The Etsy Blog

News From the Craft + Style Blogosphere: October 14, 2010

Etsy.com handmade and vintage goods

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“People remain what they are even if their faces fall apart.” — Bertolt Brecht

The bobby pins on Ray Eames’s bedside table, a web of sticky threads jointed by a fat cocoon, bananas-as-loafers and the haze over a beach at dawn: all in this week’s edition of News From the Craft + Style Blogosphere.

 

 

 

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It’s been said that you can never truly know someone until you’ve seen how they live. Leslie Williamson‘s Handcrafted Modern: At Home With Mid-Century Designers eloquently documents the desks, modular furniture and dusty vignettes of the twentieth century’s most famous designers and architects. According to the New York Times Magazine, Williamson “only photographed houses that were in their original state (even if they had become museums after their owners’ deaths), which makes for some wonderful moments: the bobby pins on Ray Eames’s bedside table; Walter and Ise Gropius’s shared desk; a wall-mounted pink Trimline phone that seems to plug into the inside of the medicine cabinet in Albert Frey’s bathroom.”  [Via Reference Library]

 

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Kobe Levi‘s wearable sculpture (er, shoes) show that design most definitely trumps function. Seriously, slingshot slingbacks are not for the faint of heart. And the hoofed boots will most definitely be worn by Bjork before the year is out, I’m sure of it. [Via Melissa Dixson Taxidermist]

 

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Whenever I chance upon silk garments — usually kimono or moth-eaten gowns from the 1920s in an antique store — I have to marvel at the magic of nature and human ingenuity. The people of China, in conjunction with fantastical cocooned silk worms, have been spinning these tenuous threads into delicate, lustrous bolts for hundreds of years, and the photos of the process are mind-boggling. However, the tradition of sericulture, also known as silk farming, seems to be dying off. According to the Times, “The young people have found they can earn more doing migrant work in cities…and the hand looms of Jili could not compete with the machines introduced into factories in the 20th century.” [Via The New York Times]

 

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I think a trip to a rock-studded beach or a quiet woodland glade is in order this weekend — don’t you? 

[Via I Am An Age Old Tree]


Do you know of a forward-thinking art, style or design blog? Post it in the comments! And make sure to check out past installments of News From the Craft + Style Blogosphere!