them what they need to know every day! There are opportunities EVERYWHERE all of the time...That is how kids learn☺

    3 years ago

  • sandboxcastle

    H Wang from sandboxcastle says:

    OMG - I wish I had these sites as a kid!!! I was always looking for ideas on stuff I could make myself ( I got pretty creative with paper and cardboard doll houses!) but back then there was no internet and almost all crafts required my parents to go out and buy something first! This is awesome! Thanks for sharing these resources!

    3 years ago

  • PeaceofStoneStudio

    Michelle Emry from PeaceofStoneStudio says:

    So awesome! Creativity is so important for children! I am studying to be an art therapist, DIY, arts and crafts, and other arts can be so healing! Thanks for sharing!!!

    3 years ago

  • ezemelman

    Elizabeth Zemelman from JadoraDesigns says:

    I lOVE Art days with my kiddies. Thanks for sharing!

    3 years ago

  • paulfiorello

    Paul Fiorello from DancingMoonLLC says:

    I always encouraged my daughters to be creative and make something. My middle daughter is now able to do construction woks and landscaping design

    3 years ago

  • wonderlaneart

    Missy Anne from wonderlaneart says:

    It is an amazing thing to see what a child can do with the ordinary! Their fresh minds and active imaginations are teaming with ideas if we as parents can give the them the resources and guidance that they crave. I love to see new sites cater towards being active and creative! Children are only children for so long and what a great way to let them really live it!

    3 years ago

  • MakeABasket

    MakeABasket from MakeABasket says:

    creation processes are so important, i think, in learning how to learn. It is not enough to be told what to do and how to do it. If we all learned how to figure things out for ourselves as children, i think we could all figure out our lives better as adults. someone with skill in many areas of craft is an adaptable, responsive, clever person. This is not something everyone is born with. But i think it is something anyone can learn, and it is what i consider an essential life skill. thanks for the pointers, i can't wait to check out the sites!

    3 years ago

  • CharlotteHandmade

    Charlotte Ann from LovelyClothNapkins says:

    Fun post! So important to create, cook, picnic and be active with our children. They are young for such a short time. :)

    3 years ago

  • tonybrandedmojocom

    tonybrandedmojo.com says:

    creativity is the key to knowledge that opens the door to success

    3 years ago

  • liddysopretty

    liddy sopretty from liddysopretty says:

    Engaging children in productive activities...yes! I feared this generation was drowning in stupidity...there is light at the end of the tunnel (that isn't an oncoming train)...ok maybe I'm being a bit dramatic, but seriously...hooray for getting those little minds working! :)

    3 years ago

  • iFeltFanciful

    Tammy Riley from iFeltFanciful says:

    I'm a mom of two makers (now tween & teen). My advice is give them plenty of art supplies and turn 'em loose! The plastic parts you can't recycle and some glue dots can make a memory and fire their brains. Making is a way of looking at the world. You'll pass that on to them by being an example. Our household mantra is: "We can make that!" or, alternately, "fix that". FYI, they may not make like you do....my kids crochet, weave and fold (origami), but no one wants to knit!

    3 years ago

  • sueforey

    Sue Forey from SueForeyfibreart says:

    Never lose hope. I have 3 daughters and encouraged all of them to be creative as children. My eldest is 30 and I'm still waiting, the middle one is 27 and has never stopped creating and the youngest one is 17. I was thinking she would never get interested but in the last week or so she has discovered needle felting! ( i make wet felt). She has been making little dogs. I have one that looks like Snowy and her Dad has one on his desk at work. To my daughters delight one of his colleges asked for one and has paid £5.00 for it. Can I see another Etsy shop in a few years!!!

    3 years ago