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For the Love of Foie Gras

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istelleinad

We recently spent the holidays in France, where the festive meals were day-long affairs beginning with aperitifs and champagne, followed by a three-course meal that always ended with lots of chocolates. Apart from well-aged French wine, we also had our fill of foie gras, as is customary at French Christmas celebrations.

It may not be a taste for every palate, but I’m a staunch fan of this controversial delicacy, particularly when it arrives as a generously sliced, perfectly pan-seared portion, topped with nothing more than a dusting of fleur de sel. Needless to say, I’m more than a little flustered at California’s pending law forbidding the production and sale of foie gras, which takes effect this July.

The proponents of the law argue that foie gras needs to be banned because the “gavage,” or force-feeding of geese and ducks as a method of production, is “inhumane.” While I do not doubt the existence of farms that provide less than ideal conditions for their ducks and geese, I’m puzzled as to why this food item, with more than 45 centuries of history and tradition, is being singled out when other more “inhumane” food choices exist.

Let’s consider the ubiquitous hamburger, that quarter-pound of ground beef made from factory-farmed cows. We are, by now, familiar with the contamination risks inherent in the production of factory-farmed meat. Yet there’s a conspicuous absence of voices to ban this product. Considering its affordability (when compared with pasture-raised, grass-fed beef) and availability in grocery stores across the country, one would think that subjecting the American population to the constant threat of bacterial contamination is more inhumane than seeking to ban the production of a luxury food item like foie gras. And we haven’t even started to discuss the cramped living conditions of the poor cows destined to live in their own manure for the length of their sad, sorry lives.

Don’t eat meat? Well then, let’s take a look at where our fish comes from. Half of the seafood consumed in the U.S. is farmed, and that practice (aquaculture) is growing quickly to keep up with demand, with attendant consequences on the ocean’s health. Aquaculture has been found to rapidly deplete populations of wild fish in order to produce a pound of tuna or salmon and pollute ocean waters with fish waste, which has long-term environmental consequences for the world we live in. And yet there isn’t a peep to be heard about banning farmed salmon or tuna — or banning the practice of aquaculture altogether.

While it’s certainly important to pay attention to the welfare of animals that we depend on for food, there’s also a point where we need to recognize that an animal’s physiology renders it capable of certain physical conditions that would appear “inhumane” to the human experience.

Let me qualify that the notion of force-feeding an animal for food doesn’t sit comfortably with my foodie conscience. However, I’m also aware that part of that discomfort is a result of anthropomorphizing animals reared for consumption. The European Union’s Scientific Committee report about the welfare of ducks and geese involved in foie gras production found a lack of conclusive evidence on the aversive nature of force-feeding and its injurious effects. Wild waterfowl have also been found to produce foie gras after a feeding spree before the winter months. In fact, Eduardo Sousa produces “natural foie gras using this method.

Kevin Lawler

A wall of pork rinds at an American grocery store.

What’s far more inhumane, in my view, is allowing easy access to food that’s produced and consumed in ways that have proven track records of destroying the environment and our health. Where are the bans on soda, high-fructose corn syrup, and factory-farmed animals? Why is it, despite everything we know today, that these food items still tend to be the cheapest, most affordable and accessible food items for those with limited budgets?

The optimists out there may say that I’m over-reacting, and I certainly hope I am. Viewed from an alternate perspective, one could consider this ban as a significant step in the fight against Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs). The idealist in me hopes that this is the case, because when you start to discuss livestock production in “humane/inhumane” terms, no real progress can be made until you talk about the elephant in the room: factory-farmed meat. Banning an expensive specialty food item isn’t going to advance animal welfare, so long as the majority of the population continues to consume (whether by choice or necessity) products that are bad for their health and the environment.

What’s your take?

We remind readers to please remain respectful when contributing to this sensitive discussion.

More Food Posts on the Blog

About the author: Danielle Tsi grew up in Singapore, a tiny, food-obsessed island on the tip of the Malaysian Peninsula, where every waking minute was spent thinking about what her next meal was going to be. Landing in the United States with her well-traveled Nikon, she turned her lifelong love affair with food into images and words on her blog, Beyond the Plate. When not behind the lens or at the stove, Danielle can be found on her yoga mat perfecting the headstand.

11 Featured Comments

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  • MilkyteaPrincess

    MilkyteaPrincess says: Featured

    I really suggest to anyone interested to pick up or borrow a copy of "Eating Animals" by Jonathan Safran Foer and also watch the documentary "Earthlings". I'm sure it streams somewhere free online. These two things are some of the best accounts of the harm the meat, fish, poultry and dairy industries do to us on a global scale. There are many voices out there that want hamburger meat and not only foie gras banned. I like how you put quotes around "inhumane". Do you think that animals don't suffer from being force fed? If I killed a man and someone else kills two, am I suddenly a saint? Comparing any of these things together doesn't seem like a logical argument for foie gras.

    2 years ago

  • littlegoatsoaps

    littlegoatsoaps says: Featured

    I totally agree with the fact that "they" are singling out one issue and IGNORING the others! Foie Gras is consumed by a minority in this country... while NASTY beef, chicken, fish and fill-in-the-blank are consumed on a massive scale!! It seems to me that the ban on Foie Gras is to placate the PETA crowd so they can continue to rake in million of dollars from producing inferior meat and sending it out labeled "safe". Not that i like the idea of exploding geese, but i am much more concerned about what is on the typical grocery shelves that is killing us. That said... we drink raw organic milk (which means i also have cream and butter), buy grass fed beef from a nearby farm and will be stocking up on whole natural chickens from our amish neighbors when the weather warms up. We are all for meat and dairy... just not nasty meat and dairy!

    2 years ago

  • KettleConfections

    KettleConfections says: Featured

    Should the government ban foods that are 'bad' for you? No because there are other more feasible solutions than to turn the gov't into a nanny state that dictates what you can and cannot consume. The government should have food companies spell out that things about their products are bad for you with more transparent ingredient labeling, so consumers are not deceived with what they are paying for. The government should also have food companies list out the dangers of excessive consumption of bad ingredients, like refined sugar - on the labeling, very much like what cigarette companies do.

    2 years ago

  • StargazerCottage

    StargazerCottage says: Featured

    I very much hope that this law goes into effect. This is a good baby step in the right direction. While I do not attribute human characteristics to animals I do believe they should be treated in a HUMANE way. I have been a vegetarian since I was 15 and will continue to be one. Not because I do not believe that humans should not be carnivores, but because they are so abominably treated. If I knew (or had an inclination to find out) how to hunt and consumed only what was needed for the feeding of my family then I see no problem with that. I believe in the food chain but not in the food industry. I say take that first step, and keep on going!!!

    2 years ago

  • crannyfoundfavorites

    crannyfoundfavorites says: Featured

    I'd be a huge supporter of the California law. I also thoroughly enjoyed NPR's work concerning Eduardo Sousa and his production of “natural foie gras”. Producing foie gras in that way makes sense to me, any other way does not.

    2 years ago

  • Corvid337

    Corvid337 says: Featured

    I'm not vegan, but am ashamed that I'm not because of the horrible way they treat factory farmed animals. I'm not necessarily against killing animals for food, just the way they go about doing so at modern day factories. I think foie gras should be banned, it's a very cruel and unnecessary way to handle any living thing. There are other things that are cruel as well, but banning this would be one step closer to what's right. Some things humanity needs to learn to grow out of. just because something's centuries old does not make it right.

    2 years ago

  • Guchokipa

    Guchokipa says: Featured

    Regardless if we agree or disagree with the ban, I think that this post raises some valid questions. I particularly like: "Why is it, despite everything we know today, that these food items still tend to be the cheapest, most affordable and accessible food items for those with limited budgets?". I do think that we need to overhaul the entire food production industry. Focusing on one rather rare technique compared to the overall unhealthiness of the mainstream system seems a tad extravagant.

    2 years ago

  • packmatthews

    packmatthews says: Featured

    Etsy is a fine forum for this topic. Allowing profits to determine popular "taste" no matter how perverted it becomes has been dehumanizing us for centuries. It brought us the cruelty of slavery, sweat shops big and small and now factory farming. Etsy is all about distributed production, human scale production, re-humanizing ourselves in the process. I'm honored to be among so many fellow independent and strong willed thinkers. Sad argument in the article, but the responses have given voice to a clear Etsy attitude. I'm glad we're unwilling to treat cruel and inhumane behavior "sensitively".

    2 years ago

  • istelleinad

    istelleinad says: Featured

    I would like to address some of the points raised in the comments thus far: (1) The "two wrongs don't make a right" argument: I'm not saying that nothing must be done to change foie gras production, but that there are far more pressing issues facing this country than the ethics of producing what is effectively a luxury food item consumed by a minority of the population. A more constructive way of addressing the "humane/inhumane" issue with regards to foie gras would have been to encourage a reform of its production methods, encouraging farmers to adopt Sousa's method, perhaps. Instead, the government chose to ban it, which is a missed opportunity for education and reform. (2) Contrary to what some commenters have said earlier in the thread, the liver of ducks and geese in foie gras production do not "explode", and they do not spend their days "living with a failed liver". It is in farmers' interest to treat their ducks and geese well in order to have a good product, to allow the livers to "explode" run contrary to their objectives. (3) The solution to the mass market factory farming system in this country isn't for everyone to adopt a vegan/vegetarian diet, but to moderate their intake of animal products and to source these products from local independent farmers that treat their livestock humanely, i.e., adequate access to pasture, sunshine, fresh air, etc. Everyone's nutritional needs are different, and what works for some does not work for others. Above all, the ability to choose one's diet and lifestyle is, by and large, a privilege that comes from living in an affluent society, so let's not forget that there many others around the world who don't even know where their next meal is coming from, let alone being able to refuse certain food items just because they're considered "wrong" and "inhumane" from a particular perspective.

    2 years ago

  • SEOWebDesign

    SEOWebDesign says: Featured

    Someone said that "eating meat is the oldest known human addiction." Gourmets, gourmands and just plain "foodies" takes such great pleasure in food that it becomes an almost orgasmic experience and overrides compassion, simple common sense and humanity. A 3-course meal as described in this blog article becomes a hedonistic experience. This addiction to the many exquisite tastes of meat and other animal products creates blind spots about the realities of the treatment of animals for the pleasures of the palate.

    2 years ago

  • OnlyOriginalsByAJ

    OnlyOriginalsByAJ says: Featured

    I'm not ashamed to say that I eat and enjoy meat. However, I'm very picky about where I buy. I only buy from local farmers who I know. They are humane to their animals and feed them well. I think the best solution to this problem is for people to educate themselves and to make information more available to the public for them to educate themselves. Then, they can decide for themselves what they want to do. I'm completely against taking choices away from people, but I also believe that if people understood how animals are treated in some instances, they will step up and ban them on their own. Maybe I have too much faith in the human race.....

    2 years ago

  • VoleedeMoineaux

    VoleedeMoineaux says:

    BACON!!!!!

    2 years ago

  • shannondzikas

    shannondzikas says:

    This is a sensitive subject but it deserves discussion and thought. I've been a vegetarian since I was 14 because it just seemed right, and still does but it's impossible to put my reasoning into words. Law or no law people will do what they want to. Information is far more powerful than legislation in my humble opinion.

    2 years ago

  • VoleedeMoineaux

    VoleedeMoineaux says:

    Sorry veggies, Im an endurance athlete also very inemic. If I didnt eat red meat I would be very sick. Ferritan iron is best in it's natural form. God put animals on this earth for a reason, to be consumed. I disagree with mass farming, however our bodies need meat.

    2 years ago

  • PaisleyPeaFabrics

    PaisleyPeaFabrics says:

    I do think meat production methods are obviously in need of change but the issue is complex. It's not obvious what the best way to approach these problems is.

    2 years ago

  • volkerwandering

    volkerwandering says:

    This reminds me of the very intriguing documentary "Food Inc." There needs to be changes, that is true, and it has some insight on what and how needs changing.

    2 years ago

  • MegansMenagerie

    MegansMenagerie says:

    I love my veggies but I also love my meat :)

    2 years ago

  • MilkyteaPrincess

    MilkyteaPrincess says: Featured

    I really suggest to anyone interested to pick up or borrow a copy of "Eating Animals" by Jonathan Safran Foer and also watch the documentary "Earthlings". I'm sure it streams somewhere free online. These two things are some of the best accounts of the harm the meat, fish, poultry and dairy industries do to us on a global scale. There are many voices out there that want hamburger meat and not only foie gras banned. I like how you put quotes around "inhumane". Do you think that animals don't suffer from being force fed? If I killed a man and someone else kills two, am I suddenly a saint? Comparing any of these things together doesn't seem like a logical argument for foie gras.

    2 years ago

  • jammerjewelry

    jammerjewelry says:

    Interesting and informative article thanks for sharing.

    2 years ago

  • theroyal

    theroyal says:

    for the love of geese that are force feed till they die in order to make some chemical reaction in their liver.... no thanks

    2 years ago

  • jolynn13

    jolynn13 says:

    While I have a very strong viewpoint on this topic, and would welcome discussion in another arena, I'm wondering why on earth it's being brought up here on Etsy?

    2 years ago

  • Jashme

    Jashme says:

    The concept of natural foie gras is interesting.

    2 years ago

  • lizgraffeo

    lizgraffeo says:

    I think that it is ignorant to say that we shouldn't ban one inhumane thing because we aren't banning all inhumane things. i agree that the factory farming of more commonly abused animals (like chicken/cows) is the most significant and inhumane part of the food industry, but i don't think that that means it is wrong to make improvements in other areas. Foie gras is produced in a starkly different way than other meat products, so many people are able to sympathize more easily with these animals. That is why this ban is being discussed, and I hope that it will be a starting point to more progressive legislation regarding factory farming in the future. No matter what kind of large-scale issue you're talking about--environmental problems, animal abuse, human rights issues--it's important to understand that any positive change towards achieving the movement's goal matters. I would love to simply eliminate all of the world's issues at once, but large-scale change starts with smaller victories like this.

    2 years ago

  • BabbidgePatch

    BabbidgePatch says:

    hmmm, my view - liver of any creature - including the tomalley in lobsters, is off my plate ;)

    2 years ago

  • littlegoatsoaps

    littlegoatsoaps says: Featured

    I totally agree with the fact that "they" are singling out one issue and IGNORING the others! Foie Gras is consumed by a minority in this country... while NASTY beef, chicken, fish and fill-in-the-blank are consumed on a massive scale!! It seems to me that the ban on Foie Gras is to placate the PETA crowd so they can continue to rake in million of dollars from producing inferior meat and sending it out labeled "safe". Not that i like the idea of exploding geese, but i am much more concerned about what is on the typical grocery shelves that is killing us. That said... we drink raw organic milk (which means i also have cream and butter), buy grass fed beef from a nearby farm and will be stocking up on whole natural chickens from our amish neighbors when the weather warms up. We are all for meat and dairy... just not nasty meat and dairy!

    2 years ago

  • FragmentedSplendour

    FragmentedSplendour says:

    Our bodies don't need meat to survive, we are the cruellest things on this earth and could do with being a little less selfish, assuming everything is here just for US because the rest can't speak our language. I wonder what a factory farmed animal would say given the chance... perhaps why?

    2 years ago

  • SheppardHillDesigns

    SheppardHillDesigns says:

    The distress the ducks and geese are subjected to as a feeding machine approaches and they huddle trying to escape the next feeding in vain - they are penned always within arms reach. I say good for California - may it lead the way for humane treatment of all creatures used in farming situations. Read about force feeding and you may change your mind on foie gras. "But for the sake of some little mouthful of flesh we deprive a soul of the sun and light and of that proportion of life and time it had been born into the world to enjoy." Plutarch

    2 years ago

  • scarletbegonia11

    scarletbegonia11 says:

    If we are going to start banning food I think we should start with gmos and all conventional meat, dairy and egg products...

    2 years ago

  • futurowoman

    futurowoman says:

    Your "two wrongs make a right" argument is completely unsound. I invite you to spend a few days up close and personal on a farm that creates fois gras, veal, and other extreme foods that torture animals for no reason except your own decadence. There are many, many problems with the meat, dairy, and agriculture industries in this nation. As a native of California's Central Valley, the most productive site of agriculture, viticulture, and dairy on Earth, I've seen first hand the inhumane and less inhumane approaches to food production--at the site of the farm, in terms of the animals and humans involved in production, and in the processing and transport sectors. The fact that this is an extremely flawed series of systems does not mean that one particularly decadent area should not be addressed. The next time you're stuff your face with duck and geese fat, I suggest you do in the presence of the very overfed, unable to move, dying for your pleasure while gasping for air animals whose fat, offal, and meat you so adore. If you can then sit in a stinky, filthy, crammed to the hilt with feces, force-feeding zone and enjoy your food, well then, fight the ban. Otherwise, I say kudos to my home state for this legislation and boo hiss to your selfish, unnecessary decadence.

    2 years ago

  • WineberryCandy

    WineberryCandy says:

    well said, lizgraffeo

    2 years ago

  • sherrytruitt

    sherrytruitt says:

    The treatment of livestock, meat and egg producing chickens on factory farms is nothing short of inhumane. But as a vegetarian, I also do not understand the concept of free range chickens and grass fed cows. If the end result is to murder the animal to cook it and put it on your plate why does it matter how it was raised?

    2 years ago

  • rebacorddesigns

    rebacorddesigns says:

    I grew up around a feedlot in Texas. I still remember when my father would bring home a side of beef for very little money because a steer or cow had somehow broken a leg in transport. My father had my mother and seven children to support. You eat what you can find that is cheap. That being said, my parents grew an enormous veggie patch every year and we ate what we put up each year and from the eggs and meat our chickens and turkeys produced. I understand when people say to pen animals for meat production is cruel. Is it cruel to watch a child go hungry because food is too expensive for a parent to buy? I don't like the thought of all of the drugs the feedlot workers would pump into the cattle when they came in to the feedlot and during their time there. Is it cruel to stand by and let this practice continue? Maybe. Until a better, more ethical, more 'sensitive' process can be found, people need to understand that eating is one monkey on our back we can't get rid of and to eat, pay for housing, gas, etc., we need cheap food and the way to do that (for now) is to pen animals to fatten them up for processing.

    2 years ago

  • greenBubble

    greenBubble says:

    Seriously? Does a group of scientists need to run tests and call a meeting together to declare they, "found a lack of conclusive evidence on the aversive nature of force-feeding [geese] and its injurious effects." Have we moved away from all intuitive cognition and common sense? Why don't you first watch a documentary done on the foie gras production industry and the problems found in force feeding geese. Geese don't struggle and thrash and require a full grown man to clamp it down with his arms and legs if they LOVE having a plastic tube thrust down their throat into their belly pumping them full of feed while being force fed. Some factories force so much fed on the geese that they are not able to stand nor move. The geese carry out the rest of their lives immobile, suffering a multitude of health complications and when they are mercifully slaughtered and freed from this abuse the profiteer is able to harvest a much larger production of foie gras from this wretched animal. THAT is way they force feed them. Your absolutely right. Geese livers do fatten naturally as a response to migration and winter. However, those geese are mobile. They can even fly with the size of their fatty livers. Not the geese in a foie gras production facility. Natural foie gras in my opinion is the only acceptable foie gras out there. I understand that natural foie gras is the exception NOT the norm. They biggest issue is there is a right way of production and then there's exploitation. Foie gras is most certainly associated with exploitation. Exploitation of geese and it's just cruel. I don't care how many Europeans huff and scowl at the thought, it's cruel. I hardly think Etsy is the proper platform to share lofty stories of elitist delicacies, exclusive European getaways, and proper 3 course meals with champagne... especially when it's a well documented controversial elitist subject to boot. Etsy has long been associated as a caring and artistic community exhibiting raw talent and a productive spirit of individuals who have a can do attitude and make their dreams happen. Let's just not muddy the pool.

    2 years ago

  • Traceritops

    Traceritops says:

    "Where are the bans on soda, high-fructose corn syrup" Unrelated.....neither of these are inhumane.

    2 years ago

  • WillowandQuinn

    WillowandQuinn says:

    We must fight against the spirit of unconscious cruelty with which we treat the animals. Animals suffer as much as we do. True humanity does not allow us to impose such sufferings on them. It is our duty to make the whole world recognize it. Until we extend our circle of compassion to all living things, humanity will not find peace. ~Albert Schweitzer, The Philosophy of Civilization

    2 years ago

  • estheraguirre

    estheraguirre says:

    I'm very green and respectfull with animals, but when it comes to foie gras.... Long live the ducks and geese.... Keep making it!

    2 years ago

  • shshhshop

    shshhshop says:

    This is one of the most illogical and misguided articles I've seen on the Etsy blog. First of all, her argument that they shouldn't ban one bad food because they don't ban other bad foods is just ridiculous. Of course we'd want to see the worst cases of factory farming "outlawed", but it's a gigantic industry fueled by the same people who bring you the ads "Got Milk?" and "The Incredible Edible Egg." You can't break that industry, but you can choose to no longer participate in it. "Let me qualify that the notion of force-feeding an animal for food doesn’t sit comfortably with my foodie conscience." So, you don't like it, but choose to set that discomfort aside to have momentary "pleasure" in eating. You can eat with a lot of pleasure without consuming force-fed ducks, or any animal. "However, I’m also aware that part of that discomfort is a result of anthropomorphizing animals reared for consumption." Animals aren't here "for us", they're here because they've evolved along with us, out of luck and surviving. Animals bred for consumption are unethically sound, to me. There are pigs who can no longer stand, turkeys with breasts so heavy they spend their lives in pain. It's not anthropomorphizing, it's empathizing. And without empathy, we couldn't call ourselves human.

    2 years ago

  • terabliss

    terabliss says:

    Etsy is really not the area I would want to discuss this kind of issue. I love Etsy for the diverse and open communities, local and handmade, recycled, upcycled, and made with love arts and crafts. I'm assuming most people on Etsy are aware of the importance of supporting local and small business artists and I would think that mentality would cross over to all aspects of their lives, including their food. I am a vegetarian for personal, ethical reasons. I hate the corruption of factory farming. But I think when we support local farmers, including meat, dairy and egg producers, we are decreasing the chance for corruption and animal suffering. It's better for the community and the animals. Banning the production of foie gras, hopefully, will send a message that people do care about the treatment of animals raised for food. We are far from perfect but small steps are better than none.

    2 years ago

  • AvianInspirations

    AvianInspirations says:

    So, since we're not fixing every problem with food ever, we should do nothing? Faulty logic at best.

    2 years ago

  • shshhshop

    shshhshop says:

    Also, I hate that the term "foodie" always has to include exotic or overly prepared animal products. I'm a foodie, but rather than experimenting in killing intelligent animals and killing our environment, I make the BEST bean burgers, seitan roasts, root veggie stews, and vegan baked goods. I understand that eating this way might not be for everyone, but STOP it already with glorifying unjust and unnecessary killing. Foie gras is not orgasmic, to me it's disgusting and selfish.

    2 years ago

  • StillStories

    StillStories says:

    I am totally with terabliss. Etsy is a place where you can post perhaps your appreciation for foigrass, but not political or controversial debates or thoughts. This is a place to be artsy and appreciate, not put down others ideas. Perhaps you wish it was available in california, and perhaps I am glad they will not be allowed to shove a tub down a ducks mouth and forcefeed it; but either way, etsy is a place we admire things, not criticize.

    2 years ago

  • SEOWebDesign

    SEOWebDesign says:

    The way most farm animals are treated is a shameful blot on humans. I have come to a point in my life where eating the flesh of another creature has become difficult and simply does not feel right. I am eating more and more vegetarian meals and loving them! The only humane way to eat is to not eat anything that requires another living creature has to die or be tortured in the process. No-one should even ask whether or not it is humane to force feed a goose, feed growth hormones to chickens or turkeys so that they an be killed when still babies, or any of the other shabby things done to farm animals. It's a no-brainer - animals feel pain and terror. Wouldn't you in the same situation?

    2 years ago

  • pinkpandacraftshop

    pinkpandacraftshop says:

    :'( I don't agree with any animal being tortured. I hardly eat meat, I try to eat as much not to be sick with low iron. But when I do eat meat I try to eat applegate or products like it. But usually I stick to my quorn and boca burgers. I just hate to see anyone, any animal or anything to be tortured. Just sadtimes. :/

    2 years ago

  • VeloNoir

    VeloNoir says:

    Once again, the kind of food that people eat has become an indicator of the huge socio-economic divide present in our society. Those who can afford to can therefore indulge on such decadent delicacies while others barely have access to healthy and wholesome food.

    2 years ago

  • GoGoCactus

    GoGoCactus says:

    There's a really simple solution to the problem of sketchy ethics of raising and killing animals for food: stop eating them.

    2 years ago

  • popalicioustoo

    popalicioustoo says:

    i give many KUDOS to California and I wish that other states would follow suit - i also thing that there are many other issues such as farm animals -- environmental issues...etc... that have to be dealt with more quickly than immediately -- you know the expression you have to start some where and i truly applaud California for doing so -- it is a horrific thing and for what...i won't go into all of the animal issues but they are serious and we have to remember that they are living things and they were not put on this earth for us to be cruel to in any shape or form -- i am a vegetarian and i only by certain by products from known sources -- i don't purchase packaged cheese -- eggs -- milk...etc...they are purchased from local dairy farms -- i feel very strongly about how any animal is treated. again -- applause for California and I am sure there are many more happy geese...we don't even want to start on veal...etc...horrific and people should not turn their heads -- they should help prevent this kind of treatment.

    2 years ago

  • DRaeDesigns

    DRaeDesigns says:

    I'm in agreement with Jolynn13 and others as to why Etsy has opened this type of topic for discussion. It should be addressed elsewhere being such a sensitive subject.

    2 years ago

  • mylittleposies

    mylittleposies says:

    But my morals disagree GoGoCactus. I see absolutely nothing wrong with eating animals. It's been done since the beginning of humanity. I've gone on a completely balanced vegan then vegetarian diet to prove to my friend that some people do need meat and I was sick. A lot. My doctor prescription? Start eating meat again. I do feel badly for animals that are treated terribly. However how about instead of stupid legislation banning different foods we actually make our USDA and other departments do their jobs. How about we make it worth it for employees of these places to place complaints about the conditions of the farm or slaughterhouse. Your morals may say eating meat is wrong, your morals might say raising animals to eat is wrong. Your morals may say eating things that other people can't afford is wrong. My morals say do something real about it rather than passing ridiculous laws and starting ineffectual programs like PETA and such.

    2 years ago

  • GoGoCactus

    GoGoCactus says:

    I'm pretty sure I said nothing of the sort. I simply made a suggestion that the simplest thing you can do to stop the never-ending philosophical and practical debates is to stop engaging in the behavior.

    2 years ago

  • baconsquarefarm

    baconsquarefarm says:

    Interesting read, thanks for sharing it.

    2 years ago

  • AprilMarieMai

    AprilMarieMai says:

    i'm a foodie/gourmet person and i'm vegetarian, mainly vegan. the two things are not mutually exclusive.

    2 years ago

  • myvintagecrush

    myvintagecrush says:

    I think the problem lies less in eating meat, and more in the WAY we consume meat. The geese are force fed to become bloated, ie: bigger, heavier foie gras to sell. Portion expectations have gotten as out of hand as the factory farms that encourage them. Enjoy your artificially fattened foie gras ;)

    2 years ago

  • SheppardHillDesigns

    SheppardHillDesigns says:

    The goose is force fed, over fed, so the liver becomes ultra fatty. At some point the liver "explodes" - the goose dies - and there is your foie gras, the liver. The tradition of cruelty in procuring the foie gras goes way back, as they used to nail the feet of the duck or goose to floor boards to secure them for the force feeding, I've heard. I really think it's time for these things to end. Sorry for the graphic detail.

    2 years ago

  • Recy

    Recy says:

    Agree with MilkyteaPrincess and Futurowoman. The only truly humane way of eating is vegan. Also wondering why this person was allowed to use Etsy as her platform to whine about the possibility of not having her beloved dead flesh anymore? Go California!!

    2 years ago

  • SheppardHillDesigns

    SheppardHillDesigns says:

    This is a bad subject, I'm outta here.

    2 years ago

  • Recy

    Recy says:

    "It's been done since the beginning of humanity." Rape, war, and murder (and a great many other atrocities besides) have also been done since the beginning of humanity.

    2 years ago

  • bunnyingitup

    bunnyingitup says:

    So because we're not fixing all of the things, we shouldn't fix even one? That is incredibly, incredibly stupid. Yes, more common things are just as fucked up. But doing ANYTHING is worth it, it all starts somewhere. It's remarkably inhumane, and you don't have to "anthropomorphize" an animal to think these things shouldn't be done to them, you just have to have enough goddamn compassion to realize they are living beings who feel pain and we have no right to torture. lizgraffeo, SEOWebDesign, shshhshop, greenBubble, and futurowoman say it all pretty well.

    2 years ago

  • bunnyingitup

    bunnyingitup says:

    ' "It's been done since the beginning of humanity." Rape, war, and murder (and a great many other atrocities besides) have also been done since the beginning of humanity. ' Heheh. Well said.

    2 years ago

  • Recy

    Recy says:

    Not long ago, West Hollywood banned the sale of fur. That, paired with the issue in this article, leads me to believe that the rest of the country should take an example from California.

    2 years ago

  • PhenomenalCreations

    PhenomenalCreations says:

    I do not understand why this discussion is on Etsy. However, the following is just my opinion. The bible states that certain animals were put here on Earth for man to consume. That being said, there is always the option to buy meat that is hormone free and free range. Why go out of your way to consume something that you know is inhumane to produce? I think that humans should be more conscience of their decisions when it comes to what goes in their mouth. I mean, let's be honest. Would your world come crashing down around you if you made the wise decision to never eat foie gras again? I don't think so. Now. Let's have a more appropriate Etsy discussion. I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest that we discuss crafts. Not some sort of food that someone consumes only because they think it makes them look 'cultured'.

    2 years ago

  • stelie

    stelie says:

    Fish Is meat!!!!

    2 years ago

  • KettleConfections

    KettleConfections says: Featured

    Should the government ban foods that are 'bad' for you? No because there are other more feasible solutions than to turn the gov't into a nanny state that dictates what you can and cannot consume. The government should have food companies spell out that things about their products are bad for you with more transparent ingredient labeling, so consumers are not deceived with what they are paying for. The government should also have food companies list out the dangers of excessive consumption of bad ingredients, like refined sugar - on the labeling, very much like what cigarette companies do.

    2 years ago

  • juicylucydanger

    juicylucydanger says:

    Self-justification is worse than the actual offense. Perhaps you can swallow it, but I cannot. In any event, à chacun son goût.

    2 years ago

  • tararie

    tararie says:

    An article about wanting to protect the practice of terrorizing birds?! So sad to see this on Etsy. :(

    2 years ago

  • spottedpupkids

    spottedpupkids says:

    With all the wonderful food that is available to us why would anyone chose to eat something so nasty. You can call it gourmet or a delicacy, its still a fatty liver from a duck that has been force fed until its sick. I'm also wondering why this is on etsy.

    2 years ago

  • StargazerCottage

    StargazerCottage says: Featured

    I very much hope that this law goes into effect. This is a good baby step in the right direction. While I do not attribute human characteristics to animals I do believe they should be treated in a HUMANE way. I have been a vegetarian since I was 15 and will continue to be one. Not because I do not believe that humans should not be carnivores, but because they are so abominably treated. If I knew (or had an inclination to find out) how to hunt and consumed only what was needed for the feeding of my family then I see no problem with that. I believe in the food chain but not in the food industry. I say take that first step, and keep on going!!!

    2 years ago

  • crannyfoundfavorites

    crannyfoundfavorites says: Featured

    I'd be a huge supporter of the California law. I also thoroughly enjoyed NPR's work concerning Eduardo Sousa and his production of “natural foie gras”. Producing foie gras in that way makes sense to me, any other way does not.

    2 years ago

  • VintagePassions

    VintagePassions says:

    Sheesk, I just turned the news off for some peace and separation from negativity.....I get on Etsy and start reading this! I do Etsy for pleasure; there are tons of other boards on the web for this kind of controversy. Guess I will start dinner instead! And no.... I wouldn't dare say what I am making....

    2 years ago

  • BijouxOdalisque

    BijouxOdalisque says:

    I am utterly confused. I thought Etsy got rid of the forums? Interesting to discuss, but what does it have to do with Etsy artists, sales, customers, etc?

    2 years ago

  • MalloryMlynarek

    MalloryMlynarek says:

    I think we should all do our own research and determine what is inhumane. I personally believe foie gras is inhumane, but most of factory farming is. We should all be educated on where our food comes from and how it comes to be. The best way to know the truth is through videos, pictures, and lots of research. I don't think animals should suffer for our taste buds and I support the California ban. Force feeding animals their whole lives is, in my mind, very cruel.

    2 years ago

  • SheppardHillDesigns

    SheppardHillDesigns says:

    www.stopforcefeeding.com

    2 years ago

  • welltrainedpaper

    welltrainedpaper says:

    People, and not politicians, need to get involved. If more people knew how animals were mistreated in preparation to become our next tasty morsel, they may feel differently. However, we're very much a see it, want it, get it culture. We also want it now, so many of use don't care why there's a shortage, as long as we get ours. It's all about me, me, me - our consciousness needs to shift to one of "we're all in this together." Remember, the earth is not ours, it's borrowed. We need to leave it better than we found it.

    2 years ago

  • CricketsDaughter

    CricketsDaughter says:

    ETSY is NO PLACE for a topic like this. Now, I am off to eat a FABULOUS MEAL of A FAT, JUICY STEAK and all the trimmings.....only in RED MEAT can you obtain NATURAL nutrients that your body needs. ONLY IN RED MEAT. YUM, YUM AND DOUBLE YUM.......oh, AND fried chicken, pork chops and milk are great additions to your wholesome diets, too:)

    2 years ago

  • weezieduzzit

    weezieduzzit says:

    No more foie in Clalifornia yet Paula Deen gets to keep the cooking show that promotes the lifestyle that gave her type 2 diabetes AND she gets to profit from it by hawking diabetes drugs for big pharma? Only in America......

    2 years ago

  • Parachute425

    Parachute425 says:

    We've already had Foie Gras Gate here in Chicago. It was banned for sale in 2006 and many city chefs were outraged and some still made it but didn't "charge" for it. The ban was repealed a couple of years later. For the city that was "hog butcher for the world" it seemed like a silly law at the time. Perhaps that will change. Will be interesting to see what happens in California.

    2 years ago

  • Zoestings

    Zoestings says:

    It seems to me that California banning foie gras will only increase even worse beef and chicken sales. I mean it's one thing to eat meat once a week maybe because of the B vitamins, which are amply found in meat, and iron, especially if your a menstruating woman. But every meal? That is gluttonous. Especially since it makes no sense in this day in age!! first, Why would you take food, corn, and feed it to an animal for so many years, have it do no work at all in it's life like plow a field, when humans could eat that food and grow? It is disgusting, especially since so many different companies are profiting from mass farmed chicken and beef including biology companies which engineer the bioengineered corn which feeds US cattle . Pharmaceutical companies which produce the antibiotic these animals need from living in such cramped quarters. And more As far as I'm concerned, that's more inhumane than over feeding an animal for it's lifetime. And what about veal? Is that ban coming right behind? I Really hope so ! I also think banning foie gras will be putting a lot of americans out of work. Hopefully they will adjust but will they just start farming veal????? This might just make things worse, is what i'm thinking....

    2 years ago

  • mothrasue

    mothrasue says:

    ARe you KIDDING ME!!!! Foie Gras??????? Etsy, what the heck are you thinking? Have you seen how this is made??????????

    2 years ago

  • WagstaffJewels

    WagstaffJewels says:

    Congrats to the author for stirring the pot...Although I DO NOT agree with her point of view, I am heartened by the intelligent and compassionate responses that have been posted. I am glad to see that so many people are at least verbally opposed to such production methods/animal cruelty. Some one mentioned education as being a great way to change peoples eating/buying habits, and to a large extent I agree. For example, if people understood that 100 grams of lean meat 3 to 4 times a week was enough to provide the average adult with their protein/iron needs, then a whole range of problems could be seriously addressed: 1/ Less meat purchased = no overcrowding on farms... 2/ No overcrowding on farms = healthier, less stressed animals, that don't require massive doses of prophylactic antibiotics (that's 3 wins right there :)) Also, no overcrowding greatly reduces the risk of bacteria contamination in meat (hey, not standing around in cramped conditions in everyone's faeces can do that for you :) 3/ Great reduction in use of antibiotics in our food chain = great reduction in the development of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria. Of course I'm being a little simplistic, but you get my drift :) The benefits and knock on benefits of less intensive farming due to reduced demand for meat are enormous. If folks could learn to eat meat in moderation, that would be a great leap forward in my humble opinion. Not only for the animals, but for the land they are raised on, and also for our health. My country (Australia) is apparently now the second fattest nation on the planet, America the first. The spiralling health problems stemming from this (heart disease and diabetes, to name a few), can't purely be blamed on overeating of meat, but of course a change in diet would be beneficial. I'm a dedicated Omnivore, so quitting meat is not on the cards. I can however eat less, and because I eat less, I can afford to buy free range. This is not only great for the animals etc, but sends a message to the agriculture industry...because big business only listens to the bottom line. So vote with your dollars people, if you don't buy nasty products, no one will sell them. Many thanks for the stimulating discussion :)

    2 years ago

  • mothrasue

    mothrasue says:

    Puncturing birds' throats with sharp metal feeding tubes is ok as long as you can eat their liver once they've been brutally and often slowly killed? And it's ok because you think it tastes good? Shame on you.

    2 years ago

  • misshelena

    misshelena says:

    To produce foie gras, workers ram pipes down male ducks' or geese's throats two or three times daily and pump as much as 4 pounds of grain and fat into the animals' stomachs, causing their livers to bloat to up to 10 times their normal size. Think about this the next time you're devouring your "luxury food item." What exactly is the point of your article? Are you trying to justify consuming this product because other "more inhumane food choices exist?" I'd love to know where you draw the line. Listen, I'm vegan - but not some sandal-wearing, patchouli-smelling vegan. I'm just a person who decided I could live without killing or torturing another animal for food. It's really not that hard. Try it for a month and you'll see what I mean.

    2 years ago

  • anandabalms

    anandabalms says:

    "Don’t eat meat? Well then, let’s take a look at where our fish comes from" wow. Etsy blows my mind. Of course, if you don't eat meat, well you obviously must eat fish! This is *not* the correct venue for a discussion like this. This so so incredibly inappropriate here, and I'm sure the author meant well, but she needs to get educated. To defend foie gras by saying that other kinds of meat production are also maybe, possibly inhumane is preposterous. Foot in mouth syndrome etsy. Foot in mouth syndrome. full disclosure: I've been a vegetarian for 26 years. I've read a lot of hooey from carnivores defending their rights, but this article absolutely takes the cake for sheer ridiculousness.

    2 years ago

  • WolfHouse

    WolfHouse says:

    I understand the basic point you are trying to make, however none of the counter arguments have anything relating to the main subject. Yes it is unsanitary and unhealthy to allow for mean to be processed poorly and made readily available. However the problem people have with foie gras has nothing to do with the people eating it's health or anything of the sort. You briefly discussed the living conditions of cows, but I think there would be few people out there who wouldn't prefer a short life living in cramped quarters and perhaps a lame leg, but surrounded by some kind of social support, to a long life alone where you are constantly feeling painfully full and have so slowly wait in agony as your liver completely fails.

    2 years ago

  • MayaS

    MayaS says:

    Well said, Mothrasue! Big thanks to everyone who supports California ban.

    2 years ago

  • WagstaffJewels

    WagstaffJewels says:

    Just quickly too, a big shout out to all the mom and pop farmers out there who are struggling just to stay afloat because the supermarkets they sell to are massively greedy and only pay farmers a minute piddling fraction of the retail price for the meat they buy. (This goes for all fresh/primary food producers). Both the end consumer and the farmers are being ripped off by the middle men. This practice has lead to many farmers being forced off the land, and allowed big factory farming companies to swoop in and buy up ever more farmland, which has only helped entrench cruel intensive farming methods. Again, voting with your dollar is worth a go... farmers markets seem to be on the rise now (at least in my little corner of the world), and I know when I buy there that the profits go directly back to the farmer, not some bloated supermarket chain/corporation. Who would've thought that simply buying the groceries could make some sort of positive change in the world? :)

    2 years ago

  • marvinklaire

    marvinklaire says:

    I agree with SheppardHillDesigns it is very painful for the ducks.I am a vegatarian but I dont care if anyone else is or isnt but I do think everything thing is entiled to a good life while it is living, even if eating meat is the circle of life, wouldnt it be nice if everything had a good life while it was living, and lived for the land and killed an animal for food when we needed it like the natvie americans did

    2 years ago

  • bijouxboutique

    bijouxboutique says:

    I lived in France for 6 years and yes I did eat foie gras, I eat meat. It is however barbaric how it is produced, but if I was offered it I wouldn't turn it down.

    2 years ago

  • mothrasue

    mothrasue says:

    I agree that Etsy is no place for this kind of discussion. Aren't we all about handmade beauty, vintage awesomeness, and supplies you can't live without? Where does blood and pain come into it?

    2 years ago

  • LeeSmithDesigns

    LeeSmithDesigns says:

    It seems to me you trying to make excuses to make yourself feel better and find reasons to be justified about eating this highly inhumane food. If you truly cared about the treatment of animals in facotory farms or elswhere you would choose to make "humane" food choices no matter what you ate. Part of making these choices are giving up something that you may enjoy very much for the larger better purpose, not making up reasons to find loop-holes in your reasonings. Europe has been taking many steps to ban the inhumane treatment of animals from food to cosmetics. Good for them!

    2 years ago

  • Mongella

    Mongella says:

    If you're going to get on a soapbox about animal rights, you shouldn't be complaining about not being able to eat foie gras, one of the most hedonistic and pointless foods in the universe (in my opinion). I'm very confused. Shouldn't we be happy that someone, somewhere is doing SOMETHING about animal rights? As for the banning of "unhealthy" foods, I hope everyone realizes that "Foie gras" is French and literally translates to "FAT LIVER." fat. Don't drink that soda kids but go right ahead and order that slab o' goose fat!!!!

    2 years ago

  • frighten

    frighten says:

    It's not about anthropomorphizing the animal. It's about compassion for an animal's pain and suffering. Duck, cow, dog, or any animal.

    2 years ago

  • cbogdan

    cbogdan says:

    Speechless and disgusted by this article.

    2 years ago

  • bunnygarden

    bunnygarden says:

    Wow, you can't see the difference between an animal that is FORCE fed grain and one that binges itself to help survive he cold lean months?

    2 years ago

  • sarawinkler1

    sarawinkler1 says:

    I am always happy when any kind of cruelty is challenged and or stopped. We have to start somewhere and just like how wearing fur has become unpopular (Thank God). Banning Foie gras is just another good step towards being humane to all animals. I'm thrilled it's being banned. We all should be, because it's a good sign that we are moving in the right direction. I'm hoping that all animals that are killed to feed the masses will be treated with the respect they deserve. They are in fact dying so that we can eat. They should at lease be killed humanely.

    2 years ago

  • figmintvintage

    figmintvintage says:

    This is a logically flawed and deeply offensive article. I am thoroughly disgusted with your lack of consideration for all non-human entities, Danielle.

    2 years ago

  • Mclovebuddy

    Mclovebuddy says:

    i loved foie gras and i loved veal, i also loved the chinese duck (raised immobile in a small tube), but i couldn't justify that with what they have to endure. if muscovy ducks got outrageously fat on their own and had the fat liver to prove it, i'd go back to consuming it. the old world does a lot of messed up stuff to their animals for the sake of gastronomy with traditions that go back a thousand years. sometimes, it's best to simply turn the page and move on.

    2 years ago

  • VoleedeMoineaux

    VoleedeMoineaux says:

    I thought this blog was about crafts and artists. A little off the subject there ETSY!

    2 years ago

  • PattiTrostle

    PattiTrostle says:

    I haven't eaten meat in many years. I don't judge others for eating it, I just personally choose not to.

    2 years ago

  • lv2cr8

    lv2cr8 says:

    Foie Gras gate

    2 years ago

  • unmasked

    unmasked says:

    I enjoyed reading this blog post!

    2 years ago

  • sassandperil

    sassandperil says:

    Wow, why this article is here on Etsy is beyond me. I'm a bit turned off to say the least. While I certainly find Foie Gras and its process to be beyond cruel and unexcusable it is hardly an argument appropriate for this website. Not eating meat is a LIFESTYLE and I do not appreciate it being brought up here for naysayers to attack those who adopt its compassionate ways. I don't instigate discussions on religion, sexual preferences, or politics in the places I do business as they are highly SENSITIVE subjects and would ask the same in return. This is extremely disrespectful.

    2 years ago

  • Troubadori

    Troubadori says:

    While I (speaking only for Sonya here, not Darya) feel that the ban on foie gras is good for animal rights, I understand where the author is coming from. It is easy to condemn a practice one does not currently participate or benefit from. For most of us, foie gras is not on the menu on a weekly or monthly basis. It is harder to force ourselves to be critical of our every day practices when they give us convenience or help keep another dollar in our sometimes already thin wallets. What I grasped from this article is not to pat ourselves on the back for tackling smaller injustices when we are still unwilling to wrestle with issues that are destroying our own bodies. (not to diminish the suffering of factory cattle. That is also abhorrent) While the author is outraged, i think she'd be better served to look at the foie gras ban in a positive spin. Hopefully this piece of legislation will make it easier to pass further animal and human health and well-being legislature in the future.

    2 years ago

  • punktchen

    punktchen says:

    why is this on etsy? You can raise cows and fish humanely. You cannot force feed a goose humanely. Easy. Also, there are plenty of healthy vegan or vegetarian athletes. "God" did not put animals on this planet for us to eat. They just evolved like everything else.

    2 years ago

  • overkast

    overkast says:

    I really don't think I'll be trying foie gras any time soon.

    2 years ago

  • alexandsnakes

    alexandsnakes says:

    I would like to point out, as an aquaculture veterinarian, fish are meat. Not all fish raised are raised on fish meal (or any animal meal) - look at catfish and tilapia.

    2 years ago

  • soundinnovation

    soundinnovation says:

    I heard about the Eduardo Sousa's natural foie gras on This American Life, and I have to say that I was fascinated. I'd eat that kind, but I'm not sure I'd eat it if it was made using the gavage method. All that aside, when are we going to have lab grown meat? Think of it. You'd just clone a couple of muscle cells from an animal, then you could grown them in a sterile environment all you wanted. You probably wouldn't even necessarily have to kill the source animal, just take a tissue sample. You could also use that method to grow meat from endangered species! I wanna eat a tiger steak!!

    2 years ago

  • littleorangekitchen

    littleorangekitchen says:

    Hisses and boos to etsy for what seems a non-indie craft related editorial. I am a meat eater. It is impossible to create foie gras in a "cruelty free" environment--cruelty free options do not exist...comparing the production of foie gras to factory farming is a good one, but so what? This makes it OK?

    2 years ago

  • SusiesBoutiqueTLC

    SusiesBoutiqueTLC says:

    Congratulations on your article.

    2 years ago

  • AscendedEarth

    AscendedEarth says:

    There is no reason to rely on animals for food when there are vegetables. I cannot think of anything more inhumane than eating our animal companions. It's beyond my comprehension how someone could eat anything like foie gras. I don't care what country you are visiting and what the culture is. Unbelievably compassionless.

    2 years ago

  • lotusheart01

    lotusheart01 says:

    I could never eat or wear anything with a face, this includes fish. Fish is after all still flesh. These animals we consume because "God" so called put them here for us have just as much a right as we do to live. The very act of being born creates in us and in every other living creature a survival instinct, we all want to survive! And in them it exists no less than it does in us. Perhaps if you raised your own "food" and were involved in the entire process from beginning to end. If you kept, raised and ultimately slaughtered your own food, saw it's eyes as you snuffed it's light. Perhaps then I could understand the so called "food chain" we convince ourselves we belong at the top off. But if you just pick up your meat all pretty packaged at the supermarket with no idea or thought at all how it came to be there, then you did not earn your place at the top of any food chain, you lied and cheated your way there.

    2 years ago

  • lespetiteschoses

    lespetiteschoses says:

    who would have thought we would read an apology of foie gras on etsy, of all places? foie gras is a double offense to life, a cruel practice, force feeding, added to deplorable living conditions for the birds. in europe, foie gras comes from factory farming for the most part, as it is produced by the tons not only in france but mostly and for much cheaper in eastern europe countries so as to answer to the ever growing demand for it. the foie gras AISLES in french supermarkets during the holiday is a vision of pure decadence as far as the enormous quantity available, and all the forms foie gras is sold under from the most expensive (the whole foie) to the cheapest (the suspect mousse). finding support for this product on Etsy is really depressing and disheartening. thank you california !

    2 years ago

  • bellenessa

    bellenessa says:

    As Gandhi said, "The greatness of a Nation and it's moral progress can be judged by the way it's animals are treated". And as Thomas Edison said, "As long as we keep harming any living beings, we will still be savages". Let's act like the most civilized of all species on earth that we, humans, are supposed to be. Small victories lead to big success. Well done California!

    2 years ago

  • JewelsbyJasmin

    JewelsbyJasmin says:

    Yikes, a very sensitive subject! Not one I'd care to discuss on Etsy.

    2 years ago

  • littlesoup

    littlesoup says:

    go Cali! as a chef i will never prepare foie gras or eat it.wondering how anyone that knows how it is made can do that with a conscience. factory farming is a horrible business in itself but thats for another day.

    2 years ago

  • bellenessa

    bellenessa says:

    Thank you so much for all the animal rights supporting comments, everyone! Compassion begins with the smallest creature.

    2 years ago

  • bellenessa

    bellenessa says:

    And thank you, Etsy, for discussing this subject!

    2 years ago

  • BramblesHedge

    BramblesHedge says:

    Please Etsy, lets stick to the arts in the future. My sincere hope is that most humans recognize that animals are not on this planet to be exploited and tortured by us. If we need laws to protect animals from the other humans, so be it.

    2 years ago

  • DaisyDiddles

    DaisyDiddles says:

    I think Foie Gras production and consumption is the height of selfishness and cold-heartedness, considering the torture that the animals endure. Here's a video showing the reality of what these animals go through, which is all the reason I need to avoid it completely. 'Barbaric' and 'inhumane' doesn't even begin to cover it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QqI-28WuoYQ

    2 years ago

  • Gypsymoondesigns

    Gypsymoondesigns says:

    Let's hope the rest of the country takes California's lead! Etsy why are you always alienating some part of your customer base? This blog post is not appropriate for a craft site.

    2 years ago

  • cartelle

    cartelle says:

    Danielle, I'm proud that you stick to your beliefs (and logic) even when you know it goes against popular opinion.

    2 years ago

  • Treehouse58

    Treehouse58 says:

    I hate to hear of any animals abuse. Sounds abusive to me to force feed any animal to please our sick appetites. Anyone that mistreats animals is a pretty poor excuse for a human being. And yes, I am a meat eater and my husband is a humane hunter....but it's hearing stuff like this that would make me consider being a vegetarian. What's so hard about being humane.....I'll tell you....it's usually greed. So glad this world is not my home....Heaven will be so great!

    2 years ago

  • beryllynn

    beryllynn says:

    You can write paragraphs on what humans have done in the past, compare it to other forms of meat production, twist words around to suit your fancy but what it comes down to is that it is incredibly inhumane, cruel and bottom line: murder. This does not belong on Etsy.

    2 years ago

  • MidnightGypsy

    MidnightGypsy says:

    I am so disgusted & disheartened by the way that animals raised for human consumption are often treated. That said, I AM a meat eater - but my husband & I raise our own all-natural grass fattened beef, pork, the occasional lamb, & raise our own chickens for meat & eggs as well. My husband is a butcher who has been in the industry for more than 30 years. During this time he's toured every major packing facility in the country & has frequently said that if most people actually SAW not only what makes it into their food chain but the inhumane manner in which most of our food animals are handled & butchered, they'd never eat meat again. This is precisely why we raise our own. We know what they consume, how they are handled, their living conditions & make sure they are butchered as humanely as possible. I wish more people realized they CAN find locally grown alternatives to "grocery store" meat that is raised on corporate farms & slaughtered in horrific packing houses. Often times, the price you'll pay per pound is simply market price, so the same as what you'll pay in the grocery store (depending upon the farmer) & you're getting a much healthier & ethical product.

    2 years ago

  • PrimaryRedux

    PrimaryRedux says:

    Wow i am sooooo glad i am not the only one angered by the ignorance of this post. Just about every paragraph of this post has at least one sentence that is sooo off the mark and completely ignorant. I was going to list all the estians with intelligent comments about their disgust of this post, but there are too many to list, that is the only good thing about this post. I'm out!

    2 years ago

  • jamiespinello

    jamiespinello says:

    Well, this was another ignorant article on etsy by this author. Although this article was garbage, I really loved reading the responses from our wonderful community of thinkers here at etsy. Just the fact that so many people stepped forward to point out this author's arrogant backwards misguided way of thinking is very touching. The world gets a little better everyday through the knowledge we share. Wish the article could have been more about facts and less about breezing over something and claiming to understand it.

    2 years ago

  • jamiespinello

    jamiespinello says:

    also here is the author's profile if you want to message her directly: http://www.etsy.com/people/istelleinad (also available at the top left link in blue, so im not disclosing any secrets here)

    2 years ago

  • Hoibakk

    Hoibakk says:

    After reading this article I feel more fortunate than ever to live in Alaska where I am able to provide my family with all wild meat and fish. I know my food has grown up healthy and chemical free. I think foie gras production is cruel and unnecessary, especially in light of the fact that it can be produced via natural methods in lieu of the horror of force feeding. To compare foie gras to all the other "bad" things that are available in supermarkets is just a sad attempt to justify an action the author knows is wrong and assuage her own guilty conscience!

    2 years ago

  • HardCandyGems

    HardCandyGems says:

    One small step at a time towards animal rights.

    2 years ago

  • publicemily

    publicemily says:

    I don't understand why this post belongs on etsy except to provide a list of people who support willful cruelty to animals which i will consult before making another purchase via the site.

    2 years ago

  • VintageChildModern

    VintageChildModern says:

    First, I have to admit that although I think there is a definite need to open discussions like this, I'm not sure Etsy is the place. I have been a vegetarian for many years, meaning no fish either (if you eat fish, you are a pescatarian, not vegetarian). I do eat unfertilized eggs from my own backyard chickens. I don't have much to add to the many well thought out responses above me, expect to say that I wish everyone could have the experience of raising a species seen as unintelligent and without feeling, such as chickens. We have seven chickens, each with incredibly unique personalities. They are loving to us, our dogs, each other and have clear likes, dislikes and are often playful and funny. I will never try to tell another person they don't have a right to eat meat, that is a personal decision, but I do think that when cruelty is involved, as it is in most cases with foie gras, it is unacceptable. And to suggest that we should turn a blind eye to one form of cruelty because there is always another form right around the corner just baffles me. Bravo California!

    2 years ago

  • Titelo

    Titelo says:

    Thank you Danielle I am french, living in Australia and I have been trying to explain exactly all you've said here, to my friends many time.

    2 years ago

  • VivaceCrafts

    VivaceCrafts says:

    Since when does being a "foodie" allow you to look pass the cruel torture that these birds endure? Mmm... the sweet taste of suffering. I wish people would take a look at the living conditions and butchering of "tonight's dinner" - I guarantee you will not look at meat the same way. This makes me sick. This does not belong on Etsy, and I'm glad that there are others out here who agree.

    2 years ago

  • MidnightGypsy

    MidnightGypsy says:

    And, I have to say, I am disheartened by the author's seeming attempt to justify the horror of how foie grois is produced by pointing to other practices within the food production industry. Two wrongs certainly do not make a right nor does it excuse the horrific manner in which these birds live & die. How heartbreaking.

    2 years ago

  • SevenIdeas

    SevenIdeas says:

    There are non-force fed versions of Foie Gras. The state could have just banned force feeding instead of the entire food. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABeWlY0KFv8&feature=player_embedded

    2 years ago

  • SevenIdeas

    SevenIdeas says:

    As a note, I'm also a vegetarian, so I wont eat Foie Gras anyway. I strongly support ethical meat eating, and there is a humane way to produce Foie Gras. I remember watching a Dave Ramsey episode on non-force fed versions.

    2 years ago

  • fabulousfrippery

    fabulousfrippery says:

    I have no problem with this topic being discussed at ETSY. ETSY has always been more than just a way to sell/buy handmade goods and services. It has a political edge that I find intriguing.

    2 years ago

  • VeganAndHealthy

    VeganAndHealthy says:

    Etsy, I can NOT believe that you allowed an article on your pages. I'm disgusted and dismayed. Countries that have passed laws against force feeding include Austria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway and Poland. Countries that have interpreted their general animal cruelty laws to prohibit force feeding include Holland, Israel, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Only a few countries allow the barbaric practice of force feeding ducks or geese to produce foie gras, with France being the main one. The Council of Europe has issued regulations (for ducks and geese) that encourage a ban on force feeding in all countries where it is not already practiced, and require research 'on alternative methods which do not include gavage (i.e. force-feeding)' for countries where the practice still exists. The European directive requires that "No animal shall be provided with food or liquid in a manner (...) which may cause unnecessary suffering or injury." A scientific report for a European Community committee condemns the practice of force feeding.

    2 years ago

  • debicase

    debicase says:

    I think the manner in which Foie Gras is obtained is disgusting and I hope the ban goes into place. Period. There are other less cruel foods you can enjoy. I am a native Californian and I fully support the ban.

    2 years ago

  • BaiaNicchiaFarm

    BaiaNicchiaFarm says:

    This is what still baffles me. We love some animals, dogs, cats, pet birds, rabbits, etc. We lavish millions of dollars on them as a nation. Feed them the best food, they sleep in bed with us, yet we think nothing of going to a grocery store and buying a slab of meat which was once a living, breathing animal with needs and feelings similar to our own family pets. Why do we not make that distinction? Why love one and then eat the other?

    2 years ago

  • bovinebubbles

    bovinebubbles says:

    "factory-farmed beef?" says the confused catltle farmer

    2 years ago

  • VeganAndHealthy

    VeganAndHealthy says:

    Exactly BaiaNicchiaFarm! I wonder how many would continue to eat and enjoy foie gras if it came from an adorable kitten or puppy that had been forced fed until it was sick?

    2 years ago

  • pancakesyum

    pancakesyum says:

    Very disappopinting ETSY. Promoting animal cruelty. This is the most BRUTAL and BARBARIC act on a livng creature. You clearly have no connection whatsoever to other living things. You choose to make these decisions and you choose suffering. Eating foie gras is supporting the most torturous animal cruelty and boasting about the flavour is sickening. You may as well go beat up voiceless newborn children while you are at it. We all have feelings and experience pain. What makes a child any different to an animal? You are just a sick human being.

    2 years ago

  • Polyester10

    Polyester10 says:

    Dear VoleedeMoineaux. I'm ANEMIC too. I have been since I was 12. Now i'm in my 30s, and have not touched meat for decades. I was actually anemic while i ATE meat. now since switching to healthier iron-rich foods like spinach, etc im not. One biology class will show you that animals are no different than humans, with the same neuronal capacity for modeling even neurological behavioral diseases like alzheimer's down to the fruit fly. We are the same as animals, just a different kind of one. I COMPLETELY disagree that animals were put here to be eaten, I respect the ones we may consume for survival, such as fish, etc, but please put aside your religious manmade beliefs and think as a human. I believe in GOD but not manmade religion that claims we are to eat animals. NO WAY.

    2 years ago

  • Corvid337

    Corvid337 says: Featured

    I'm not vegan, but am ashamed that I'm not because of the horrible way they treat factory farmed animals. I'm not necessarily against killing animals for food, just the way they go about doing so at modern day factories. I think foie gras should be banned, it's a very cruel and unnecessary way to handle any living thing. There are other things that are cruel as well, but banning this would be one step closer to what's right. Some things humanity needs to learn to grow out of. just because something's centuries old does not make it right.

    2 years ago

  • Corvid337

    Corvid337 says:

    pancakesym, I agree

    2 years ago

  • Polyester10

    Polyester10 says:

    BAN FOIE GRAS. it's a disgusting way for any animal to die. Im vegetarian, and i wont hate you for eating animals, but at least make sure they die humanely. A humane death is IMPOSSIBLE with foie gras.

    2 years ago

  • Polyester10

    Polyester10 says:

    ETSY SHAME ON YOU. you have made many very very upset. this is not an article about meat, in general. this is about inhumanely tortured meat. not cool.

    2 years ago

  • rococovintage

    rococovintage says:

    I'm really shocked to see this article on a site like Etsy of all places. How can you justify the desire to continue to eat foie gras by pointing at other abuses toward animals that you consider to be "worse"? I'm also not understanding where you came up with the idea that there aren't a huge number of people that speak out against the meat industry... because there are. Without going into the "politics of meat" any further, let me just point out the fact that... well... why would you think that this was a good (or even appropriate) article to post on a website that caters to artists? How many of us do you think are vegans and vegetarians? Among artists, it is a much larger percentage than it is out of the general population. This was just a very bizarre choice for Etsy in my opinion, and certainly unnecessary.

    2 years ago

  • ScavengerBirdsArt

    ScavengerBirdsArt says:

    This post is just ignorant. I hope foie gras gets banned. Just because somethings been around for centuries does not make it okay to do. Humans need to learn to grow out of their bad habits, not make dumb excuses why it's okay to do. Yes, *most* large scale animal farming is cruel, but that doesn't make it okay to do it and an excuse not to ban something.

    2 years ago

  • rococovintage

    rococovintage says:

    By the way, I really don't like that buyers (people who are customers only, not also sellers) are seeing this article posted on the front page. I think it is a fast way to turn many new visitors off of Etsy immediately. The content Etsy posts in their blogs reflects upon all of us, and this is a position on a topic that many (it seems most) of us do not want to be associated with. Really, really poor publicity for the site and in very poor taste.

    2 years ago

  • VeganAndHealthy

    VeganAndHealthy says:

    This has nothing to do with the article itself, but rather for those who assume they must eat meat to get enough iron. If you eat a good source of plants that are high in iron together with a good source of vitamin C, such as citrus fruits, this will improve the absorption of iron by the body. Also, Iron intake is negatively influenced by low nutrient density foods, which are high in calories but low in vitamins and minerals. Sugar sweetened sodas and most desserts are examples of low nutrient density foods, as are snack foods such as potato chips. This information comes from http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/iron

    2 years ago

  • ThoughtOfIt

    ThoughtOfIt says:

    I have to agree with Jolynn13 and others above-why is this even on here? I don't understand why Etsy would even bring up anything but topics pertinent to what Etsy is about, which is fashion, be it vintage or new, household items, et c. I am a vegetarian who has done much research on the topic of animal cruelty (and many other topics), both for personal and school, and have gotten others to open their eyes. I can't even begin to tell you how strong my feelings are in regards to any animal being treated like clothing or food, especially since I know I'll make MANY people very angry. However, I would like to vocalize to Etsy my EXTREME irritation with a controversial and (personally) heart-wrenching topic being spoken of on here.

    2 years ago

  • therainyside

    therainyside says:

    Yes, why, why, why, ETSY, this repeated theme of meat and animal products? Are you just trying to inflame and hurt people? (Remember the Thanksgiving turkey article?) Disgusting! I am considering boycotting ETSY if this keeps up -- just one more article like this will do it. I'll take down my shop and never buy from ETSY again. Just because foie gras is a "tradition" doesn't mean we should continue with it, once we have achieved the consciousness that we are not the only sentient being on Earth. This is just ONE MORE REASON TO at least attempt to be vegan, for heaven's sake ------ again, humans are NOT obligate carnivores. There is no reason to practice deliberate cruelty in order to live. Yuck, Danielle - I think you are working for the wrong company. SHAME ON YOU!

    2 years ago

  • NikitaJade

    NikitaJade says:

    I'm not sure at all why there's an article about this on ETSY, a site for selling handmade, vintage, and supplies. But since it is here, this, "Let me qualify that the notion of force-feeding an animal for food doesn’t sit comfortably with my foodie conscience. However, I’m also aware that part of that discomfort is a result of anthropomorphizing animals reared for consumption," is a pretty unfortunate position. You're uncomfortable with your behavior, but not only do you continue to participate in it, you're writing an article in defense of it? Also, raising animals for consumption in a humane way is much different than treating animals cruelly in order to eat something that you like. And listing other industries that also do cruel or unethical things doesn't make the production of foi gras any more ethical - you're simply try to justify it by saying that other people do things that are just as bad.

    2 years ago

  • studiorandom

    studiorandom says:

    Please keep talking about meat and animal products. The ideology that human beings do not need animal foods to survive nearly cost me my fertility. I don't know if I will have any more children at this point but I would like to have the choice, and not knowing that I cannot convert enough beta carotene to get all my vitamin A from plants caused me serious problems with my menstrual cycle that could have led to a hysterectomy. I normalized my period by supplementing vitamin A from fish liver oil, a friend of mine has subsequently had the same experience and I have since learned that this is how they treat painful, heavy periods at charity clinics in developing countries. Vitamin A capsules are also how they prevent blindness in very young poor children, since kids under five can't convert beta carotene either. Etsy has preached veganism since I signed on. I grumble about it, but this is one of my favorite sites anyway because I don't need an arts and crafts website to tell me how to eat. I'm not that insecure in my food choices. I will even talk back to vegans because I know at the core of my being that they are wrong about the science. If they don't have that same unshakable knowledge, there's nothing I can do for them. By the way, in a non-CAFO environment, geese actually don't mind gavage. They don't have a gag reflex like we do. And that's what people get for anthropomorphizing a bird.

    2 years ago

  • studiorandom

    studiorandom says:

    P.S. You forgot to mention the deforestation REQUIRED to grow grain and soy, which are all full-sun crops, and the destruction of animal lives involved in both that process and the growing of plant crops. In terms of sustainability we'd be better off bringing several million bison back to the Great Plains and harvesting them for our food than we are adopting a completely unnatural diet (for humans) involving the manufacture of fake meats from a legume known to interfere with hormonal function and mineral absorption.

    2 years ago

  • therainyside

    therainyside says:

    ETSY: Please do NOT keep talking about meat and animal products. It's ridiculous and not relevant! I am sorry that some people may have had a bad experience with trying to being a vegan. That is not going to be the norm, however. Most, using research and care, can adopt a vegan diet. AND, being sensitive to an animal's reality and rights is NOT anthropomorphizing.

    2 years ago

  • debbieedge

    debbieedge says:

    Wow -- we are "anthropomorhizing animals reared for consumption" -- so I guess because we are going to murder them anyway, why worry about torturing them before hand... unbelievable thought process!!

    2 years ago

  • rococovintage

    rococovintage says:

    I started a forum post asking the Etsy staff to consider removing this article. Anyone who is interested to read it or to chime in may do so here: http://www.etsy.com/teams/7722/business-topics/discuss/9636823/

    2 years ago

  • VintagePatternPlace

    VintagePatternPlace says:

    What on earth does this have to do with crafting? Come on, Etsy!

    2 years ago

  • VeganAndHealthy

    VeganAndHealthy says:

    More than half the world's crops are used to feed animals. Further, perennial crops used to feed humans absorb five to seven times more runoff from storms than animal feed crops. With 30 percent of the earth's land devoted to raising livestock, a major cutback is needed to keep up with growing population. A 2010 UN report explained that Western dietary preferences for meat would be unsustainable as the world population rose to the forecasted 9.1 billion by 2050. Demand for meat is expected to double by this date; meat consumption is steadily rising in countries such as China that once followed more sustainable, vegetable-based diets. Animals fed on grain need much more water than grain crops. In tracking food animal production from the feed through to the dinner table, the inefficiencies of meat, milk and egg production range from a 4:1 energy input to protein output ratio up to 54:1. The result is that producing animal-based food is typically much less efficient than the direct harvesting of grains, vegetables, legumes, seeds and fruits for human consumption. A person existing chiefly on animal protein requires 10 times more land to provide adequate food than someone living on vegetable sources of protein.

    2 years ago

  • Fiddlestickswreaths

    Fiddlestickswreaths says:

    Our ability to choose our food is very personal to each individual. Wether we choose to be a vegan or an omnivore is a preference that is granted to us by the fact that we have free will. But with free will comes the ability to educate our selfs on the choices we make. We are all adults. For the most part we realize that ignorance is not bliss but a cover for possibly horrible things going on right under our noses. In educating myself about my food choices I have discovered things that have disgusted me and made me choose a different option that I found much more rewarding. Yes I eat meat. I buy whole chickens from my local farmer. I make three good meals out of the meat and broth from the bones. I buy pork from the local 4-H children that took pride in raising and showing their animal at the local fair. I buy all my fruits and veggies from my local farmers market, can them and freeze them for the winter. I even buy my flour from a women who grows and grinds her own wheat. It is rare that I enter a store. I live 15 minutes from Portland, OR. I am happy with my food choices. I keep my money local, support small farmers, and am healthy. I agree that animal cruelty is not necessary for the nutrition of humans. But sadly I also don't want to see more and more laws on what I can and can not eat. What happened to the family cow and flock of chickens? In many places it is illegal. Now government is thinking about taking a role in the running of farmers markets. I believe if a practice can be considered morally wrong by society educate people and they will agree.

    2 years ago

  • PineConeGarden

    PineConeGarden says:

    I'm laughing at the comments stating that god put animals on earth so we can eat them. That's pretty silly and narcissistic. I don't believe in god, so what's your answer to that? Anyway, I've been a vegan for 6 years and although, you won't ever catch me eating foie gras, I completely agree with you. There are worse things out there. I'm not vegan because I care deeply about animals, I'm vegan because I hate how our food is being farmed. I stay away from preservatives and processed foods, they're gross. Harmful preservatives, over processing, and antibiotic filled foods should be banned before foie gras!

    2 years ago

  • lissiebit

    lissiebit says:

    @ studiorandom - Um, that soy that's causing rainforest deforestation? That's not for the vegetarians. It's grown to feed livestock. It should be noted, while we're talking about unnatural diets, that soy isn't at all a natural food for said livestock. Please do research before publishing blatantly incorrect 'facts' for all to see. @ the original poster - In pre-school I heard something about two wrongs not making a right? Just because we have awful conditions for some animals doesn't mean that the inhumane treatment of another is fine and dandy. Especially when said treatment is beyond egregious and absolutely unnecessary. No one eats foie gras because it's the cheapest thing to put on the table and they need to feed their kids. It's an absolutely unnecessary indulgence. If you have no moral qualms about getting your kicks off the backs of animals which are made to suffer, fine, but don't try to justify it or call it anything other than what it is. A spade's a spade. Also: It should be noted that California has also taken steps to try to reduce the amount of suffering experienced by more 'common' animals which are raised for their meat.

    2 years ago

  • SubaqueousPress

    SubaqueousPress says:

    If one person has not "heard a peep" about a particular issue, this does not mean the issue has not been raised. This is a big world, and we each only have two ears. Just because only one issue makes it all the way through to vote does not mean it was the only issue being pushed there. Also, the comparison of foie gras served in a fancy restaurant to ground beef sitting in the grocery is a little beyond reason. I personally do not purchase meat or cook it at home, but the average Joe certainly does, and that is how many people sustain themselves and their families. Foie gras is not sustaining any American family; it is a luxury item. The people who pushed this particular issue did not do so because they think every other kind of meat production is perfectly acceptable. We have to work at one thing at a time. Do you think a bill banning all meat production would have ever gone to vote? This situation is setting a precedent. And how can you say this ignores the "elephant in the room"? Foie gras is made from factory farmed meat! That is the point! And lastly, when people talk about the "inhumanity" of animal cruelty, the word is not referring to the animals being killed but rather the humans performing the cruelty. Humaneness has to do with compassion, a uniquely human quality, that humans should also express to animals. That's where the Humane Society gets its name. I'm really surprised and a bit disappointed to see this article on Etsy.

    2 years ago

  • firamarina

    firamarina says:

    So true....this is completely irrelevant. What does this have to do with Etsy? I'm FOR banning fois gras....period. I just never thought something of this nature would've been on Etsy. This was such a disappointment to see.

    2 years ago

  • GhostshipPoet

    GhostshipPoet says:

    The argument made here is that because foie gras is a luxury, therefore less common, it should not be targeted first. So it is okay for a living thing to be tortured for the sake of human luxury? It doesn't matter what is banned first, just as long as the ball gets rolling. The "foodie" craze has a very negative underbelly that needs to be addressed (i.e shark fin soup, foie gras, and many others) and has basically become a borderline excuse to eat endangered animals or tortured animals (not to take away from the horrible barbarism that takes place with our every day foods). When does protecting an action in the name of culture just become an excuse to continue doing something horrible? Also, to put things into perspective, would you want someone who tortures animals for a living to come babysit your children? Many of us somehow make ourselves believe that torturing an animal is different from torturing a human, but it is really not that different at all. If someone has no problem with force feeding a duck until it dies or skinning a raccoon dog alive for fur, how far are they away from doing this to a person? If one truly cares about our natural world it should not matter what inhumane and destructive act is banned first, just as long as these things are being banned at all. It is pitiful to begin with that mommy and daddy (the government) need to make us stop doing these things and that we do not stop doing them on our own.

    2 years ago

  • VeganAndHealthy

    VeganAndHealthy says:

    Eat loads of bright orange veg and fruit (carrots, yams, squash, apricots) and dark green ones (spinach, kale, chard etc) which provides beta carotene that the body can convert to Vitamin A. Most healthy people get plenty of Vitamin A in their diet, provided they are eating well. But in my experience, there are all types of excuses for people to either not eat a vegan diet or to stop eating a vegan diet. If it's not for you, that's fine. But please don't try to tell vegans that they aren't getting enough nutrients or that they might die or some other horrible thing might happen to them because of their dietary choice. It's simply NOT true! Most vegans have done the research and know they are eating healthy while treating animals with respect and compassion.

    2 years ago

  • davita

    davita says:

    Irrelevant... and for those who even question the humane ways to raise animals for consumption, keep in mind that isn't even POSSIBLE for fois gras.... I mean, to each their own, really. But shoving a tube down a bird's throat and force feeding them just doesn't seem humane to me. I live by the "do unto yourself" principle and I sure as heck wouldn't want somone shoving a tube down MY throat!

    2 years ago

  • SquidPhotos

    SquidPhotos says:

    MMMMMM>...Foie Gras.....LOVE IT!

    2 years ago

  • therainyside

    therainyside says:

    Eat a lot of that in Redmond? Yeah, right.

    2 years ago

  • SquidPhotos

    SquidPhotos says:

    therainyside says: Eat a lot of that in Redmond? Yeah, right. __________________________________________ Two restaurants in our little downtown have it on the menu, as well as restaurants in nearby bend. Not to mention the three years I spent living in Europe....You do know that humans have the capacity to travel outside of their hometowns and experience other cultures, right?

    2 years ago

  • kymboslice64

    kymboslice64 says:

    just eww. i spend my days saving animals, caring for them. enjoy. and don't choke.

    2 years ago

  • debbieedge

    debbieedge says:

    I am a new buyer here -- and pretty disgusted!! Signed in to buy some lovely things not made in factories where conditions are poor and people are not respected, and I read this drivel about some elitist upset that she can't have her fois fras here in California... defending animal cruelty with the most ridiculous reasoning -- every paragraph has my blood boiling...

    2 years ago

  • Guchokipa

    Guchokipa says: Featured

    Regardless if we agree or disagree with the ban, I think that this post raises some valid questions. I particularly like: "Why is it, despite everything we know today, that these food items still tend to be the cheapest, most affordable and accessible food items for those with limited budgets?". I do think that we need to overhaul the entire food production industry. Focusing on one rather rare technique compared to the overall unhealthiness of the mainstream system seems a tad extravagant.

    2 years ago

  • kizzyrayan123

    kizzyrayan123 says:

    i think your article is beautifully written. Too often we get our head wrapped up in distractions and fail to recognize the inconsistencies in our own backyards. There's no ball rolling if we don't make provision for changes that affect the people at large. That's the problem, everyone just settles for the minimum. If you're not ready to talk about factory farmed meat and repulsive living conditions of more than half of the meat produced in America, you're wasting your time and mine.

    2 years ago

  • emilyMUSTARD

    emilyMUSTARD says:

    One thing that stands out to me is when she writes, "Don’t eat meat? Well then, let’s take a look at where our fish comes from." What, is fish a vegetable now?

    2 years ago

  • kizzyrayan123

    kizzyrayan123 says:

    However, we shouldn't lose focus on the bigger system that keeps unhealthy food raised and produced in inhumane ways so accessible. I, like you, am against force feeding ducks, but there are bigger fish to fry and more urgent battles in agriculture and aquaculture that need our attention.

    2 years ago

  • GreySkye

    GreySkye says:

    You cannot justify cruelty by saying "Well... this other cruel thing happens which is WAY more cruel, so this little cruelty is ok".

    2 years ago

  • AlpineGypsy

    AlpineGypsy says:

    Woah.........* backing away slowly *

    2 years ago

  • ananemone

    ananemone says:

    "While it’s certainly important to pay attention to the welfare of animals that we depend on for food, there’s also a point where we need to recognize that an animal’s physiology renders it capable of certain physical conditions that would appear “inhumane” to the human experience." -------------------------------------------- Oh my god, you're so right! Just because *we* wouldn't want to spend our entire lives in a cage so small we couldn't run around, develop terrible ulcers after sitting in our own shit for weeks on end, Never See Sunlight Or Feel the Wind Blow, doesn't mean a *pig* would mind any of that, or that we have any responsibility to treat an animal decently. I mean, they're just animals! We can do what we like to them, because they don't have feelings, or process pain, or have feelings or attachments to their young, or form social groups. Oh, wait. What you do, and what you support others' doing (by virtue of what you eat), matters. Doing the wrong thing is wrong. Don't let yourself rationalize your way out of what you know is the wrong thing to do. People used to say the same thing about slavery. White people could keep African slaves because they told themselves that Africans were different, and didn't mind slavery the way a white person would. I call BS.

    2 years ago

  • CoolTricks

    CoolTricks says:

    I saw a farm in France doing this very low key on Rick Steve's Travel show on PBS, here is a little article he wrote on it. http://www.ricksteves.com/news/tribune/dordogne.htm

    2 years ago

  • publicemily

    publicemily says:

    I was compiling a list of compassionate etsy sellers to check out their shops, saw that a list of sellers who've outed themselves as being in defense of cruelty was shorter and also decided to share it here. Shop accordingly! So far commenters who are pro Foie Gras: istellinad (author of the piece), squidphotos, studiorandom, titelo, bijouxboutique. And those who are just pro-meat ("happy meat," "gawd said we should eat meat," "i tried to be veg, but i got sick," "meat tastes good"): fiddlestickswreaths, phenomenalcreations, mylittleposies, rebacorddesigns, megansmenagerie, voleedemoineaux. Some comments didn't make sense/ i couldn't tell if it was sarcasm or not or if congratulating the author for standing up for her beliefs constitutes agreement, so i left out some names. But everybody else above this comment seems to care about animals - go etsyers!

    2 years ago

  • figurativepie

    figurativepie says:

    Dear Etsy, I love you and what you do, but this in not the place for topics like this. This is a community where we can all come together as artists, and this type of subject matter will only piss off those who find arguments in favor of cruelty disgusting and makes us ashamed to be human. In turn, those who are angry at this type of subject matter will voice their opinions, which will further piss off those who are in favor of horrendous treatment of living, feeling creatures. Now I've come to etsy and I'm angry and disgusted that you would even allow a post trying to extoll the virtues of some luxurious, elitist "foodie" crap like foie gras. Also, I would love to come to your homepage and NOT see a huge picture of foie gras. Now I feel sick. Thanks a lot.

    2 years ago

  • ananemone

    ananemone says:

    mine was sarcasm for the first part. (but I think that's pretty obvious) I am amazed by people's willingness to out their own lack of compassion as well.

    2 years ago

  • therainyside

    therainyside says:

    @ Squid --- yep I did enjoy the couscous dishes in Paris..........

    2 years ago

  • surfandsand

    surfandsand says:

    Etsy.....let's stick to what the site is about.... creativity and visual beauty. This topic has no place here. Now I need to go lay down. I'm feeling a bit nauseous after seeing the close up of that greasy hamburger.

    2 years ago

  • Fiddlestickswreaths

    Fiddlestickswreaths says:

    Publicemily I just wanted to make sure I understand that you just took it upon your self to blacklist buyers and sellers for commenting on a public forum?

    2 years ago

  • SiameseDreamDesign

    SiameseDreamDesign says:

    Very new to Etsy but.......why is this subject on an Etsy Blog????

    2 years ago

  • thehobotrain

    thehobotrain says:

    I'm blown away that Etsy published this article. It is not well written, it is unrelated to this website, and judging by the sentence at the end -- (We remind readers to please remain respectful when contributing to this sensitive discussion) -- whoever was behind the article foresaw that the comments would become heated and invited feedback by saying "What your take?". What's next -- an article discussing abortion vs. pro-life? Or capital punishment? Regardless of your eating habits, this is not the forum for this subject. It just doesn't make sense.

    2 years ago

  • poorlydrawnthings

    poorlydrawnthings says:

    Bravo for all the eloquent arguments in rebuttal to this article. It really makes my heart shine.

    2 years ago

  • BLUEskyBLACKbird

    BLUEskyBLACKbird says:

    These are the conversations that people need to have and EXPOSE to help implement change. No matter what side a person stands on....there obviously needs to be a major overhaul in the mass food industry. Change cannot happen overnight. We can only stand firmly in what we believe. So many important people in history have been condemned and murdered for speaking out against an issue no matter what side you are taking. I would think we can all learn from the mistakes our forefathers made in the past and don't judge those who speak out so harshly. Sometime what we need to see, the truth, isn't reveled to us until the time is right.

    2 years ago

  • candicewestberg

    candicewestberg says:

    I agree with you completely hobotrain. Why is this Etsy-appropriate! It's right up there with discussing religion or politics, it only elicites arguments and criticisms. I hope that the next topic does not follow this vein.

    2 years ago

  • SundustStudio

    SundustStudio says:

    I think this brings an important, broad issue into the open for us to boil down. People should be concerned about, informed and aware of where their food comes from, where their clothing comes from and as Artisans and Artists- where their resources come from.

    2 years ago

  • GourmetHandbags

    GourmetHandbags says:

    I have researched factory farming and how inhumanly “farm animals” are treated and have written many papers on the subject complete with disturbing PowerPoint presentations but I don’t think Etsy is where it should be discussed and I think it was in poor judgment to write an article on it especially without being educated on the subject. Letting your taste buds make your decisions instead of researching the facts on the issues is one thing but to broadcast it as an informative article is absurd and reckless. I do agree that people need to know the facts in order to make an educated decision on what they eat but they need to do so from a place that actually displays all the facts and not just opinions based on if it tastes good.

    2 years ago

  • LolaBosco

    LolaBosco says:

    I am thrilled this article got such a huge response.Poor etsy ,seems your in trouble with some ,not the right forum etc etc. well ,if nothing else its got people thinking ,sharing their views.I say well done etsy.

    2 years ago

  • lalunaranchwear

    lalunaranchwear says:

    I just think is dangerous that the US government starts regulating what we eat, this should be a personal decision, based on each individuals' sensitivities. Defending animals is great!! A worthy cause :)) I think we should start protesting Korea's love for dog meat, and ban any Korean product in the USA :( This subject is rarely discuss, and so inhumane and disgusting that has been kept in the dark for ages!! Maybe we should rescue/free all these little ones and build them a happy place for all...Veal too :(

    2 years ago

  • 2TrickPony

    2TrickPony says:

    I agree with California's decision, and instead of throwing the baby out with the bathwater, my hope is that this ban is the beginning of a broader movement in the humane treatment of animals in our society.

    2 years ago

  • lalunaranchwear

    lalunaranchwear says:

    Yes it is terrible, but the government should not be telling us what to do, it should be up to each individual and their sensitivities. The best we can do is ban these products ourselves. I have been trying to bring awareness to Korea's love for dog meat, this atrocious crime for human consumption has gone basically undetected!! :( I have my own small/personal ban against Korean products as well as veal, that is about all I can do :(( So let's add another one to the list :((

    2 years ago

  • lalunaranchwear

    lalunaranchwear says:

    Sorry I double posted, I thought I erased my comment :)

    2 years ago

  • daydogdesigns

    daydogdesigns says:

    What an awful thing to put on the FP of Etsy. With all the beautiful and lovely items here, to have to read of something so inhumane, make me feel sick. Good for California for banning such a cruel thing. Too bad Etsy isn't banning it from here.

    2 years ago

  • FlourishSalon

    FlourishSalon says:

    Interesting article, but I have no idea how this relates to shopping on Etsy. Considering it's controversial nature, this feels more like it should belong on a food site or someone's personal blog. This is not what my customers are coming to Etsy for.

    2 years ago

  • bellanotte

    bellanotte says:

    I think it's natural that a discussion like this might take place on a site like Etsy. Etsy is a place that tends to attract critical thinkers and non-conformists. And I think it's wonderful that, for the most part, the many sides of the issue(s) have been respectfully explored. I really enjoyed scrolling down and reading through the mostly intelligent and thoughtful responses.

    2 years ago

  • bellanotte

    bellanotte says:

    I think it's quite natural for a topic like this to appear on Etsy. This is a site that tends to attract critical thinkers and non-conformists. I feel that, for the most part, the many sides of the issue(s) have been explored in a respectful way. I enjoyed scrolling down and reading the mostly intelligent and thoughtful responses. Whatever one's position may be, it is important to remain open to at least listening to others' opinions.

    2 years ago

  • publicemily

    publicemily says:

    Fiddlestickswreaths, i was compiling a list of sellers whom i wish to avoid doing business with in future because of their professed beliefs that conflict deeply and intractably with my own. Judging by the overwhelmingly animal-positive tone of the bulk of the comments here, i thought others could use the same information without having to stomach reading through all the comments, including the distasteful ones.

    2 years ago

  • SilverBlueberry

    SilverBlueberry says:

    Pointing out that other foods are bad doesn't make foie gras better. Bull fighting is also a tradition but most people agree that it's too inhumane to keep. Not all traditions are good!

    2 years ago

  • boondockgirl

    boondockgirl says:

    Wow, the snob factor in that "article" is just through the roof. Is this what Etsy is becoming?

    2 years ago

  • TheTeardropShop

    TheTeardropShop says:

    I have to agree with those that feel this article is in the wrong place. This site is a site concerning handmade, vintage, handcrafts, art and supplies. It's not a food magazine nor a political forum. I could see political topics in the blog if they had to do with handmade, etc but this is completely out there and off topic.

    2 years ago

  • Bindiliv

    Bindiliv says:

    I am dismayed to read such an article on Etsy. I am a veterinary surgeon and at times have had to use this feeding method for sick birds. It is not kind, and only the very weakest birds do not resist. To suggest the legislation banning this farming method should not proceed simply because of the undoubted existence of other equally inhumane production methods is absurd. Instead, the implementation of this law should be seen one more step in the journey towards ending all inhumane animal production methods.

    2 years ago

  • MariaHelenaPhoto

    MariaHelenaPhoto says:

    Interesting article. We've had long discussions about which animals people select to protect, and the cuter ones always seem to win. The not so cute ones are ignored. Geese and ducks are cute, things that live in the sea seldom are, except maybe for dolphins. Personally I'm much more worried about aquaculture than foie gras.

    2 years ago

  • Vanessayoung

    Vanessayoung says:

    Im very unhappy with this... People need to learn to treat animals with respect and love they were not put here for food because if you have read the bible you will know that Adam and Eve were vegetarians. Are job as people is to take care of animals we shouldnt eat them or wear them thats terrible next time you eat an animal or decide to wear one why not take some time to think and ask yourself if you would like to be worn or eaten or even have you child eaten?

    2 years ago

  • cadreams

    cadreams says:

    I like this article and I love Foie Gras!

    2 years ago

  • ADoseOfAlchemy

    ADoseOfAlchemy says:

    I hope the overwhelming DISagreement with your 'take' on your palette's 'rights' to foie gras, at least gives you (and others who agree with you) pause. Things that are morally and ethically wrong--- when realized--- need to be changed. (Slavery, child labor, the obliteration of buffalo and so many poached animals for the greed of others, all come to mind). I'm just extremely sad to see this is even up for a debate, let alone there has to be a law passed to make it STOP. SHAME.

    2 years ago

  • SheenaT

    SheenaT says:

    Yes, I agree that it is normal and appropriate for humans to eat animals (and I do) but our consumption of animals and animal products has completely got out of control. We are living in an age of feast and gluttony where we think that we can have all we want all the time rather than just having what we actually need. The meat and dairy industries are there to feed our voracious appetites where we want to eat this stuff at every meal; in fact we probably only need to eat animal products a couple of times a week. Our over consumption of these products has been linked to obesity and cancer but still we can't stop ourselves. I do not agree with the production of foie gras - it is cruel no matter how you try and justify it. I agree with legislation that prevents unnecessary cruelty to animals and appreciate that the food industry cannot be sorted out over night. You have to start somewhere and it will be a long and possibly never ending process to supply the ever expanding world population with a safe and humane diet.

    2 years ago

  • BeachMonkeyBoutique

    BeachMonkeyBoutique says:

    It is easy to pretend these foods are a "luxury item" or that they are reserved for more refined palates thus they become glamorous or perhaps even sophisticated, but really, they're for people with limited sensitivity, lacking morals and/or whom have yet to realize the truth behind the absolutely disgusting meat industry. Perhaps they simply haven't been educated yet about what is really going on behind the scenes... those scenes taking place within farms where animals are raised (if you could even call it that) and brutally slaughtered for human consumption. What a filthy, sad and horrible world we live in, where beautiful, innocent, loving, gentle animals are tortured for the entirety of their lives, only to meet their doom at the end of a filthy blade. It's gruesome and I fear for our future as a society if there are posts like this floating around the net which actually SUPPORT the foie gras industry in any way. Sure, the author has a point that there may be far worse things out there at our American grocery stores, but let's get real here. Until we stop treating animals like food, we're SCREWED as a society. I firmly believe every meat-eater should visit a farm where animals are raised and slaughtered. Once you see where your "food" is coming from and you watch an animal die needlessly, you will go vegetarian. You will never, ever want to eat meat again. That is of course, if you have any heart at all. I'm disgusted by this author actually supporting the foie gras industry by suggesting "there are worse things out there," as if that somehow justifies it??? You have got to be kidding! Listen Author, I see your argument, but it's twisted and irresponsible! I wonder if you've ever watched the videos which document the process of making foie gras, as well as any other meat product. It's the same everywhere... torture, torture, more torture and then a death that is anything but painless. I sincerely hope anyone reading this will at the very least watch the videos of the process... everyone should know what they're eating, and where it REALLY came from.

    2 years ago

  • cartoonmonster

    cartoonmonster says:

    this blog post reads like a jr. high debate club argument....

    2 years ago

  • OneClayBead

    OneClayBead says:

    If I were a casual visitor to Etsy and read this, I would never buy anything here, ever.

    2 years ago

  • WarmWeenies

    WarmWeenies says:

    So, what the author is saying is that if the other food industries can be outright cruel..so can this one? Two (or hundreds of) wrongs never make a right.

    2 years ago

  • vividcolors

    vividcolors says:

    "Where are the bans on soda, high-fructose corn syrup" - those are not inhumane those are just very unhealthy, but since human beings are blessed with something called FREE WILL, they tend to be just a personal choice.

    2 years ago

  • dreamchaserart

    dreamchaserart says:

    i am always suprised on how most people think eating meat is more bad for the environment than eating vegetables eventhough forests and other natural landscapes need to get destroyed in order to grow crops and they often use chemicals so plants will grow faster and animals who want to eat from them get killed.... other than that i basically do agree with this blog taht it is strange that these "bad" products are easier to get by then the ones that were made with more concious.

    2 years ago

  • vividcolors

    vividcolors says:

    Just wondering where did my other comment go?

    2 years ago

  • vividcolors

    vividcolors says:

    "While it’s certainly important to pay attention to the welfare of animals that we depend on for food, there’s also a point where we need to recognize that an animal’s physiology renders it capable of certain physical conditions that would appear “inhumane” to the human experience." This meaning what, that animals can't feel pain? Because they do just as much as us humans. They can feel pain and they do get stressed! They fear pain and death just as much as we do! Also, we do NOT depend on animals for food, in fact we are healthier if we stay on a plant based diet (in my experience).

    2 years ago

  • friendlyfeathershop

    friendlyfeathershop says:

    There are always more important things to do than ban foods. Animal welfare is a issue that spans across the world, but all we can do is try to stop it on our home turf. I think its honorable that my home state is taking a stand, but it would be near impossible to stop the meat industry in the US. All we can do is put our money where our mouth is, and choose wisely if you eat animals. Of course, the best form of protest to to abstain completely.

    2 years ago

  • LavenderField

    LavenderField says:

    Amen sistah! You are so not over reacting. I agree with you 100%

    2 years ago

  • friendlyfeathershop

    friendlyfeathershop says:

    And I neglected to mention- This article is in bad taste. The writer seems to be projecting her guilt from enjoying a cruel meal in France onto the American meat industry. Two wrongs do not make a right. I urge Etsy to remove this ignorant and offensive writer, articles like this have no place on Etsy, they belong on self serving, hypocritical blogs. I am disgusted, and yeah, since when is a fish a vegetable? D'oh!

    2 years ago

  • CWPoppets

    CWPoppets says:

    Etsy! Shame on you! How can you publish such an article?!

    2 years ago

  • AnnaMarsh

    AnnaMarsh says:

    I always think that, hypothetically, if we were overtaken by aliens who were more intelligent than humans (which lets face it, wouldn't be hard), would it be ok for them to factory farm, slaughter and force feed humans to eat just because we don't match their view of "intelligent" life? Anyway, someone made a comment that "our bodies need meat" but that just isn't true. I was raised vegetarian as my mother is vege, and have been vegan for the past 24 years. I'm taller than average, am fit and healthy, have great hair and nails (if I say so myself :) ) and get sick far less often than many meat eaters I know. I'm not picking a fight with meat eaters, you eat what you like, but its not necessary to eat it.

    2 years ago

  • AGKs

    AGKs says:

    Please define "factory farm". Thank You

    2 years ago

  • TeenAngster Admin

    TeenAngster says:

    Hi there, This is Alison, editor-in-chief of the Etsy Blog. We encourage healthy debate and sharing your point of view, but I encourage commenters to remain respectful of other members and the author of this piece. To those who may wonder why we decided to cover this particular topic: here on the Etsy Blog, we report on issues that matter to Etsy members — like supporting independent businesses and artists, but also eating well, living sustainably, and being conscious consumers. Caring about where and how things were produced, whether it's a quilt, a doll, or a finely crafted meal, is part of the ethos that brings people to Etsy; if they didn't care, there's always a big-box store nearby, and Etsy sellers offer an alternative to that. Thanks, Alison

    2 years ago

  • PureDichotomy

    PureDichotomy says:

    Although obviously some others here disagree, I don't believe this article has any place whatsoever on Etsy. My personal feelings aside, I trusted Etsy as a venue to provide a safe and comfortable environment for the artists that vend here and the customers that browse and buy. I trust it to be a place where my customers can come and feel comfortable. Not be faced with off-topic controversial blog posts. The discussion / blog space here on Etsy should nurture that environment so that browsing the wares and learning about the craftsmen, artists and handcrafted items featured here is safe and enjoyable. Allowing extremely controversial topics such as this to be posted within the very public blog space does nothing to further a sales oriented environment. This is not about freedom of speech, nor about the topic in general. its about good marketing practices and understanding your audience.

    2 years ago

  • Mongella

    Mongella says:

    I have to ask how this article is a representation of being a conscious consumer. The author doesn't seem to care about animal suffering. She only discusses how "inhumane" it is that we poor, poor humans are exposed to low quality beef, and how "inhumane" it is that we are exposed to unhealthy foods. Whose fault is that?? Not the ducks' fault!

    2 years ago

  • Annasjewelry

    Annasjewelry says:

    They grab the animal by the neck and shove this metal thing down their throat that shoots fat into their stomachs - day after day after day until they kill the animal. I'm wondering if you would find it inhumane if someone did that to you???? But what does this have to do with selling handmade items???

    2 years ago

  • jamiespinello

    jamiespinello says:

    I am sickened by this article and disappointed in the ethics at etsy.

    2 years ago

  • sagittariusgallery

    sagittariusgallery says:

    O_o Why in the world is this on the Etsy blog?

    2 years ago

  • Annasjewelry

    Annasjewelry says:

    Just one of the many videos showing how they do it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ozws-u4xb0

    2 years ago

  • LittleWrenPottery

    LittleWrenPottery says:

    I agree with Mongella, I think articles like this at their core need to be about the root of the problem rather than being sensationalist. We've developed a dependance upon poor quality food over time that's just unsustainable.

    2 years ago

  • sagittariusgallery

    sagittariusgallery says:

    I'm sorry, but this entire article is a logic fail. And, even with Alison's explanation as to why this is on the Etsy blog in the first place, I'm still not seeing it.

    2 years ago

  • oldworldprimitives

    oldworldprimitives says:

    I am extremely disappointed to see this article on Etsy. "A lack of conclusive evidence on the aversive nature of force-feeding and its injurious effects?" Seriously? Then how about for your next article, you allow yourself to be submitted to the same force feeding process that foie gras geese undergo, and then report back to us on how it went.

    2 years ago

  • Adornyourself

    Adornyourself says:

    Healthy debate notwithstanding, in my opinion this has no place on an Etsy blog.

    2 years ago

  • KawaiiBits

    KawaiiBits says:

    Alison, I love reading the blog posts, they are usually very informative and fun. However, I do have to agree with the majority here. I am far from a Vegetarian.. I eat meat but by reading this blog post my jaw unconsciously hit the floor. I'm sure you understand where most are coming from but I don't think you realize the damage this post could have done or will do. The most damaging part, in my personal opinion, is when she says and I quote " Don’t eat meat? Well then, let’s take a look at where our fish comes from." I just couldn't believe this was written. From my understanding, most vegetarians don't eat fish either. To me.. it was incognito for "Not normal? Here, have a cracker". I apologize for the brutal honesty but I feel I needed to say something about it. I understand her innocence in writing this blog post but I just do not think she thought it through. Believe me, I have done this on more than one occasion and the outcome is usually not good. Etsy is a place for handcrafted, handmade...not hand stuffed and hand tortured. Sure, it could be about culinary but within the respectful limit of your readers. This is all with due respect.

    2 years ago

  • packmatthews

    packmatthews says: Featured

    Etsy is a fine forum for this topic. Allowing profits to determine popular "taste" no matter how perverted it becomes has been dehumanizing us for centuries. It brought us the cruelty of slavery, sweat shops big and small and now factory farming. Etsy is all about distributed production, human scale production, re-humanizing ourselves in the process. I'm honored to be among so many fellow independent and strong willed thinkers. Sad argument in the article, but the responses have given voice to a clear Etsy attitude. I'm glad we're unwilling to treat cruel and inhumane behavior "sensitively".

    2 years ago

  • veganosaurus

    veganosaurus says:

    The author is deluding herself if she thinks it's okay to justify eating force fed geese simple because there are other cruelties! Yes the meat and dairy industries do ghastly things but the logical conclusion to this article should be, exploiting animals in any way is bad. Humans do not NEED meat to survive. There are whole countries and civilizations which have been vegetarian and thrived healthily through the ages. And what about vegetarian/vegan animals? Elephants, Rhinos, Dinosaurs... where do you think they get their iron and calcium from? Alison, encouraging people to eat something so cruel is quite the opposite of "eating well, living sustainably, and being conscious consumers". It is extremely shameful to see such an article on Etsy! You know you have plenty of members here to whom kindness and compassion towards all living beings matters. So when you say you allow blog posts about topics which matter to members, are you saying that these members who find this article offensive do not matter to you?

    2 years ago

  • KawaiiBits

    KawaiiBits says:

    AGKs says: Please define "factory farm". Thank You ---------- A factory farm is just that, a farm that runs like a factory. These animals are treated like like a mere products and not living creatures. They are usually put onto a conveyor belt to be killed. That's factory farm in a nutshell.

    2 years ago

  • modflo

    modflo says:

    frighten says: It's not about anthropomorphizing the animal. It's about compassion for an animal's pain and suffering. ******** i agree! calling the recognition that other creatures experience many of the feelings, including intense suffering, we as people do "anthropomorphizing" only further entrenches the misguided idea that we humans are the only ones who really *feel* anything, and to attribute such emotions to animals is to project our own feelings. this is naive and narcissistic, even if not said with cruelty or ill will, which i don't believe the author of this article is doing, at all. i believe her intentions are good, so i m not slamming her in any way. just some of the ideas she presents. more and more, scientific as well as casual observers are noting the wide range of the emotional landscape among non human beings. so the concept of anthropomorphizing them, in this case, robs them of their own inherent selves and capacities to experience life in a myriad of ways.

    2 years ago

  • electricbluebird

    electricbluebird says:

    The ultimate "put a bird on it".

    2 years ago

  • CrushedBotanicals

    CrushedBotanicals says:

    Vegan and proud.

    2 years ago

  • GigglesTX1

    GigglesTX1 says:

    If you read your bible, God put animals on His earth to feed us, but I do not condone animal cruelties . Force feeding a animal is inhuman. I do not eat veal because of the inhuman treatment. I stay away from both for that same reason. As far as meat go's we need to feed the masses not every farm is inhuman. Going up in on a farm I know this first hand. Please don't comment if you don't know what your talking about. Just to be talking.

    2 years ago

  • Lapidarious

    Lapidarious says:

    The OP's argument is fraught with ridiculous assumptions, generalities and rationalizations. And since when is fish not meat? We do not need meat and the cruel environments we create surrounding our animals is just atrocious. In many forms. To give tacit approval for one cruel method because another exists is a sophomoric and ill informed. I am not about to jump on my soapbox about this asinine spewing gasbag article etsy dredged up from the muck, suffice to say its just plain inappropriate for this venue.

    2 years ago

  • anandabalms

    anandabalms says:

    Alison, your response is as nonsensical as the article. You say "we report on issues that matter to Etsy members", what? This is a site that has a huge number of sellers creating VEGAN items, and of course Etsy makes a ton of money from those sellers, please clarify how those sellers would care about the feelings of someone who might have a harder time acquiring foie gras? How does this article support "eating well, living sustainably, and being conscious consumers"? Vegansaurus posted a brilliant blog about this article, http://vegansaurus.com/post/16169275098 definitely worth the read, and please read the comment from the reader saying they wanted to start shopping here again, but have decided not to because of this article. The misguided decision to post this sort of article is losing money for your company.

    2 years ago

  • Lapidarious

    Lapidarious says:

    Anandabalms, Thank you, well said.

    2 years ago

  • FruteJuce

    FruteJuce says:

    Frois Gras is not about "less than ideal conditions for their ducks and geese" it is about cruelty. Just take a look at the video linked to above by Annasjewelry http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ozws-u4xb0 that isn't a bunch of cows in a feild, or a bunch of turkeys in a shed. Any newbies coming to etsy, this article does not speak for me.

    2 years ago

  • Iammie

    Iammie says:

    I want to try it now!

    2 years ago

  • Iammie

    Iammie says:

    I mean the natural one.

    2 years ago

  • vividcolors

    vividcolors says:

    anandabalms says: Alison, your response is as nonsensical as the article. You say "we report on issues that matter to Etsy members", what? This is a site that has a huge number of sellers creating VEGAN items, and of course Etsy makes a ton of money from those sellers, please clarify how those sellers would care about the feelings of someone who might have a harder time acquiring foie gras? How does this article support "eating well, living sustainably, and being conscious consumers"? The misguided decision to post this sort of article is losing money for your company. ------------------------------------------------------ Just what I was about to say.

    2 years ago

  • SameheartDesigns

    SameheartDesigns says:

    This article is a HUGE embarassment. And at the same time, I have goosebumps from reading so many of these conscious responses. When I was at the top reading the article, I was disgusted, not just about this practice of cruelty, but equally at the ignorance of the author. I can not express how relieved I was to read the overwhelmingly compassionate and well-educated responses. Thank you all for speaking up.

    2 years ago

  • debbieedge

    debbieedge says:

    Yes, Allison -- we buyers do have the choice of 'a big box store' -- or even little lovely boutiques in our towns. But with so much product being made in China, where human rights are appalling, I was going to try to shop etsy this year instead... hoping to find some beautiful items and support artists that were not a part of this culture. Now my first month here I read a blog defending animal cruelty at its worst -- and whining that California is trying to do something about it -- with completely idiotic logic and comparisions. It's hard to try to be respectful of the writer, when her article was so snobby and self-serving! I for one, have taken note of the sellers and their thoughts. I will certainly refer to it when purchasing anything on Etsy. While it is their right to defend this, it is my right to spend my money accordingly. Sellers who simply write "BACON" for a comment are not up there on my list to buy from. I fail to see your logic as well when agreeing to post this blog.

    2 years ago

  • krize

    krize says:

    I am glad I really love animals, ant this love includes not harming them...

    2 years ago

  • mothrasue

    mothrasue says:

    The vegansaurus blog post is awesome, thank you for posting the link anandabalms. (which is http://vegansaurus.com/post/16169275098) If Etsy just wants to make a buzz and get more traffic to their blog, they should say so. Put something like this up before the article: "Warning: the blog post is intentionally written in such a way to bring traffic to our site. Our numbers are down, we want your hackles up. Thanks for your support"

    2 years ago

  • oneeyeddog

    oneeyeddog says:

    It's really embarrassing that this article has a place on the site.

    2 years ago

  • AGKs

    AGKs says:

    I feel crazed that people continue to think all animals are "nice" and all people are evil. Being a product of the quintessential family farm, I have OFTEN seen first hand how cruel animals can be to one of their own species or another. Playing cat and mouse is not just an old maxim. Have you ever seen a cat torture a mouse? They do it seemingly for sport, because they don't always even eat the mouse. Chickens, yes free ranging barnyard chickens, will peck each other to death. I am not exagerating. One of our roosters, Hobart, lost his toes to frostbite. (Hey he was ranging free out there like everyone wants chickens to do). He led a terrible life, not from the foot injury, but from fleeing the other chickens on a daily basis. Life can be cruel. Animals are sometimes cruel. Just because you don't like to think so, that doesn't make it anything other than reality. So take the halo off your image of every animal out there. (And blah,blah,blah I am not talking about how a person may treat an animal, I am talking about the animals themselves and how unlovely they can be) By the way, this "healthy discussion" reminds me of the barnyard.

    2 years ago

  • peaceblossomcandles

    peaceblossomcandles says:

    I wish Cali would ban factory farming and feed lots... Feedlots, ever driven by one of those places? Ick. That's a HUGE problem but one that will never be addressed because people want their cheap munchy-burgers. How many eat foi gras? It's a miniscule issue in comparison. Now if the greater issue were addressed (factory farming and cruelty), I'd be more willing to take this one seriously.

    2 years ago

  • continentaldrift

    continentaldrift says:

    Foie gras is such a can of worms. I totally appreciate where you're coming from, but using Eduardo Sousa's naturally-produced foie gras as justification for farmed foie gras is a stretch. He makes it that way as an alternative to gavage. I read the EU committee report on foie gras, and while their findings may be inconclusive, they certainly noticed avoidant behavior on the part of the geese and ducks. Imagine having a liver so dangerously large that you could no longer walk - that's the condition the geese are in. I'm not okay with that. I agree with you that we should consider soda, corn syrup and factory farming in a similar light - and people are fighting that battle too. I don't understand the assumption that people who are against foie gras don't consider the source of their food elsewhere - I'm very mindful of the kind of meat and seafood I consume, and my choices around foie gras are in line with those choices.

    2 years ago

  • metroretrovintage

    metroretrovintage says:

    This is a really inappropriate and insensitive article in a blog that is supposed to cater to an eco-aware and animal sensitive community. Pull it!!!

    2 years ago

  • istelleinad

    istelleinad says: Featured

    I would like to address some of the points raised in the comments thus far: (1) The "two wrongs don't make a right" argument: I'm not saying that nothing must be done to change foie gras production, but that there are far more pressing issues facing this country than the ethics of producing what is effectively a luxury food item consumed by a minority of the population. A more constructive way of addressing the "humane/inhumane" issue with regards to foie gras would have been to encourage a reform of its production methods, encouraging farmers to adopt Sousa's method, perhaps. Instead, the government chose to ban it, which is a missed opportunity for education and reform. (2) Contrary to what some commenters have said earlier in the thread, the liver of ducks and geese in foie gras production do not "explode", and they do not spend their days "living with a failed liver". It is in farmers' interest to treat their ducks and geese well in order to have a good product, to allow the livers to "explode" run contrary to their objectives. (3) The solution to the mass market factory farming system in this country isn't for everyone to adopt a vegan/vegetarian diet, but to moderate their intake of animal products and to source these products from local independent farmers that treat their livestock humanely, i.e., adequate access to pasture, sunshine, fresh air, etc. Everyone's nutritional needs are different, and what works for some does not work for others. Above all, the ability to choose one's diet and lifestyle is, by and large, a privilege that comes from living in an affluent society, so let's not forget that there many others around the world who don't even know where their next meal is coming from, let alone being able to refuse certain food items just because they're considered "wrong" and "inhumane" from a particular perspective.

    2 years ago

  • Annasjewelry

    Annasjewelry says:

    Thought I'd post this again... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ozws-u4xb0

    2 years ago

  • Annasjewelry

    Annasjewelry says:

    Thought i'd post this again. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ozws-u4xb0 You tell me... this isn't cruel??

    2 years ago

  • SEOWebDesign

    SEOWebDesign says: Featured

    Someone said that "eating meat is the oldest known human addiction." Gourmets, gourmands and just plain "foodies" takes such great pleasure in food that it becomes an almost orgasmic experience and overrides compassion, simple common sense and humanity. A 3-course meal as described in this blog article becomes a hedonistic experience. This addiction to the many exquisite tastes of meat and other animal products creates blind spots about the realities of the treatment of animals for the pleasures of the palate.

    2 years ago

  • CandyGraphics

    CandyGraphics says:

    I find the illogical justification of animal cruelty in this article appalling.

    2 years ago

  • SilverBlueberry

    SilverBlueberry says:

    Sorry AGK, but we are the only species on this planet that systematically destroys nature and drives animals into extinction. See here for instance: http://listverse.com/2009/07/25/10-recently-extinct-animals/ 'Cruelty' among animals is part of their need to survive, and to strengthen their gene pool. For us, our humanity and care of our planet are our best assets for our survival.

    2 years ago

  • figurativepie

    figurativepie says:

    AGKs, I don't think anyone on here is trying to say that animals can't be cruel to one another (unless people are saying that and I've just missed it!). Because they certainly can be. But the question of cruelty should be what separates us from the other animals. We can recognize cruelty and see that it's wrong. We can decide whether or not we should be cruel to animals. I'm a vegan, but I know I can't convince everyone to stop eating meat. Someone killing an animal (quickly) to feed their family is one thing. Cruelty for decadence (foie gras, veal) or a cheap price tag (factory farming) is just sickening. I'm sad that Hobart was bullied by the others, but at least he had room to run away. In a battery cage, he would have been even more miserable.

    2 years ago

  • hugecat

    hugecat says:

    A very interesting and well-put article I thought. It's true that rearing geese for foie gras is no more inhumane (actually less inhumane in my opinion) than intensive chicken farming, or keeping pigs in pens so small they cannot even turn around. Yet how is it that this one food has been targeted? Could it be that there isn't a big lobby behind foie-gras farming? Consumers currently have to make a choice of whether to eat a free-range chicken or a battery-farmed chicken. Why therefore can people not have the choice of whether or not they eat foie gras? If you are going to start banning types of meat on the basis that it is inhumane, foie gras should not be the place to start. I actually grew up on a goose farm (not a foie gras farm - my family rears free-range geese for meat) and I can quite believe that geese queue up every day to be force-fed. My family often ends up eating foie gras from some of our geese who have basically eaten so much by themselves, with no gavage necessary, that they have turned their own livers into foie gras.

    2 years ago

  • BijouxOdalisque

    BijouxOdalisque says:

    Can we please have an article about banning irrelevant articles?

    2 years ago

  • NatureVisions

    NatureVisions says:

    istelleinad, there might be far more pressing issues, but this is the one you chose to bring to the forefront. Not only that, but also it only takes one person to make a positive difference. Apparently, others chose to do that in California to end what has long been a very cruel practice. Yes, there are many other inhumane practices, even in California, with regards to animals for food production. That's a very poor justification, though. So is saying that we're an affluent society, so we can choose whatever we want, while others can't. Even the average person isn't able to indulge in foie gras in this country. It's certainly not a product that is needed for anyone's nutritional needs, or anything else. I still can't believe you try to call the fact that animals feel pain anthropomorphizing just to ease your conscience. Obviously, you know very little about animals, farm or otherwise, or perhaps you would have not written this poorly thought-out article. Also, for fun, I typed in ban farmed fish on Google just now: https://www.google.com/search?aq=0&oq=ban+farmed+fi&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=ban+farmed+fish maybe you should have done that, too, no offense.

    2 years ago

  • PrimaryRedux

    PrimaryRedux says:

    I thought this post was bad enough but now the responses that were chosen to be featured and the writer of the article having her response featured?! Guess there's no such thing as unbiased anymore, but then again I guess this is not journalism either, just ramblings and off handed opinions and uninformed thoughts. I look to Etsy's blog less and less, and now I think I'm done with this blog. I don't even know where to begin in a response to istelleinad's response to her post, the rational behind it is just as lacking as the rational in the original post. oh someone make it stop, i guess I will by turning off now. But I want to give at least one thank you to NatureVisions comment. There are many other etsians here who make me happy too.

    2 years ago

  • FaithBeads

    FaithBeads says:

    So, should we ban soda because it's too cheap and not healthy? What about free will? If you don't like it, don't buy it. You know what's cheaper and healthier than soda?? Water.

    2 years ago

  • InGripsWeTrust

    InGripsWeTrust says:

    45 centuries of history and tradition does not not make it right! Unfortunately, the human race really isn't evolving as quickly as it should. Do we never learn? As for 'foodie conscience' Where is it? We don't need meat to survive. Would rather not see articles like this on Etsy - Unless you're in someway giving an unbiased account and educating people

    2 years ago

  • rococovintage

    rococovintage says:

    continentaldrift says: I don't understand the assumption that people who are against foie gras don't consider the source of their food elsewhere - I'm very mindful of the kind of meat and seafood I consume, and my choices around foie gras are in line with those choices. -------------------------- Exactly! And how about showing a proportionate representation of what the community is expressing in the featured comments? Not a single one featured that mentions the article being inappropriate for Etsy, and yet many, many commenters have said it.

    2 years ago

  • VeganAndHealthy

    VeganAndHealthy says:

    Well, I can say one good thing about istelleinad and this blog post, she has managed to get twice as many responses as any of her previous blog posts here in etsy and I'm sure that was the full intent of this article. AND, this can help etsy become more popular because they can say 'look how controversial we are' and 'look at how popular our blog is'. From comments I've been reading in the forum, not many people even realized that etsy had a blog. So perhaps this was done with the intent to drum up more blog readers?

    2 years ago

  • modflo

    modflo says:

    istelleinad says: "Above all, the ability to choose one's diet and lifestyle is, by and large, a privilege that comes from living in an affluent society, so let's not forget that there many others around the world who don't even know where their next meal is coming from, let alone being able to refuse certain food items just because they're considered "wrong" and "inhumane" from a particular perspective." ***** absolutely true! therefore, in my opinion, the onus is on those of us who *do* have the ability and privilege to make choices, to do so in a way which we feel is the most responsible and kind, to ourselves, to each other, the animals, and the planet which we all share.

    2 years ago

  • friendlyfeathershop

    friendlyfeathershop says:

    Justifying your privilege by pointing out that others may not eat and cannot choose.... that's really low, and disturbing. Who's perspective is this? Lets take the perspective of a goose- "A foie gras duck (or goose) is bred specially, and, beginning when the bird is 8 to 12 weeks old, it is force-fed several pounds of cornmeal two or three times per day through a long metal tube inserted in its throat. The ducks are confined to cages so small that they cannot spread their wings or turn around. The gavage continues for several weeks, at which point the liver has increased to many times its natural size, and the bird is slaughtered. Producers maintain that because ducks and geese do not have a gag reflex and are used to swallowing their food whole, gavage does not cause trauma. In response, animal rights activist cite reports showing that the forcible overfeeding results in severe distress to the animals, injuries such as esophageal wounds, and death from ruptured livers. Further, critics point out, the engorgement of the birds’ livers—the intended result of gavage—is a pathological response to the overfeeding. Once the animal’s liver has been enlarged to the intended extent, its health has been severely compromised, and it would not be able to survive long beyond the date of its scheduled slaughter in any case."

    2 years ago

  • ScrapHappyLyrebird

    ScrapHappyLyrebird says:

    "Above all, the ability to choose one's diet and lifestyle is, by and large, a privilege that comes from living in an affluent society, so let's not forget that there many others around the world who don't even know where their next meal is coming from, let alone being able to refuse certain food items just because they're considered "wrong" and "inhumane" from a particular perspective." ---- But with that privilege doesn't there come a responsibility? We have the means (most of us) to question where our food comes from and work for change. It doesn't have to be all or nothing, we can make small changes and choices. Saddened and disgusted to see this on the Etsy blog, but like so many others, glad to see the subsequent discussion and compassionate responses expressed in the comments.

    2 years ago

  • ScrapHappyLyrebird

    ScrapHappyLyrebird says:

    Agree exactly with modflo and friendlyfeathershop

    2 years ago

  • friendlyfeathershop

    friendlyfeathershop says:

    And you would prefer to 'encourage reform' than ban such a horrid luxury item... reform what? So you can continue to enjoy your luxury with lessened guilt? Should they gently shove the funnel down bird throats with love? Force feeding is force feeding no matter how its done, no matter how hard you try to justify your disturbing palette. This is one of the most ignorant posts I've ever seen on the internet.

    2 years ago

  • friendlyfeathershop

    friendlyfeathershop says:

    And I fully agree with ScrapHappyLyrebird- Bird power!

    2 years ago

  • buttonempire

    buttonempire says:

    I hope the author considers, when she's next on her head doing the ancient practice of yoga, how one cruelty never forgives or allows another cruelty to happen. Treat others as you would be treated is a pretty universal notion that perhaps the op needs to meditate on next time she's doing downward facing dog lest Karma catch her out at the force fed goose liver bar. Also, why the heck is this op ed piece on the etsy blog? Any press is good press? Not really, imho...

    2 years ago

  • alterdelenda

    alterdelenda says:

    Reading this post and some comments just shows me one main thing, everyone has difference in opinion and the number of those that respect others are few. I don't go around telling vegans they're stupid for not eating meat and dairy, and I don't expect them to say nasty things to me for eating meat and dairy, but avoiding soy and gluten. It's a choice. Some that are against eating foie gras do eat meat, and have ordered from mcdonlads, or bought a package of Tyson chicken. I'm not going to tell you how ironic that is... Should any animal be treated inhumanely? No, it shouldn't. There are humane ways of getting foie gras though that shouldn't get mixed in with the ones that aren't... just like there are farms that grow natural veggis and others that abuse them and the earth with unsafe chemicals. Seeing people take their own personal opinions though of what should be eaten and should not be and telling someone else they're wrong, makes me sick. Someone isn't wrong for picking hamburger over cucumber just as much as someone isn't wrong for picking muslim over cathlic as their religious choice. They're all choices that we all have to make. Make your own choices, and try not to judge others for theirs.

    2 years ago

  • FeltedFriends

    FeltedFriends says:

    "While it’s certainly important to pay attention to the welfare of animals that we depend on for food, there’s also a point where we need to recognize that an animal’s physiology renders it capable of certain physical conditions that would appear “inhumane” to the human experience." Please back up this statement with facts.What animal physiology are you referring to that allows animals to be capable of enduring suffering? You believe animals are indifferent to inhumane treatment? Seriously? Try having a tube rammed down your throat and your stomach overstuffed and tell us how you like it.

    2 years ago

  • glamourpuss86

    glamourpuss86 says:

    Props to Etsy for allowing this important matter to be brought to light. The populations dependance on animals is superfluous. The human race is ready to force feed, skin alive and torture for our their personal gain, no matter how superficial it may be. I live a completely vegan lifestyle and in return I am rewarded with a clean bill of health, clear skin and a clear conscience. Everyone should try it, you'll never turn back :)

    2 years ago

  • goddessofthecosmos

    goddessofthecosmos says:

    Why not ban all meat? Why is it okay to kill animals, but not humans? Killing is killing. If you can justify one you can certainly justify another. Is there a better way to kill for your food? It's all sick really. It produces sick bodies, sick minds, and a sickness of the spirit that is reflected in the larger culture around us. Yes, genetically engineered foods are just as sick. Yes, processed convienence food is also- sick, and breeds diseased bodies. Yes, factory 'farmed' anything is also sick, sick for the land, the air, the water. How do we as a culture, as a society move away from such practices? Let your food be your medicine, and your medicine be your food. Visit pcrm.org for a new way of eating. P.S. "Don't eat meat?"- to the author, a fish is an alive animal, aka-carnage-meat, something consumed by carnivores, not non-meat eaters...

    2 years ago

  • friendlyfeathershop

    friendlyfeathershop says:

    My apparently insulting comment was removed, although I am perpetually insulted by this post. Hypocrites!

    2 years ago

  • Fiddlestickswreaths

    Fiddlestickswreaths says:

    I believe that a purely plant based life style can be wonderfully healthy but to think that no horrible death to animals is involved in the process is not quite true. As soon as it is time to prepare the fields for planting the crop (wether this be conventional, organic, large scale or small scale farming) the deaths of animals start to add up. As the farm equipment roles over the land to prepare the ground for seeding, rodents and snakes are crushed, worms and other insects are cut apart and bird nests with the occasional bird that wont leave the eggs goes under the wheels. It is horrible when a mother doe leaves her fawn in tall plants (such as grains, soy plants, corn) with instructions for it not to move and a farm implement that cuts these plants runs them over. Sadly this happens quite often to fawns and other animals. These farmers are not bad people. They can not see the animal hiding in the path of the machinery. Even the backyard garden hoe and trowel slices the worm in half. Birds are often tangled in nets that cover fruits with no way to free themselves. Orchards can not legally sell a wormy apple even if it is a organic orchard. There are sprays and pesticides but I think the majority of people have an negative opinion of having poison laced fruit. So hormone traps can be set out to catch the moths that lay the eggs that hatch into the worms that eat the fruit. To the best of my knowledge there is no catch and release program for these insects. They die. Did they deserve too die purely for human food consumption? Does it matter how small and insignificant the life is? Extracting water to irrigating fields and orchards is a whole other subject on the loss of life for the production of crops. Then there is the transport of fruits and veggies designed so fresh products are available all year. I wont even delve into what the extraction of fossil fuels do to the environment and in turn the animals living in the area (the Gulf of Mexico). But in shipping those plant based products to consumers animals are struck all the time on highways. A semi truck has a hard time slowing down fast to avoid a leaping deer or a waddling raccoon. In every bite we eat, or every time we put on our favorite organic cotton t-shirt on a life has been taken to get that too us. For people to live off the food that someone else has grown for them some animal will eventually die. When all is said and done little harm as possible should be put in to all aspects of our food source. Respecting the life that was taken on purpose or accident can make us more aware of our food production. We can do many things to change the lives that are suffering needlessly in concentrated feeding lots and other horrible acts upon animals that are considered food. We can also look into the way our fruits and veggies are grown and see the changes that can take places there. But it would wise to not draw a line in the sand because nothing is black and white. No ones food does not come with out the price of a life.

    2 years ago

  • AlternateHistory

    AlternateHistory says:

    I am quite disappointed to see this article on Etsy's front page.

    2 years ago

  • SheppardHillDesigns

    SheppardHillDesigns says:

    OK - I used the word "explode" in my comment way up there on the page. Wrong choice of words. I should have said: The duck or goose's liver enlarges from the normal weight of 30 grams to the heavily enlarged weight necessary to qualify as foie gras, as the industry's own regulations requires, the ducks liver must weigh an absolute minimum of 300 grams. From stopforcefeeding.com " The industry always refers to the dry weight of the feed, which is about one pound per feeding. Adding oil and water doubles this weight, making it 20-30% of the bird's healthy body weight. Picture 30 one pound boxes of dry pasta and then add water. This is proportionally how much a 150 pound human would be force fed using this formula. The vast amounts of feed pumped down the ducks' throats causes enormous internal pressure. According to the ASPCA, "The birds' livers become so enlarged…that according to documentation by veterinarians, the animals must experience unspeakable pain and suffering. Birds have literally exploded from these forced feedings. The results of necropsies on dead birds that have been force-fed reveal ruptured livers, throat damage, esophageal trauma, and food spilling from the dead animals' throats and out of their nostrils." I see the word "ruptured" and I think "explode". Banning this is a "missed opportunity for education and reform" - are you kidding? This industry belongs on the trash heap.

    2 years ago

  • KelseaEchoStudio

    KelseaEchoStudio says:

    So many well articulated points have already been made that it's difficult to add anything new to this discussion. I applaud the sentiments expressed by the majority commentors in this forum, as they have already stated so many of my thoughts and reactions to this article. Plus, if the author is daring enough to a.) post this, and b.) post a defensive (yet again, hardly relevant) "response" of sorts to some of the many, many strong points brought up by the commentors, then there's no point for me to say more about the topic at hand. For my part, I just want to say that I'm disappointed by this article. Yes, this article did incite some interesting discussion and quite a few heartening responses. I'm ashamed to say I was not even aware of "foie gras" or what it was, but I'm glad you've brought up the topic so I can add that to my list of foods I will never, ever touch. Aside from that small enlightenment, the article completely ruined my mood for the entire evening yesterday, and I am still a little shocked and bewildered that this was posted. Etsy is a place I visit in my free time, or whenever I can catch a break at work. I like to browse shops, check on all of mine, and read the articles posted on the front page. They are usually thought-provoking and informative, even if the topics are sometimes very random. No, I don't think etsy should limit itself only to posting the ever-joyful-and-optimistic articles about vintage, local, and obscure foods or crafts. Etsy has tons of active users, both sellers and shoppers (many are both), and posting about various topics or viewpoints will hopefully help this massive network form and maintain connections with its various users. But that's the point - making connections and encouraging healthy discussions. This was recognized as a "sensitive topic" before the first comment was even posted. Sensitive topics have a time and place, but here, I think the main effect of this type of article will be to alienate a portion of your users - in this case, I would say no small number. The random and off-topic I can deal with; the intentionally and senselessly provocative post is harder to stomach. I realize that etsy cannot possibly delete this blog article at this point without appearing spineless or afraid, but please, please let this serve as a warning for the future. It would serve the site and its shop owners well not to post these types of articles. Yes, this is clearly an opinion piece and one person's viewpoint - but even though I know that logically, I can't help the sickening, angry, and frustrated feeling that continues to lurk right now when I think "etsy." I chose to visit other websites during my free time today and am honestly a little suspicious of reading any more blog articles. I chose to wait until today to comment since I felt I needed the time to calm down and avoid writing a judgmental, emotional post. I have to reiterate some of the points above and say that if I were a newcomer to the site, I may have clicked on the article and been too annoyed or disgusted to return. This has been said many times already, and there's a reason. Please listen to your users.

    2 years ago

  • mephistopheles

    mephistopheles says:

    I have had complaints from potential customers - many of my friends, including myself, have opted out of eating animal products - who saw this article on the front page and assumed this was some kind of cruelty-apologist organisation. That's totally not the impression I want to give people through my store. Please be more considerate of sellers before you post trash like this.

    2 years ago

  • mephistopheles

    mephistopheles says:

    "While it’s certainly important to pay attention to the welfare of animals that we depend on for food, there’s also a point where we need to recognize that an animal’s physiology renders it capable of certain physical conditions that would appear “inhumane” to the human experience." That is fiction. I am a life science major, and the idea that animals - especially vertebrates - do not feel pain is a sickly reminder of Descartes' assertion that humans are the only animals with souls. Thanks for the unresearched and unhelpful article.

    2 years ago

  • rococovintage

    rococovintage says:

    KelseaEchoStudio -- your comment is so articulate and so well put; it perfectly encompasses how I feel. I probably should have waited a day to post my thoughts, myself... it is certainly a good practice to cultivate. ;) Thank you for calmly, and eloquently explaining what I think so many of us are feeling. I hope that the calmness with which you have done so will more easily resonate with the Etsy staff, and allow the message to get through. Bravo! xxoxoxo!

    2 years ago

  • JennyBeauBenny

    JennyBeauBenny says:

    Even though there is unlimited science in support of a vegan diet, I don't need any facts to tell me that seeing animals suffer makes me feel horrible, and I refuse to participate. I don't care what my parents ate, or what they fed me, or what my peers do now, eating meat and dairy feels wrong to me. Cows milk is for calves, and humans are physiologically herbivores. The length of our intestinal tracts, the bacteria in our stomach, the shape of our teeth and jaws are the same as all other herbivores...

    2 years ago

  • ThreeBlackCats

    ThreeBlackCats says:

    Wow. I am not only shocked to see such an inappropriate topic posted here on Etsy, but I am completely dumbfounded as to how the writer could take the time to write such a lengthy article about something she obviously has no knowledge about whatsoever. Cheers to you "shshhshop"!!! Well said. Good for you California. Ban the fois gras! And hopefully soon they'll start looking after the rest of the animals as well. Animals do NOT exist for your eating pleasure. This article has really put Etsy in a new light for me. Not a very bright one either.

    2 years ago

  • urastarhouse

    urastarhouse says:

    May we lovingly end the suffering of ALL, animals and humans and the environment. If Foie Gras is banned it certainly could be used a s a president to ban other practices that create suffering. I think even though it does not seemingly address the larger problems, it is a step in the right direction, a step from harm and to freedom. Thank-you for helping us to see the bigger picture. That is just what this issue is meant to do. Steps are powerful very powerful.

    2 years ago

  • CheekyBeast

    CheekyBeast says:

    Grateful for so many articulate, intelligent comments. Also grateful to be spurned to create a list of shops I will NEVER purchase from, and others I would be happy to support.

    2 years ago

  • SEOWebDesign

    SEOWebDesign says:

    GigglesTX1 says: "If you read your bible, God put animals on His earth to feed us, but I do not condone animal cruelties " **** This is not true. God did not put animals on the earth to feed us. If you read the bible, in Genesis, chapter 1. is the follow "Then God said, “Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is on the surface of all the earth, and every tree which has fruit yielding seed; it shall be food for you." Moving on to chapter 2 is also, "Then the LORD God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone; I will make him a helper suitable for him.” Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the sky, and brought them to the man to see what he would call them; and whatever the man called a living creature, that was its name. The man gave names to all the cattle, and to the birds of the sky, and to every beast of the field, but for Adam there was not found a helper suitable for him." There really is no bible passage that states that animals were created as food for humans. Animals were even presented to Adam as possible "helpers" (friends, in my mind), not fond suitable by Adam (then woman was created). I ask that you provide the exact source in the bible to support your claim that animals were created for food. This unfounded Christian believe really is just an excuse to kill and eat animals.

    2 years ago

  • Soupis

    Soupis says:

    "While I do not doubt the existence of farms that provide less than ideal conditions for their ducks and geese, I’m puzzled as to why this food item, with more than 45 centuries of history and tradition, is being singled out when other more “inhumane” food choices exist." This food item can be singled out because it is only consumed by a small portion of the population. However if this law passes it can act as the ground work to similar laws applying to more widely eaten foods. Hopefully laws like this can be part of a change to the way we raise food.

    2 years ago

  • OnlyOriginalsByAJ

    OnlyOriginalsByAJ says: Featured

    I'm not ashamed to say that I eat and enjoy meat. However, I'm very picky about where I buy. I only buy from local farmers who I know. They are humane to their animals and feed them well. I think the best solution to this problem is for people to educate themselves and to make information more available to the public for them to educate themselves. Then, they can decide for themselves what they want to do. I'm completely against taking choices away from people, but I also believe that if people understood how animals are treated in some instances, they will step up and ban them on their own. Maybe I have too much faith in the human race.....

    2 years ago

  • Vanessayoung

    Vanessayoung says:

    @SEOWebDesign, I love you :)

    2 years ago

  • DaisyDiddles

    DaisyDiddles says:

    To SEOWebDesign, in regards to the Biblical basis for eating meat. Yes, originally God gave us plants, but later allowed meat. It's found in Genesis 9:1-3 ~ "Then God blessed Noah and his sons, saying to them, “Be fruitful and increase in number and fill the earth. The fear and dread of you will fall upon all the beasts of the earth and all the birds of the air, upon every creature that moves along the ground, and upon all the fish of the sea; they are given into your hands. Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

    2 years ago

  • 5gardenias

    5gardenias says:

    If humans were subjected to force feedings, while living in small cages against their will and nature-- will it be o.k. then to ban such methods? Well of course. Can't we agree that it's wrong to exploit or harm others no matter whether human or animal? Bible quotes citing human's rights to eat all things do not excuse mistreatment of animals --or anything for that matter. The exploitation and cruelty that exists in the industrial farming industry has reached epic proportions as more and more countries are demanding meat as a regular staple in their diets. There are repercussions that create a domino effect from over consumption of any products.To name a few-- there are repercussions on our health and environment from overgrazing, loss of forestation, antibiotics and hormone transfer, excessive methane production, pesticide transfer and ruination of soil. In addition animals with tumors, cancer and infections due to stress, pain, extreme confinement and ill care are processed and added to products being used for human consumption and in pet foods. These are serious issues. We wonder why so many people are suffering from disease. The old adage-- you are what you eat couldn't be more appropriate. There is no need for anyone to eat fois gras. There is no need to eat any meat 7 days a week. If people were aware and thoughtful about their consumption they would scale back on eating meat and consume more vegetables and grains which on the whole is a healthier mix. It's time for people to wake up and realize that we are in fact not superior to everything else on the planet--we are all intrinsically linked. We do not have the right to cause pain and suffering in the animal kingdom for our entertainment or in order to enjoy a gluttonous diet. We are entering the 21st century and it's high time for people to move toward a more enlightened and empathic relation to one another and the all of the living things around them. Animals experience fear, pain, love, empathy ( it seems more than humans), -they have intelligence, and have social orders within their species. Animals are not the ones polluting the environment, engaging in wars, committing crimes, they don't exploit one another and the land they live on, they live within the balance -- It's people who have created the imbalances on this planet and we are seeing these effects at every turn. Whether its eating fois gras, wearing fur, or eating meat on a regular basis-- you can not escape the fact that you are supporting industries that create worlds of misery, enslavement, exploitation and in the end horrifying slaughter. I challenge anyone to go on the internet and face the facts by watching footage of what happens in slaughterhouses and on industrial large scale farms. The abuse, cruelty and sickness of it all are eyeopeners. Watch some footage of ducks and geese being force fed and then go and enjoy your delicacy knowing that all happened for you.

    2 years ago

  • BijouxOdalisque

    BijouxOdalisque says:

    To salt the wound, not only do my customers still have to read this and possibly feel alienated by the subject matter, I just noticed that Etsy carefully "highlighted" responses made by members who enjoyed having this article on our front page. Those comments are now "featured" along with a rebuttal by the author while the remaining comments are just left to trail off. How convenient. How ironic. It coincides with a public duel over censorship on the internet.

    2 years ago

  • amberalexander

    amberalexander says:

    I can't add anything new that hasn't already been said well by others, but I am insulted and disgusted by this article and etsy for promoting it.

    2 years ago

  • amberalexander

    amberalexander says:

    to quote threeblackcats... "This article has really put Etsy in a new light for me. Not a very bright one either."

    2 years ago

  • amberalexander

    amberalexander says:

    and THANK YOU, California.

    2 years ago

  • DaisyDiddles

    DaisyDiddles says:

    5Gardenias, speaking for myself, I only posted Bible verses in response to someone who stated something different than what is in the Bible (saying something isn't there, when it clearly is) and I wanted to clarify and share the verses. Nowhere is it ever condoned, to abuse and mistreat animals, however and my comment containing the verses about eating meat was in no way a show of support for foie gras or animal abuse.

    2 years ago

  • 2TrickPony

    2TrickPony says:

    An excerpt from the blog article: "I’m more than a little flustered at California’s pending law forbidding the production and sale of foie gras" ... I took a moment and read this law, and it does NOT outlaw foie gras, but instead bans, quite specifically, "force feeding". Please read this excerpt::This bill would establish similar provisions regarding force feeding a bird, as defined. The bill would prohibit a person from force feeding a bird for the purpose of enlarging the bird’s liver beyond normal size, and would prohibit a person from hiring another person to do so. The bill would also prohibit a product from being sold in the state if it is the result of force feeding a bird for the purpose of enlarging the bird’s liver beyond normal size” ….So in California, it would be allowable to sell foie gras produced by other methods, and it seems that the "natural foie gras" as produced by Edwardo Sousa would be allowed. I would also like to invite the author to investigate bans on hydrogenated oils and high fructose corn syrup and the like because they certainly do exist and have already forced large companies to change their ingredients.

    2 years ago

  • glamourpuss86

    glamourpuss86 says:

    Nice pick up TrickPony!

    2 years ago

  • TheFlyingHippo

    TheFlyingHippo says:

    Are you kidding me? I am wholly disheartened reading this selfish, insensitive, and entirely unenlightening article on Etsy. This blog post is full of so many logical fallacies, I'd be ashamed to have claimed authorship. By the way, to the author-- fish is meat, too.

    2 years ago

  • RareDaisyJewelry

    RareDaisyJewelry says:

    eeew~ HOW CRUEL!!!!!! Etsy, what the heck are you thinking? Have you seen how this is made??????????

    2 years ago

  • VEGANLOTUS

    VEGANLOTUS says:

    NO WAY..Just BE VEG, GO GREEN, 2 SAVE THE PLANET..Only Love and Compassion!

    2 years ago

  • standpretty

    standpretty says:

    I CANNOT BELIEVE ETSY IS POSTING AN ARTICLE WRITTEN BY SOMEONE WHO BRAGS ABOUT EATING FOIE GRAS. SHAME SHAME SHAME. THIS ARTICLE IS DISGUSTING.

    2 years ago

  • standpretty

    standpretty says:

    Contact etsy and express your outrage. I want this article GONE! blog@etsy.com!!!!!!!!

    2 years ago

  • TursiArt

    TursiArt says:

    As an etsian, I have to wonder what the heck this article has to do with anything on this site... ? As a Libertarian and a Californian, I oppose any goofy and superfluous law that does nothing besides infringe on our rights. I thought this was supposed to be the land of the free? I can't even fatten up a goose and devour it's liver now? How stupid. As a foodie, I have to admit that Foie Gras tastes like crap.

    2 years ago

  • KawaiiBits

    KawaiiBits says:

    What is that... peanut butter looking stuff. Is that the liver?? Sorry, i've never ate this ................... stuff.....

    2 years ago

  • tifotter

    tifotter says:

    To see foie gras on the etsy blog is a huge disappointment. Feeding ducks and geese until their livers are 10-times normal is extremely painful. You're actually eating a diseased organ. Ducks are sentient, feeling individuals and there is NOTHING natural or sustainable about foie gras. It is inherently cruel and widely regarded to be one of the top-3 MOST cruel animal products, along with veal and battery-caged hen eggs. I am disgusted this is a "feature" on your blog.

    2 years ago

  • artbysusmitha

    artbysusmitha says:

    "Animals are God's creatures, not human property, nor utilities, nor resources, nor commodities, but precious beings in God's sight. ... Christians whose eyes are fixed on the awfulness of crucifixion are in a special position to understand the awfulness of innocent suffering. The Cross of Christ is God's absolute identification with the weak, the powerless, and the vulnerable, but most of all with unprotected, undefended, innocent suffering." —Rev. Andrew Linzey There is absolutely NO excuse for hiding behind religious books and quotations to be cruel out of selfish reasons!! If you are under the delusion the Bible encourages the slaughter of innocent beings then think about this, there are other religious books which are interpreted as if they condone the killing of human beings who don't believe in what they do. Does that make things like murder and terrorism right?? A living being is a living being and using common sense and compassion will make you realize that animals feel and suffer just as much as we do! For those of you claiming that the Bible says it's okay to eat meat, here's something to think about: http://jesusveg.com/index2.html

    2 years ago

  • artbysusmitha

    artbysusmitha says:

    Also, as shameful as this article is, I am *truly* happy to see how it has brought together so many people standing up for the animals. *Vegan hugs all around.*

    2 years ago

  • DaisyDiddles

    DaisyDiddles says:

    artbysusmitha...that jesusveg website is erroneous and not in any way Biblical. It is an emotional appeal and an attempted guilt trip geared towards anyone to whom Jesus and/or veganism appeals. As far as believers, mandatory veganism is a false burden to tie on the backs of those who don't know the Bible well enough to know any better. As for unbelievers, that website simply portrays Jesus in a way the Bible doesn't. The Bible clearly teaches that we DO have freedom, either to eat meat or not to eat meat and those who make one choice are not to look down on those who make the other. At the very least, we know that Jesus Himself ate fish (we read the account in Scripture after His resurrection). Being a Jew who also celebrated the Passover, it's safe to say He also ate lamb. Are we more righteous and moral than the Savior of the world? I don't think so. There is nobody more compassionate and merciful than God. I'm not trying to turn this into a religious argument, but when something is said that doesn't depict Jesus accurately, or the Bible correctly, I feel compelled to speak up. Bottom line, this conversation has evolved from 'why foie gras is wrong' to 'eating meat is wrong'. As a Christian, I believe that it's important to differentiate between truly 'Biblically wrong (wrong in God's eyes)' and 'wrong in our opinion (wrong in our own eyes)'. God calls on us to 'be kind', which would include showing mercy and compassion to all of His creation, not just people. This is where my conscience is stirred...not on the point of whether to eat meat at all, but rather on the point of the treatment of the animals that I'm eating. As stewards of God's creation, we do have a responsibility. There's no way that mistreating and abusing animals is 'OK'. Any time I've ever considered becoming a vegetarian, it's ALWAYS been because of my concerns over how animals in food production are treated and not because I think that eating meat is morally 'wrong' in and of itself, since the Bible doesn't support this view. We always have to be careful not to make the Bible say something it doesn't in order to try to support one view or another, no matter what the issue.

    2 years ago

  • amberalexander

    amberalexander says:

    "flustered"...? ugh. still can't believe what I read.

    2 years ago

  • standpretty

    standpretty says:

    I would just like everyone to know that I contacted etsy about this article and they defended it, even going so far as to claim it isn't inhumane, like the author did. They will not be removing it, they don't care how ridiculous it is.

    2 years ago

  • Redolynnce

    Redolynnce says:

    The article is ridiculous. Torturing animals for our own pleasure is not what we are put on the earth for. There are other foods that we can enjoy and indulge on. Anyone defending the cruelty of animals just so they can have a small taste of this, I think has some deep soul searching to do, to see what is really important in life. It definitely is not eating foie gras. Keep priority straight in your life. This message is to the writer of the article. Have a heart. Love and be loved. And find something else to indulge yourself in.

    2 years ago

  • BijouxOdalisque

    BijouxOdalisque says:

    Please take a few moments to savor (pun intended) the other hypocricies this author has shared prior to "Foie GrasGate" Etsians have asked for such articles to be kept from our front page, so we do not alienate our customer base and we are powerless to rectify this situation. So Etsy, I urge you instead, to please take the time to investigate how reliable y(our) blog posts are. Quotes from past food-related articles by the same author: Don't live in Florida? Oh well... "True, you may not see as many oranges in Minnesota as you would in California, but if you’re living in a harsh, wintry climate, you’re probably not meant to have tons of citrus in your winter diet." From the "(In)Efficiency of Local Food" 12/22/2011 But I thought you just said we might not be meant to have it? Taking out food for granted? I'm shocked! Hmm... "Part of the problem with today’s food supply is that our diets have adapted to fuel the growth of large-scale, industrialized agriculture." From "The Importance of Diet Diversity" 08/11/2011 I thought in France you enjoyed the excessive eating and drinking of champgne and foie gras? "It’s the last Thursday of November, the annual American holiday of giving thanks. To the uninitiated, the day appears to be an excuse for excessive eating, drinking, and an indulgent afternoon of football. If you didn’t grow up with Thanksgiving, it takes a while to get excited about brining and roasting a 30-pound turkey (that curious bird with the alien tassels around its neck)." From "Let Us Give Thanks" 11/24/2011 Ok, wait...so entrails yes? no? I am getting confused. "It was significant that my first meat harvesting experience was a batch of turkeys destined for the Thanksgiving table. In confronting my own discomfort about that process of the food chain that we’re so immune to — the part where an animal becomes dinner – I gained a deeper appreciation not only for the food on my table, but also for the work that went into its production and its preparation. Amid the demands of a busy life, it becomes too easy to take our food for granted, regardless of our relationships with the people who produce them. This Thanksgiving, take a moment to “bless the food” before tucking in. " From "Bless the Food: A Turkey Story 11/10/2011 While the production of foie gras doesn't illicit much emotion from our author, she does have an affinity for cute little grasshoppers: "Personally, the entirety of its anatomy puts me off. I blame the torrent of media that have subconsciously socialized me to the notion that bugs, insects and worms are enemies to be squished — except when they’re anthropomorphized in colorful pixels for our entertainment." From "Eating Insects: The Key to the Future?" 11/13/2011 Uh oh...here escargot cane make someone a food snob? "His latest faux pas, according to The New York Times, was to label Paula Deen as a “menace” to America by virtue of her deep-fried, calorific-laden food universe. Perhaps because of his global palate and escargot-laden resume, it’s easy to label Bourdain as a food snob, as Deen did, triggering another war of opinions about America’s food habits." - From "The Food Celebrity Pradox" 09/08/2011 The fishies get more consideration? "However, a simple poster cannot assuage my skeptical side. I need more information to come to an informed decision. I’m left with a pressing question on the tip of my tongue: Where did this seafood come from and how was it caught?" From "Demystifying Sustainable Seafood" 7/28/2011 Thank you for any time you take to consider removing such handmade/vintage/supply/Etsy irrelevant articles that are written by a hyprocritcal, seemingly confused (?) food critic. I would like my customers to feel welcome, see a bit of consistency, and feel that Etsy is here for them, not for the provocation of heated arguments amongst those using this website to make a living (and happily paying our Etsy fees for a customer-friendly website . ) Thank you kindly.

    2 years ago

  • BijouxOdalisque

    BijouxOdalisque says:

    Just a note. I consider this to be one of the best articles ever posted on Etsy: http://www.etsy.com/blog/en/2012/adding-value-to-small-farms/ Fabulous. Thank you for this.

    2 years ago

  • BijouxOdalisque

    BijouxOdalisque says:

    http://www.etsy.com/blog/en/2012/adding-value-to-small-farms/ FABULOUS article, imo

    2 years ago

  • thegreeninggirl

    thegreeninggirl says:

    I am absolutely against foie gras. I will not eat at any restaurant that sells it. I am glad that California will be banning it.

    2 years ago

  • SEOWebDesign

    SEOWebDesign says:

    @DaisyDiddles, please carefully note the words in Genesis 9.2 (AS version): "And the FEAR AND DREAD OF YOU shall be on every beast of the earth, and on every bird of the heavens . . . ." Genesis 3 reads, "Every moving thing that liveth shall be food for you; As the green herb have I given you all." These words are not a command from God nor permission from Him to eat the flesh of animals. These words are a prediction of one of the results of the sinful human condition which includes, among many other things, fear and dread of us from other creatures.

    2 years ago

  • SEOWebDesign

    SEOWebDesign says:

    Free speech is a wonderful freedom and regardless of my own strong feelings and views on this subject, I would not censor the writer of this blog article. Considering all the comments and responses from Etsy sellers, I am glad to see that the blog article does not represent the views and beliefs of the majority of the people here. It is impossible to "sell" the view of this blog writer to a community of people who connect with and love "all creatures great and small." Considering that all the chefs in Chicago agreed to stop selling Goose Liver Pate in their restaurants a few years ago, I think this article would be a hard "sell" anywhere, even among many chefs.

    2 years ago

  • RossLab

    RossLab says:

    Heavy stuff...

    2 years ago

  • DaisyDiddles

    DaisyDiddles says:

    @SEOWebDesign: "Every moving thing that lives shall be food for you. And as I gave you the green plants, I give you everything." (Genesis 9:3). I'm not sure how God could have been any clearer than He was, in this verse. He gave us the green plants. Then He gave us everything. Here's a link to an entire page of commentaries on it: http://bible.cc/genesis/9-3.htm The 'permission' granted by God in Genesis 9 is reflected throughout the remainder of the Bible...between the sacrificial system (which foreshadowed Jesus) and the Passover meal itself. To say that the God of the Bible doesn't condone eating meat is profoundly untrue. In fact, He went out of His way to give Israel a list of clean and unclean foods (including animals) in the Old Testament. The Passover meal alone confirms that eating meat is acceptable to God and if it wasn't, Jesus never would have done it, Himself!

    2 years ago

  • FeltedFriends

    FeltedFriends says:

    Oh, here look - I found a video of an actual foie gras production plant. This is footage secretly taped, from Canada's largest foie gras producer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ozws-u4xb0&feature=youtu.be The force feeding procedure starts around 1:47. I'd like to see how folks supporting this product feel after watching this.

    2 years ago

  • elizasteindesigns

    elizasteindesigns says:

    Good to see that many more people on Etsy are against this barbaric practice! Add my voice to the chorus!

    2 years ago

  • dwoodward20

    dwoodward20 says:

    There are so many other issues out that that the state needs to focus on. "Banning" Foie Gras ... give me a break! Quit spending our tax dollars on pointless bans. What about banning the crap that they feed kids in school? Or start fining the ranches that cram animals into a cage, then force feed them, so they fatten up before the big butchering day. We spent time on a farm in France, where they raise the geese that produce some of France's finest foie gras. The geese had full range to run around, flap their wings, play, swim, and eat. Once their fate happened, none of the bird was wasted; but instead it was turned into delicious meals. I would rather enjoy that as a meal instead of ground up hamburger from the "cow" mill. People need to start focusing this negative energy on more important topics; put money towards making our planet a better place to live, and start educating our children.

    2 years ago

  • 2TrickPony

    2TrickPony says:

    the state of California is banning the force feeding of birds, not, as falsely claimed by the author of this article, foie gras. producers will be allowed to make and sell foie gras if it is NOT produced by inhumane force feeding. Really, a correction needs to be added to this article. ''''''''""""From the NYT: "Upon taking effect, the law would not only wipe out Mr. Gonzalez's operation, in the Central Valley, but would also prohibit the sale of foie gras anywhere in California -- no matter where it comes from -- if it is made by force-feeding birds to enlarge their livers, a centuries-old culinary tradition from Périgord and Gascony known as ''gavage.''" NYT Oct 6, 2004.

    2 years ago

  • ArtyDidact

    ArtyDidact says:

    Thanks for this provocative article and the many thoughtful comments! I would support a ban on the force-feeding of birds and other animals, it's a good start and an appropriate role for government — not telling people what to eat, but regulating industry to set reasonable limits on what they can do to animals to turn them into food. I am an omnivore, and I enjoy a good pate (sorry, I don't know how to make diacritical marks, I hope you know I mean "pa-tay"!) as much as anyone, but there are many delicious alternatives to foie gras, I find them at my co-op often. We as consumers can make informed choices about what kinds of practices we will support with our dollars, and it's increasingly easy to find food producers who use enlightened practices.

    2 years ago

  • nicoahsmeem

    nicoahsmeem says:

    How is this a topic for etsy? Is this still a marketplace or is it a forum to voice political views?

    2 years ago

  • komaweiss

    komaweiss says:

    Can't believe etsy features an article about Foie Gras! It's disgusting how someone can support this cruelty.

    2 years ago

  • lauracunningham5

    lauracunningham5 says:

    Really? You're going to defend your right to enjoy this so-called "delicacy" by pointing out that its a longstanding tradition and also by pointing to other heinous acts practiced in today's food industry??!! I stand in total agreement with so many other posts here - multiple wrongs don't make a single wrong LESS offensive. Kudos to GreenBubble's comment above. Does the human conscience NEED a laboratory study to tell us if these ducks and geese are suffering or not?! Where is your God-given sense of reason?! And as for the history of foie gras, be it practiced ten years or ten thousand, it is as unconscionable an act now as it was the first time. Yes, there are many crimes being committed in the food industry - including foie gras. Let us strive to treat this planet and the magnificent creatures on it with respect. Deny yourself this "indulgence" for the sake of a living creature's right to live and die without being tortured. NAMASTE. You do yoga, right? Well, the word MEANS something. Look into it.

    2 years ago

  • StephySleeps

    StephySleeps says:

    As many people that have commented agree, there may be such thing as a lesser of 2 evils, but they are both still 'evils!' Factory farmed animals suffer horrendously just so that we can enjoy meat, and I have seen footage of a duck being force fed for the purposes of food, and both to me are equally unacceptable. An argument for Fois Gras cannot be simply that it 'isn't as bad' as another form eating animals. I agree though that banning Fois Gras probably seems silly when factory faming and fish farms are everywhere, but you have to start somewhere right? Tackling something that is on a smaller scale, that is eaten by less people first, is probably a logical place to start. But more importantly, they should all be educated as to the reasons why this is not acceptable. I love food, but is it really worth eating meat, knowing that something has suffered and died for it? Puts me off a bit i must say! Oh and @VoleedeMoineaux - Many top athletes are infact Vegan, it is a massive misconception that people who do not eat meat suffer with anemia or that if people stop eating meat they suddenly develop it. The amount of protein you can obtain from a Vegan diet is huge, the information is out there, you need to go and find it. We are taught nutrition via the food pyramid in school, but this was created by the dairy industry (hence it having Dairy as a food group!). You can lead a very healthy lifestyle (and avoid many horrible diseases) by avoiding meat and dairy. For instance, cholesterol is pretty much a direct reaction to eating animal produce. Steph Bristol UK x

    2 years ago

  • TinsAndThings

    TinsAndThings says:

    Just want to thank the many posters (vegan, vegetarian and meat-eaters alike!) for their thoughtful, compassionate and logical responses. Even though I wonder if Danielle knows what the term "inhumane" (put in quotation marks four times) actually means, I'm glad that others clearly do. Because frankly, when I saw the title of this article I wondered if as a vegan I should even be peddling my vintage wares on a site that publishes this type of animal-cruelty-is-bad-but-it-tastes-so-good! drivel. Thankfully, readers of the article restored my faith.

    2 years ago

  • callancushing

    callancushing says:

    Please watch this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxR4oCg35Jg It's very well done and may help connect you to what foie gras actually is.

    2 years ago

  • miasu

    Mia Adams from miasu says:

    "However, I’m also aware that part of that discomfort is a result of anthropomorphizing animals reared for consumption." I totes agree. Dude. They're animals. My life is better when they die. My life (and the rest of the world's) is NOT better when they get to live, and nobody gets to eat them. So, really, it's in their best interest to die. They are doing far more good as food providers than as useless animals. That's simply my personal opinion though. I love meat, meat is often cruel, I still love meat. Associating animals with lives that matter is ridiculous. Feeding people with valuable portions of fat and protein matters far more than your self-righteous, all vegetable diet. Be glad that you get to complain about the welfare of animals--because I guarantee you--if it were between your Mum being healthy or Bessie living a long, bovine life, you'd not complain so much. You're in a very special place called privilege. Privilege makes us think that our opinions matter when people are dying or being oppressed. That's what "inhumanity" is. There's a reason why the word "human" is used, and not "animal." Prioritizing animal's comfort over human lives is stupid. Next time you see a hungry child (which, Hulu ads keep telling me is 1 in 5 in America)--tell her that you can't give her any meat, because meat is cruel. And then give her a raw lettuce leaf full of other fun veggies, and tell her that that will satisfy her conscience--to hell with hunger and nutrition! Privilege is power. And power means choice. How abouts you be happy that you have a choice to feel sorry for delicious animals instead of ranting about how everyone else should too.

    2 years ago

  • lotusheart01

    Bel from TheLotusHeart says:

    @ Mia Adams yours is as you say an opinion and everyone has the right to one of those (thankfully). Most opinions here however, are rooted in compassion for other living beings and yes it really is as simple as that. Whether you eat meat or not is totally your choice but when a statement such as "Associating animals with lives that matter is ridiculous." is just thrown out there one has to wonder when did the human race begin to go so horribly wrong? It may just be another part of the growing American / Western sense of self importance and entitlement but whatever it is it is definitely an ugly side to humanity. And I am just glad we get to choose our own friends and to form our own opinions.

    2 years ago

  • mathildacraft

    Lauren says:

    Force feeding animals isn't right. Neither is veal and I don't eat that either.

    2 years ago

  • ToosDetectiveAgency

    Sara Schroeder from ToosDetectiveAgency says:

    Just because foie gras occurs in nature doesn't make shoving a funnel down an animal's throat okay. It occurs in the human population as well, after years and years of alcohol dependence. Yum!

    1 year ago

  • thelittlestpolly

    Polly Bland from thelittlestpolly says:

    foie gras is so disgusting..... I look differently upon anyone who eats it... Just.... sickening.

    1 year ago

  • GypsyIntent

    GypsyIntent from GypsyIntent says:

    I can't believe you wrote an article promoting this, it's nasty and cruel. No matter how many other nasty and cruel things go on in the world, this should be stopped. I don't believe you can justify your approval of cruelty by listing other cruelties that go on without being stopped. 'Oh, but this cruelty is tasty' Attitudes like yours are what is wrong with this country.

    1 year ago

  • louisemead

    Louise Mead from louisemead says:

    I think your view that it should be ok because there are other, possibly more inhumane forms of meat production, is highly flawed. If we took the view that any cruel act is ok so long as there are other, more cruel acts taking place then the world would be a hideous place to live. I'm sure some people might argue that it's not nice now but I would argue that it would be far worse if everyone took this view. There are plenty of highly convincing arguments for not eating any meat, fish, or animal products at all. However, an outright ban on all of them is not possible or practical at least in the immediate future. In the meantime, any steps to ban cruel practices in food production, particularly of 'luxury' items that have little or no benefit to the health of those consuming it (or indeed of those creatures being consumed), should be welcomed with open arms. You are perfectly entitled to your opinion. It's fine if you want to admit that it doesn't concern you enough personally to stop eating such products. However to try and pretend either to yourself or to others that there is moral argument to be made in favour of eating foie gras is at best naive, and at worst misleading.

    1 year ago